Results for 'Jonathan C. S. Ives'

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  1.  30
    A systematic review of empirical bioethics methodologies.Rachel Davies, Jonathan C. S. Ives & Michael Dunn - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):15.
    Despite the increased prevalence of bioethics research that seeks to use empirical data to answer normative research questions, there is no consensus as to what an appropriate methodology for this would be. This review aims to search the literature, present and critically discuss published Empirical Bioethics methodologies.
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  2.  5
    All you Need it Trust? Public Perspectives on Consenting to Participate in Genomic Research in the Sri Lankan District of Colombo.Krishani Jayasinghe, W. A. S. Chamika, Kaushalya Jayaweera, Kalpani Abhayasinghe, Lasith Dissanayake, Athula Sumathipala & Jonathan Ives - forthcoming - Asian Bioethics Review:1-22.
    Engagement with genomic medicine and research has increased globally during the past few decades, including rapid developments in Sri Lanka. Genomic research is carried out in Sri Lanka on a variety of scales and with different aims and perspectives. However, there are concerns about participants' understanding of genomic research, including the validity of informed consent. This article reports a qualitative study aiming to explore the understanding, knowledge, and attitudes of the Sri Lankan public towards genomic medicine and to inform the (...)
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  3.  29
    Physiological Noise in Brainstem fMRI.Jonathan C. W. Brooks, Olivia K. Faull, Kyle T. S. Pattinson & Mark Jenkinson - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  4.  12
    Repetition and context effects in recognition memory.Jonathan C. Davis, Robert S. Lockhart & Donald M. Thomson - 1972 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 92 (1):96.
  5. On Putting Knowledge 'First'.Jonathan Ichikawa & C. S. I. Jenkins - 2017 - In Joseph Adam Carter, Emma C. Gordon & Benjamin Jarvis (eds.), Knowledge First: Approaches in Epistemology and Mind. Oxford University Press.
    There is a New Idea in epistemology. It goes by the name of ‘knowledge first,’ and it is particularly associated with Timothy Williamson’s book Knowledge and Its Limits. In slogan form, to put knowledge first is to treat knowledge as basic or fundamental, and to explain other states—belief, justification, maybe even content itself—in terms of knowledge, instead of vice versa. The idea has proven enormously interesting, and equally controversial. But deep foundational questions about its actual content remain relatively unexplored. We (...)
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  6.  7
    Paving the Great Way: Vasubandhu’s Unifying Buddhist Philosophy.Jonathan C. Gold - 2014 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    The Indian Buddhist philosopher Vasubandhu is known for his critical contribution to Buddhist Abhidharma thought, his turn to the Mahayana tradition, and his concise, influential Yogacara-Vijñanavada texts. _Paving the Great Way_ reveals another dimension of his legacy: his integration of several seemingly incompatible intellectual and scriptural traditions, with far-ranging consequences for the development of Buddhist epistemology and the theorization of tantra. Most scholars read Vasubandhu's texts in isolation and separate his intellectual development into distinct phases. Featuring close studies of Vasubandhu's (...)
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  7.  81
    God of Holy Love.Jonathan C. Rutledge & Jordan Wessling - 2023 - Journal of Analytic Theology 11:437-456.
    In the exceptional book _Divine Holiness and Divine Action_, Mark Murphy defends what he calls the _holiness framework _for divine action. The purpose of our essay-response to Murphy’s book is to consider an alternative framework for divine action, what we call the _agapist framework_. We argue that the latter framework is more probable than Murphy’s holiness framework with respect to_ select _theological desiderata.
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  8.  19
    Paradox and Contradiction in Theology.Jonathan C. Rutledge (ed.) - forthcoming - New York, NY: Routledge Academic.
    This book explores and expounds upon questions of paradox and contradiction in theology with an emphasis on recent contributions from analytic philosophical theology. It addresses questions such as: What is the place of paradox in theology? Where might different systems of logic (e.g., paraconsistent ones) find a place in theological discourse (e.g., Christology)? What are proper responses to the presence of contradiction(s) in one’s theological theories? Are appeals to analogical language enough to make sense of paradox? Bringing together an impressive (...)
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  9.  76
    No outside, no inside: Duality, reality and Vasubandhu's illusory elephant.Jonathan C. Gold - 2006 - Asian Philosophy 16 (1):1 – 38.
    Some of the basic terminology of Yogācāra philosophy needs reevaluation. Whereas commentaries almost universally gloss the term dvaya ('duality') with some version of the phrase grāhya grāhaka ca (lit. 'grasped and grasper', but usually translated as 'subject and object'), in fact this gloss is absent from the earliest strata. The term and its gloss are derived from separate streams of Yogācāra reasoning - one from discussions of linguistic conceptualization and the other from discussions of perception. Once we see that these (...)
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  10.  3
    Sakya Paṇḍita’s Anti-Realism As a Return to the Mainstream.Jonathan C. Gold - 2014 - Philosophy East and West 64 (2):360-374.
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  11.  22
    Sa-Skya Pandita’s Buddhist Argument For Linguistic Study.Jonathan C. Gold - 2005 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 33 (2):151-184.
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  12.  3
    The Urge to Know.Jonathan C. Calvert - 2014 - Hamilton Books.
    It was love at first sight when Jonathan Calvert saw the Matterhorn in 1953. Something in the way the mountain held sway over him inspired a lifelong passion for natural beauty and adventure. Over the next fifty years, Calvert climbed, hiked, trekked, sailed, kayaked, and dog-sledded in wild places across the globe, following his urge to know. And he hasn t quit yet. In July 2014, he will spend a month in Central Asia traveling the Silk Road through the (...)
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  13.  13
    A Value-Added Health Systems Science Intervention Based on My Life, My Story for Patients Living with HIV and Medical Students: Translating Narrative Medicine from Classroom to Clinic.Jonathan C. Chou, Jennifer J. Li, Brandon T. Chau, Tamar V. L. Walker, Barbara D. Lam, Jacqueline P. Ngo, Suad Kapetanovic, Pamela B. Schaff & Anne T. Vo - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (4):659-678.
    In 2018-2019, at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, we developed and piloted a narrative-based health systems science intervention for patients living with HIV and medical students in which medical students co-wrote patients’ life narratives for inclusion in the electronic health record. The pilot study aimed to assess the acceptability of the “life narrative protocol” from multiple stakeholder positions and characterize participants’ experiences of the clinical and pedagogical implications of the LNP. Students were recruited from (...)
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  14.  16
    Review of Nancy Howell’s Life Histories of the Dobe!Kung: Food, Fatness, and Well-Being over the Life-Span. [REVIEW]Jonathan C. K. Wells - 2011 - Human Nature 22 (3):370-375.
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  15. Minority of One: The Biography of Jonathan Blanchard.C. S. KILBY - 1959
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  16.  8
    Who's Arguing? A Call for Reflexivity in Bioethics.Michael Dunn Jonathan Ives - 2010 - Bioethics 24 (5):256-265.
    ABSTRACT In this paper we set forth what we believe to be a relatively controversial argument, claiming that ‘bioethics’ needs to undergo a fundamental change in the way it is practised. This change, we argue, requires philosophical bioethicists to adopt reflexive practices when applying their analyses in public forums, acknowledging openly that bioethics is an embedded socio‐cultural practice, shaped by the ever‐changing intuitions of individual philosophers, which cannot be viewed as a detached intellectual endeavour. This said, we argue that in (...)
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  17.  17
    Learning as embodied familiarization.Stephen C. Yanchar, Jonathan S. Spackman & James E. Faulconer - 2013 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 33 (4):216.
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  18. Embodied Cognition, Representationalism, and Mechanism: A Review and Analysis.Jonathan S. Spackman & Stephen C. Yanchar - 2014 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 44 (1):46-79.
    Embodied cognition has attracted significant attention within cognitive science and related fields in recent years. It is most noteworthy for its emphasis on the inextricable connection between mental functioning and embodied activity and thus for its departure from standard cognitive science's implicit commitment to the unembodied mind. This article offers a review of embodied cognition's recent empirical and theoretical contributions and suggests how this movement has moved beyond standard cognitive science. The article then clarifies important respects in which embodied cognition (...)
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  19.  25
    Jack of all trades, master of none? Challenges facing junior academic researchers in bioethics.Michael C. Dunn, Zeynep Gurtin-Broadbent, Jessica R. Wheeler & Jonathan Ives - 2008 - Clinical Ethics 3 (4):160-163.
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  20.  54
    Who's arguing? A call for reflexivity in bioethics.Jonathan Ives & Michael Dunn - 2010 - Bioethics 24 (5):256-265.
    In this paper we set forth what we believe to be a relatively controversial argument, claiming that 'bioethics' needs to undergo a fundamental change in the way it is practised. This change, we argue, requires philosophical bioethicists to adopt reflexive practices when applying their analyses in public forums, acknowledging openly that bioethics is an embedded socio-cultural practice, shaped by the ever-changing intuitions of individual philosophers, which cannot be viewed as a detached intellectual endeavour. This said, we argue that in order (...)
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  21.  80
    Appropriate methodologies for empirical bioethics: It's all relative.Jonathan Ives & Heather Draper - 2009 - Bioethics 23 (4):249-258.
    In this article we distinguish between philosophical bioethics (PB), descriptive policy orientated bioethics (DPOB) and normative policy oriented bioethics (NPOB). We argue that finding an appropriate methodology for combining empirical data and moral theory depends on what the aims of the research endeavour are, and that, for the most part, this combination is only required for NPOB. After briefly discussing the debate around the is/ought problem, and suggesting that both sides of this debate are misunderstanding one another (i.e. one side (...)
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  22.  20
    The role of Nikolai Berdyaev in the early writings of Hans Urs von Balthasar: A contribution to the question of Balthasar’s appropriation of sources.C. Michael Shea & Jonathan S. King - 2013 - Journal for the History of Modern Theology/Zeitschrift für Neuere Theologiegeschichte 20 (2):226-257.
    This contribution examines the relatively unresearched doctoral thesis of Hans Urs von Balthasar as a Germanist, particularly in relation to the role that the reading of the Russian religious philosopher Nikolai Berdyaev played in the development of Balthasar's earliest theological thought. The authors argue that Berdyaev provided the young Germanist with a markedly eschatological point of departure for his nascent theological reflections. Although Balthasar had to renounce certain aspects of Berdyaev's thought, this eschatological orientation received from Berdyaev nevertheless remained recognizable (...)
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  23.  16
    Tandem Androgenic and Psychological Shifts in Male Reproductive Effort Following a Manipulated “Win” or “Loss” in a Sporting Competition.Daniel P. Longman, Michele K. Surbey, Jay T. Stock & Jonathan C. K. Wells - 2018 - Human Nature 29 (3):283-310.
    Male-male competition is involved in inter- and intrasexual selection, with both endocrine and psychological factors presumably contributing to reproductive success in human males. We examined relationships among men’s naturally occurring testosterone, their self-perceived mate value, self-esteem, sociosexuality, and expected likelihood of approaching attractive women versus situations leading to child involvement. We then monitored changes in these measures in male rowers from Cambridge, UK, following a manipulated “win” or “loss” as a result of an indoor rowing contest. Baseline results revealed that (...)
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  24.  37
    PPI, paradoxes and Plato: who's sailing the ship?: Table 1.Jonathan Ives, Sarah Damery & Sabi Redwod - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (3):181-185.
    Over the last decade, patient and public involvement (PPI) has become a requisite in applied health research. Some funding bodies demand explicit evidence of PPI, while others have made a commitment to developing PPI in the projects they fund. Despite being commonplace, there remains a dearth of engagement with the ethical and theoretical underpinnings of PPI processes and practices. More specifically, while there is a small (but growing) body of literature examining the effectiveness and impact of PPI, there has been (...)
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  25.  11
    Catholicism Engaging Other Faiths: Vatican Ii and its Impact.Michael Amaladoss S. J., Roberto Catalano, Francis X. Clooney S. J., Archbishop Michael L. Fitzgerald, Richard Girardin, Roger Haight S. J., Sallie B. King, Vladimir Latinovic, Leo D. Lefebure, Archbishop Felix Machado, Gerard Mannion, Alexander E. Massad, Sandra Mazzolini, Dawn M. Nothwehr O. S. F., John T. Pawlikowski O. S. M., Peter C. Phan, Jonathan Ray, William Skudlarek O. S. B., Cardinal Jean-Louis Tauran, Jason Welle O. F. M. & Taraneh R. Wilkinson (eds.) - 2018 - Springer Verlag.
    This book assesses how Vatican II opened up the Catholic Church to encounter, dialogue, and engagement with other world religions. Opening with a contribution from the President of the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue, Cardinal Jean-Louis Tauran, it next explores the impact, relevance, and promise of the Declaration Nostra Aetate before turning to consider how Vatican II in general has influenced interfaith dialogue and the intellectual and comparative study of world religions in the postconciliar decades, as well as the contribution (...)
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  26.  97
    Becoming a father/refusing fatherhood: an empirical bioethics approach to paternal responsibilities and rights.J. Ives, H. Draper, H. Pattison & C. Williams - 2008 - Clinical Ethics 3 (2):75-84.
    In this paper, we present the first stage of an empirical bioethics project exploring the moral sources of paternal responsibilities and rights. In doing so, we present both (1) data on men's normative constructions of fatherhood and (2) the first of a two-stage methodological approach to empirical bioethics. Using data gathered from 12 focus groups run with UK men who have had a variety of different fathering experiences (n = 50), we examine men's perspectives on how paternal responsibilities and rights (...)
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  27. Formal Ontology for Natural Language Processing and the Integration of Biomedical Databases.Jonathan Simon, James M. Fielding, Mariana C. Dos Santos & Barry Smith - 2005 - International Journal of Medical Informatics 75 (3-4):224-231.
    The central hypothesis of the collaboration between Language and Computing (L&C) and the Institute for Formal Ontology and Medical Information Science (IFOMIS) is that the methodology and conceptual rigor of a philosophically inspired formal ontology greatly benefits application ontologies. To this end r®, L&C’s ontology, which is designed to integrate and reason across various external databases simultaneously, has been submitted to the conceptual demands of IFOMIS’s Basic Formal Ontology (BFO). With this project we aim to move beyond the level of (...)
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  28.  38
    Intuitive Probabilities and the Limitation of Moral Imagination.Arseny A. Ryazanov, Jonathan Knutzen, Samuel C. Rickless, Nicholas J. S. Christenfeld & Dana Kay Nelkin - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (S1):38-68.
    There is a vast literature that seeks to uncover features underlying moral judgment by eliciting reactions to hypothetical scenarios such as trolley problems. These thought experiments assume that participants accept the outcomes stipulated in the scenarios. Across seven studies, we demonstrate that intuition overrides stipulated outcomes even when participants are explicitly told that an action will result in a particular outcome. Participants instead substitute their own estimates of the probability of outcomes for stipulated outcomes, and these probability estimates in turn (...)
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  29.  60
    IEEN workshop report: aims and methods in interdisciplinary and empirical bioethics.John Owens, Jonathan Ives & Alan Cribb - 2012 - Clinical Ethics 7 (4):157-160.
    Bioethics is a diverse field that accommodates a broad range of perspectives and disciplines. The recent explosion of literature on methods in interdisciplinary and empirical ethics might appear, however, to overshadow the fact that ‘bioethics’ has long been an interdisciplinary field. The Interdisciplinary and Empirical Ethics Network (IEEN) was established, with funding from the Wellcome Trust, to facilitate critical and constructive discussion around the nature of this disciplinary diversity and shift focus away from the ‘empirical turn’, towards the ongoing development (...)
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  30.  12
    Artificial intelligence in clinical decision‐making: Rethinking personal moral responsibility.Helen Smith, Giles Birchley & Jonathan Ives - 2023 - Bioethics 38 (1):78-86.
    Artificially intelligent systems (AISs) are being created by software developing companies (SDCs) to influence clinical decision‐making. Historically, clinicians have led healthcare decision‐making, and the introduction of AISs makes SDCs novel actors in the clinical decision‐making space. Although these AISs are intended to influence a clinician's decision‐making, SDCs have been clear that clinicians are in fact the final decision‐makers in clinical care, and that AISs can only inform their decisions. As such, the default position is that clinicians should hold responsibility for (...)
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  31.  6
    Common genetic variants in the CLDN2 and PRSS1-PRSS2 loci alter risk for alcohol-related and sporadic pancreatitis.David C. Whitcomb, Jessica LaRusch, Alyssa M. Krasinskas, Lambertus Klei, Jill P. Smith, Randall E. Brand, John P. Neoptolemos, Markus M. Lerch, Matt Tector, Bimaljit S. Sandhu, Nalini M. Guda, Lidiya Orlichenko, Samer Alkaade, Stephen T. Amann, Michelle A. Anderson, John Baillie, Peter A. Banks, Darwin Conwell, Gregory A. Coté, Peter B. Cotton, James DiSario, Lindsay A. Farrer, Chris E. Forsmark, Marianne Johnstone, Timothy B. Gardner, Andres Gelrud, William Greenhalf, Jonathan L. Haines, Douglas J. Hartman, Robert A. Hawes, Christopher Lawrence, Michele Lewis, Julia Mayerle, Richard Mayeux, Nadine M. Melhem, Mary E. Money, Thiruvengadam Muniraj, Georgios I. Papachristou, Margaret A. Pericak-Vance, Joseph Romagnuolo, Gerard D. Schellenberg, Stuart Sherman, Peter Simon, Vijay P. Singh, Adam Slivka, Donna Stolz, Robert Sutton, Frank Ulrich Weiss, C. Mel Wilcox, Narcis Octavian Zarnescu, Stephen R. Wisniewski, Michael R. O'Connell, Michelle L. Kienholz, Kathryn Roeder & M. Micha Barmada - unknown
    Pancreatitis is a complex, progressively destructive inflammatory disorder. Alcohol was long thought to be the primary causative agent, but genetic contributions have been of interest since the discovery that rare PRSS1, CFTR and SPINK1 variants were associated with pancreatitis risk. We now report two associations at genome-wide significance identified and replicated at PRSS1-PRSS2 and X-linked CLDN2 through a two-stage genome-wide study. The PRSS1 variant likely affects disease susceptibility by altering expression of the primary trypsinogen gene. The CLDN2 risk allele is (...)
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  32.  16
    IEEN workshop report: Professionalism in interdisciplinary and empirical bioethics.John Owens, Jonathan Ives & Alan Cribb - 2014 - Clinical Ethics 9 (4):109-112.
    The Interdisciplinary and Empirical Ethics Network was established in 2012 with funding from the Wellcome Trust in order to facilitate critical and constructive discussion around the nature of the disciplinary diversity within bioethics and to consider the ongoing development of bioethics as an evolving field of interdisciplinary study. In April 2013, the Interdisciplinary and Empirical Ethics Network organized a workshop at the Centre for Public Policy Research, King’s College London, which discussed the nature and possibility of professionalism within interdisciplinary and (...)
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  33.  13
    Compassionate care during withdrawal of treatment: A secondary analysis of ICU nurses' experiences.Nikolaos Efstathiou & Jonathan Ives - 2018 - Nursing Ethics 25 (8):1075-1086.
    Background:Withdrawal of treatment is a common practice in intensive care units when treatment is considered futile. Compassion is an important aspect of care; however, it has not been explored much within the context of treatment withdrawal in intensive care units.Objectives:The aim was to examine how concepts of compassion are framed, utilised and communicated by intensive care nurses in the context of treatment withdrawal.Design:The study employed a qualitative approach conducting secondary analysis of an original data set. In the primary study, 13 (...)
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  34.  10
    Greek Philosophers.C. C. W. Taylor, Jonathan Barnes & R. M. Hare - 1999 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Almost uniquely for someone whose thought has been so influential, Socrates wrote nothing himself, and our knowledge of his philosophical opinions and method is derived mainly from the engaging and infuriating figure who appears in Plato's dialogues. The philosophy of Socrates and Plato is therefore closely interconnected, and the most powerful elements of Plato's mature thought form the basis of an interpretation of knowledge, reality, and morality which is still held and debated by philosophers today. Aristotle's approach to these and (...)
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  35.  1
    The analogue of harmony; some reflections on Schiller's philosophical essays.Margaret C. Ives - 1970 - Pittsburgh, Pa.,: Duquesne University Press.
  36.  3
    Origins and Ownership of Remdesivir: Implications for Pricing.ChangWon C. Lee, Jonathan J. Darrow, Jerry Avorn & Aaron S. Kesselheim - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (3):613-618.
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  37.  4
    What is ‘moral distress’ in nursing? A feminist empirical bioethics study.Georgina Morley, Caroline Bradbury-Jones & Jonathan Ives - 2020 - Nursing Ethics 27 (5):1297-1314.
    BackgroundThe phenomenon of ‘moral distress’ has continued to be a popular topic for nursing research. However, much of the scholarship has lacked conceptual clarity, and there is debate about what it means to experience moral distress. Moral distress remains an obscure concept to many clinical nurses, especially those outside of North America, and there is a lack of empirical research regarding its impact on nurses in the United Kingdom and its relevance to clinical practice.Research aimTo explore the concept of moral (...)
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  38.  13
    Reasons to Redefine Moral Distress: A Feminist Empirical Bioethics Analysis.Georgina Morley, Caroline Bradbury-Jones & Jonathan Ives - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (1):61-71.
    There has been increasing debate in recent years about the conceptualization of moral distress. Broadly speaking, two groups of scholars have emerged: those who agree with Jameton’s ‘narrow definition’ that focuses on constraint and those who argue that Jameton’s definition is insufficient and needs to be broadened. Using feminist empirical bioethics, we interviewed critical care nurses in the United Kingdom about their experiences and conceptualizations of moral distress. We provide our broader definition of moral distress and examples of data that (...)
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  39. The truth about 'the truth about true blue'.Jonathan Cohen, C. L. Hardin & Brian P. McLaughlin - 2007 - Analysis 67 (2):162–166.
    It can happen that a single surface S, viewed in normal conditions, looks pure blue (“true blue”) to observer John but looks blue tinged with green to a second observer, Jane, even though both are normal in the sense that they pass the standard psychophysical tests for color vision. Tye (2006a) finds this situation prima facie puzzling, and then offers two different “solutions” to the puzzle.1 The first is that at least one observer misrepresents S’s color because, though normal in (...)
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  40.  39
    Challenges faced by research ethics committees in el Salvador: Results from a focus group study.Jonathan W. Camp, Raymond C. Barfield, Virginia Rodriguez, Amanda J. Young, Ruthbeth Finerman & Miguela A. Caniza - 2007 - Developing World Bioethics 9 (1):11-17.
    ABSTRACT Objective: To identify perceived barriers to capacity building for local research ethics oversight in El Salvador, and to set an agenda for international collaborative capacity building. Methods: Focus groups were formed in El Salvador which included 17 local clinical investigators and members of newly formed research ethics committees. Information about the proposed research was presented to participants during an international bioethics colloquium sponsored and organized by the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in collaboration with the National Ethics Committee of (...)
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  41.  56
    Neonatal Viability in the 1990s: Held Hostage by Technology.Jonathan Muraskas, Patricia A. Marshall, Paul Tomich, Thomas F. Myers, John G. Gianopoulos & David C. Thomasma - 1999 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (2):160-170.
    The emergence of new obstetrical and neonatal technologies, as well as more aggressive clinical management, has significantly improved the survival of extremely low birth weight infants. This development has heightened concerns about the limits of viability. ELBW infants, weighing less than 1,000 grams and no larger than the palm of one's hand, are often described as of late twentieth century technology. Improved survivability of ELBW infants has provided opportunities for long-term follow-up. Information on their physical and emotional development contributes to (...)
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  42. Binding arguments and hidden variables.Jonathan Cohen & Samuel C. Rickless - 2007 - Analysis 67 (1):65-71.
    o (2000), 243). In particular, the idea is that binding interactions between the relevant expressions and natural lan- guage quantifiers are best explained by the hypothesis that those expressions harbor hidden but bindable variables. Recently, however, Herman Cappelen and Ernie Lepore have rejected such binding arguments for the presence of hid- den variables on the grounds that they overgeneralize — that, if sound, such arguments would establish the presence of hidden variables in all sorts of ex- pressions where it is (...)
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  43.  4
    Multiple Faiths in Postcolonial Cities: Living Together After Empire.Jonathan Dunn, Heleen Joziasse, Raj Bharat Patta, Helena Mary Kettleborough, Phil Barton, Elaine Bishop, Terry Biddington, C. I. David Joy, Esther Mombo, Chris Shannahan & Peter Manley Scott - 2019 - Springer Verlag.
    This book addresses the challenges of living together after empire in many post-colonial cities. It is organized in two sections. The first section focuses on efforts by people of multiple faiths to live together within their contexts, including such efforts within a neighborhood in urban Manchester; the array of attempts at creating multi-faith spaces for worship across the globe; and initiatives to commemorate divisive conflict together in Northern Ireland. The second section utilizes particular postcolonial methods to illuminate pressing issues within (...)
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  44.  27
    Who gets the gametes? An argument for a points system for fertility patients.Simon Jenkins, Jonathan Ives, Sue Avery & Heather Draper - 2017 - Bioethics 32 (1):16-26.
    This paper argues that the convention of allocating donated gametes on a ‘first come, first served’ basis should be replaced with an allocation system that takes into account more morally relevant criteria than waiting time. This conclusion was developed using an empirical bioethics methodology, which involved a study of the views of 18 staff members from seven U.K. fertility clinics, and 20 academics, policy-makers, representatives of patient groups, and other relevant professionals, on the allocation of donated sperm and eggs. Against (...)
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  45.  40
    Parents’ attitudes toward consent and data sharing in biobanks: A multisite experimental survey.Armand H. Matheny Antommaria, Kyle B. Brothers, John A. Myers, Yana B. Feygin, Sharon A. Aufox, Murray H. Brilliant, Pat Conway, Stephanie M. Fullerton, Nanibaa’ A. Garrison, Carol R. Horowitz, Gail P. Jarvik, Rongling Li, Evette J. Ludman, Catherine A. McCarty, Jennifer B. McCormick, Nathaniel D. Mercaldo, Melanie F. Myers, Saskia C. Sanderson, Martha J. Shrubsole, Jonathan S. Schildcrout, Janet L. Williams, Maureen E. Smith, Ellen Wright Clayton & Ingrid A. Holm - 2018 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 9 (3):128-142.
  46.  24
    Sleep and memory: Definitions, terminology, models, and predictions?Jonathan K. Foster & Andrew C. Wilson - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (1):71-72.
    In this target article, Walker seeks to clarify the current state of knowledge regarding sleep and memory. Walker's review represents an impressively heuristic attempt to synthesize the relevant literature. In this commentary, we question the focus on procedural memory and the use of the term “consolidation,” and we consider the extent to which empirically testable predictions can be derived from Walker's model.
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  47.  11
    Proportionality, wrongs and equipoise for natural immunity exemptions: response to commentators.Jonathan Pugh, Julian Savulescu, Rebecca C. H. Brown & Dominic Wilkinson - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (11):881-883.
    We would like to thank each of the commentators on our feature article for their thoughtful engagement with our arguments. All the commentaries raise important questions about our proposed justification for natural immunity exemptions to COVID-19 vaccine mandates. Thankfully, for some of the points raised, we can simply signal our agreement. For instance, Reiss is correct to highlight that our article did not address the important US-centric considerations she helpfully raises and fruitfully discusses. We also agree with Williams about the (...)
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  48.  62
    Experimental Philosophical Bioethics of Personal Identity.Brian D. Earp, Jonathan Lewis, J. Skorburg, Ivar Hannikainen & Jim A. C. Everett - 2022 - In Kevin P. Tobia (ed.), Experimental Philosophy of Identity and the Self. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 183-202.
    The question of what makes someone the same person through time and change has long been a preoccupation of philosophers. In recent years, the question of what makes ordinary or lay people judge that someone is—or isn’t—the same person has caught the interest of experimental psychologists. These latter, empirically oriented researchers have sought to understand the cognitive processes and eliciting factors that shape ordinary people’s judgments about personal identity and the self. Still more recently, practitioners within an emerging discipline, experimental (...)
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  49. New books. [REVIEW]H. Mounce, C. H. Whiteley, L. Jonathan Cohen, Don Locke, Antony Flew, Richard Robinson & S. A. Grave - 1972 - Mind 81 (324):618-639.
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  50.  98
    Wittgensteinian : Looking at the World From the Viewpoint of Wittgenstein’s Philosophy.A. C. Grayling, Shyam Wuppuluri, Christopher Norris, Nikolay Milkov, Oskari Kuusela, Danièle Moyal-Sharrock, Beth Savickey, Jonathan Beale, Duncan Pritchard, Annalisa Coliva, Jakub Mácha, David R. Cerbone, Paul Horwich, Michael Nedo, Gregory Landini, Pascal Zambito, Yoshihiro Maruyama, Chon Tejedor, Susan G. Sterrett, Carlo Penco, Susan Edwards-Mckie, Lars Hertzberg, Edward Witherspoon, Michel ter Hark, Paul F. Snowdon, Rupert Read, Nana Last, Ilse Somavilla & Freeman Dyson (eds.) - 2019 - Springer Verlag.
    “Tell me," Wittgenstein once asked a friend, "why do people always say, it was natural for man to assume that the sun went round the earth rather than that the earth was rotating?" His friend replied, "Well, obviously because it just looks as though the Sun is going round the Earth." Wittgenstein replied, "Well, what would it have looked like if it had looked as though the Earth was rotating?” What would it have looked like if we looked at all (...)
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