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  1.  24
    Tensions in Corporate Sustainability: Towards an Integrative Framework.Tobias Hahn, Jonatan Pinkse, Lutz Preuss & Frank Figge - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 127 (2):297-316.
    This paper proposes a systematic framework for the analysis of tensions in corporate sustainability. The framework is based on the emerging integrative view on corporate sustainability, which stresses the need for a simultaneous integration of economic, environmental and social dimensions without, a priori, emphasising one over any other. The integrative view presupposes that firms need to accept tensions in corporate sustainability and pursue different sustainability aspects simultaneously even if they seem to contradict each other. The framework proposed in this paper (...)
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  2.  13
    A Paradox Perspective on Corporate Sustainability: Descriptive, Instrumental, and Normative Aspects.Tobias Hahn, Frank Figge, Jonatan Pinkse & Lutz Preuss - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 148 (2):235-248.
    The last decade has witnessed the emergence of a paradox perspective on corporate sustainability. By explicitly acknowledging tensions between different desirable, yet interdependent and conflicting sustainability objectives, a paradox perspective enables decision makers to achieve competing sustainability objectives simultaneously and creates leeway for superior business contributions to sustainable development. In stark contrast to the business case logic, a paradox perspective does not establish emphasize business considerations over concerns for environmental protection and social well-being at the societal level. In order to (...)
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  3.  40
    The Role of Short-Termism and Uncertainty Avoidance in Organizational Inaction on Climate Change: A Multi-Level Framework.Subhabrata Bobby Banerjee, Timo Busch, Jonatan Pinkse & Natalie Slawinski - 2017 - Business and Society 56 (2):253-282.
    Despite increasing pressure to deal with climate change, firms have been slow to respond with effective action. This article presents a multi-level framework for a better understanding of why many firms are failing to reduce their absolute greenhouse gas emissions, which contribute to climate change. The concepts of short-termism and uncertainty avoidance from research in psychology, sociology, and organization theory can explain the phenomenon of organizational inaction on climate change. Antecedents related to short-termism and uncertainty avoidance reinforce one another at (...)
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  4.  10
    Managing Physical Impacts of Climate Change: An Attentional Perspective on Corporate Adaptation.Federica Gasbarro & Jonatan Pinkse - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (2):333-368.
    Based on a study of the oil and gas industry, this article examines how physical impacts of climate change become events that firms notice and interpret in a way that leads to an active response to adapt to these impacts. Theoretically, the study draws on the attention-based view to highlight the potential biases that might occur as a consequence of firms’ preconceptions as well as organizational structure and context. In the empirical analysis, the article derives a model that explains the (...)
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  5.  8
    Does the Business Case Matter? The Effect of a Perceived Business Case on Small Firms’ Social Engagement.Rajat Panwar, Erlend Nybakk, Eric Hansen & Jonatan Pinkse - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 144 (3):597-608.
    The business case for social responsibility is one of the most widely studied topics in the business and society literature that focuses on large firms. This attention is understandable because large firms have an obligation to shareholders who, as commonly assumed, seek to maximize returns on their investments, in turn, pressing corporate managers to show that firms’ expenditures in social engagement would pay off. Small firms, on the other hand, rarely face such pressures, yet the BCSR logic is increasingly applied (...)
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  6.  7
    Multinationals' Political Activities on Climate Change.Ans Kolk & Jonatan Pinkse - 2007 - Business and Society 46 (2):201-228.
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  7.  11
    Competitive Strategies and Small Firms’ Social Responsibilities.Rajat Panwar, Erlend Nybakk, Jonatan Pinkse & Eric Hansen - 2015 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 26:99-111.
    The literature has long addressed the question if corporate social responsibility can help a firm differentiate from competition and reduce its costs of doing business, ultimately leading to a sustainable competitive advantage. These two possible CSR outcomes, differentiation and cost leadership, also represent the two paths that firms could take in their strategic pursuits. Despite this apparent synergy between a firm’s strategic path and CSR, previous studies have not explored whether firm strategic choices have a bearing upon their level of (...)
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  8.  14
    The Evolution of Multinationals' Responses to Climate Change.Ans Kolk & Jonatan Pinkse - 2005 - International Corporate Responsibility Series 2:175-190.
    Climate change is one of the environmental issues that has increasingly attracted business attention in the course of the 1990s. Multinationals have developed different strategies over the years, initially more political, nonmarket in nature, but currently also market-oriented. This article examines the evolution of multinationals’ responses to climate change, paying attention to both market and non-market components. It first gives an overview of the main policy developments, followed by a characterisation of non-marketand market responses, based on a survey among the (...)
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