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  1.  11
    Guest Editorial: Corporate Social Responsibility in Controversial Industry Sectors. [REVIEW]Adam Lindgreen, François Maon, Jon Reast & Mirella Yani-De-Soriano - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 110 (4):393-395.
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  2.  44
    Legitimacy-Seeking Organizational Strategies in Controversial Industries: A Case Study Analysis and a Bidimensional Model.Jon Reast, François Maon, Adam Lindgreen & Joëlle Vanhamme - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (1):139-153.
    Controversial industry sectors, such as alcohol, gambling, and tobacco, though long-established, suffer organizational legitimacy problems. The authors consider various strategies used to seek organizational legitimacy in the U.K. casino gambling market. The findings are based on a detailed, multistakeholder case study pertaining to a failed bid for a regional supercasino. They suggest four generic strategies for seeking organizational legitimacy in this highly complex context: construing, earning, bargaining, and capturing, as well as pathways that combine these strategies. The case analysis and (...)
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  3.  43
    To Do Well by Doing Good: Improving Corporate Image Through Cause-Related Marketing.Joëlle Vanhamme, Adam Lindgreen, Jon Reast & Nathalie Popering - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 109 (3):259-274.
    As part of their corporate social responsibility, many organizations practice cause-related marketing, in which organizations donate to a chosen cause with every consumer purchase. The extant literature has identified the importance of the fit between the organization and the nature of the cause in influencing corporate image, as well as the influence of a connection between the cause and consumer preferences on brand attitudes and brand choice. However, prior research has not addressed which cause composition most appeals to consumers or (...)
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  4.  19
    To Do Well by Doing Good: Improving Corporate Image Through Cause-Related Marketing.Joëlle Vanhamme, Adam Lindgreen, Jon Reast & Nathalie van Popering - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 109 (3):259-274.
    As part of their corporate social responsibility, many organizations practice cause-related marketing, in which organizations donate to a chosen cause with every consumer purchase. The extant literature has identified the importance of the fit between the organization and the nature of the cause in influencing corporate image, as well as the influence of a connection between the cause and consumer preferences on brand attitudes and brand choice. However, prior research has not addressed which cause composition most appeals to consumers or (...)
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  5.  25
    The Manchester Super Casino: Experience and Learning in a Cross-Sector Social Partnership. [REVIEW]Jon Reast, Adam Lindgreen, Joëlle Vanhamme & François Maon - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (1):197 - 218.
    The management of cross-sector social partnerships (CSSPs) among government, business, and not-for-profit entities can be complex and difficult. This article considers the importance of organizational experience and learning for the successful development of CSSPs. By analyzing the Manchester Super Casino, this research emphasizes the significant benefits of prior experience with CSSPs that enable partners to learn and develop relationships, skills, and capabilities over time, which then have positive influences on future performance. The result is a refined learning model of the (...)
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  6.  17
    Deconstructing Subtle Racist Imagery in Television Ads.Haseeb A. Shabbir, Michael R. Hyman, Jon Reast & Dayananda Palihawadana - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 123 (3):421-436.
    Although ads with subtle racist imagery can reinforce negative stereotypes, advertisers can eliminate this problem. After a brief overview of predominantly U.S.-based research on the racial mix of models/actors in ads, a theoretical framework for unmasking subtle racial bias is provided and dimensional qualitative research is introduced as a method for identifying and rectifying such ad imagery. Results of a DQR-based study of 622 U.K. television ads with at least one Black actor indicate subtle racially biased imagery now supersedes overt (...)
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