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  1.  13
    Telling a Story, Writing a Narrative: Terminology in Health Care.John Wiltshire - 1995 - Nursing Inquiry 2 (2):75-82.
    This paper examines the current use of the terms ‘story’, ‘narrative’ and ‘voice’ within health care. It argues that the focus on narrative forms is related to nursing's professional development of an alternative epistemology to science, and to nursing theorists' mistrust of ‘Enlightenment’ modes. However, in order for this project to be productively developed it is necessary to distinguish story from narrative: the former is an informal activity, the latter is meditative and theoretical. Both have dierapeutic dimensions.
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  2.  5
    Containing Abjection in Nursing: The End of Shift Handover as a Site of Containment.John Wiltshire & Judith Parker - 1996 - Nursing Inquiry 3 (1):23-29.
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  3. Jane Austen, Health, and the Body.John Wiltshire - 1991 - The Critical Review 31 (122):34.
  4.  15
    Medical Science, Nursing, and the Future.John Wiltshire - 1998 - Nursing Inquiry 5 (3):187-193.
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  5.  10
    Commentary on" A Phenomenology of Dyslexia".John Wiltshire & Paul A. Komesaroff - 1998 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 5 (1):21-23.
  6.  8
    Revolution and the Form of the British Novel, 1790–1825, Intercepted Letters, Interrupted Seductions.John Wiltshire - 1995 - History of European Ideas 21 (2):299-300.
  7. Bioethics and the Pathography.John Wiltshire - 1993 - The Critical Review 33:112-28.
     
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  8. Frances Burney and the Doctors: Patient Narratives Then and Now.John Wiltshire - 2019 - Cambridge University Press.
    Frances Burney is primarily known as a novelist and playwright, but in recent years there has been an increased interest in the medical writings found within her private letters and journals. John Wiltshire advocates Burney as the unconscious pioneer of the modern genre of pathography, or the illness narrative. Through her dramatic accounts of distinct medical events, such as her own infamous operation without anaesthetic, to those she witnessed, including the 'madness' of George III and the inoculation of her son (...)
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