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  1.  16
    Reading Non-Dualism in Śivādvaita Vedānta: An Argument From the Śivādvaitanirṇaya in Light of the Śivārkamaṇidīpikā.Jonathan Duquette - 2016 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 44 (1):67-79.
    This article examines Appaya Dīkṣita’s intellectual affiliation to Śivādvaita Vedānta in light of his well-known commitment to Advaita Vedānta. Attention will be given to his Śivādvaitanirṇaya, a short work expounding the nature of the Śivādvaita doctrine taught by Śrīkaṇṭha in his Śaiva-leaning commentary on the Brahmasūtra. It will be shown how Appaya strategically interprets Śrīkaṇṭha’s views on the relationship between Śiva, its power of consciousness and the individual self, along the lines of pure non-dualism. In this context, the hermeneutical role (...)
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  2. “Quantum Physics and Vedanta”: A Perspective From Bernard D'Espagnat's Scientific Realism.Jonathan Duquette - 2011 - Zygon 46 (3):620-638.
    Abstract. In the last decades, several rapprochements have been made between quantum physics and the Advaita Vedānta (AV) school of Hinduism. Theoretical issues such as the role of the observer in measurement and physical interconnectedness have been associated with tenets of AV, generating various critical responses. In this study, I propose to address this encounter in the light of recent works on philosophical implications of quantum physics by the physicist and philosopher of science Bernard d’Espagnat.
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  3.  40
    Anyathākhyāti : A Critique by Appaya Dīkṣita in the Parimala. [REVIEW]Jonathan Duquette & K. Ramasubramanian - 2009 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 37 (4):331-347.
    In this paper, the problem of illusory perception, as approached by the Nyāya and Advaita Vedānta schools of philosophy, is discussed from the standpoint of the Parimala. This seminal work belonging to the Bhāmatī tradition of Advaita Vedānta was composed in the sixteenth century by the polymath Appaya Dīkṣita. In the context of discussing various theories of illusion, Dīkṣita dwells upon the Nyāya theory of anyathākhyāti, and its connection with jñānalakṣaṇapratyāsatti as a causal factor for perception, and closely examines if (...)
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  4.  53
    Is Space Created?: Reflections on Śaṇkara's Philosophy and Philosophy of Physics.Jonathan Duquette & K. Ramasubramanian - 2010 - Philosophy East and West 60 (4):517-533.
    Here the concept of "space" is discussed from two different streams of thought: the view held by Advaita Vedānta, as expounded by Śaṇkara, and the view that emerges from the ongoing debates in modern philosophy of physics. The emphasis is on addressing the following question: is space created or not? To set the necessary backdrop for a better appreciation of the debate that evolved within the Indian tradition, we first examine how the Vaiśeṣika and Sāṃkhya schools of thought unfold the (...)
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  5.  45
    Is Space Created? Reflections on Śaṇkara's Philosophy and Philosophy of Physics.Jonathan Duquette & K. Ramasubramanian - 2010 - Philosophy East and West 60 (4):517-533.
    From Antiquity to the present day, the concept of space has engaged the attention of philosophers and scientists of every civilization. Space as a subject of philosophical inquiry appears quite early in Greek philosophy, especially in the works of natural philosophers such as Philolaus, Plato, and Aristotle.1 For about two thousand years, Aristotle's philosophy constituted the framework from which successive generations of Western philosophers and scientists attempted to reason about space. This view was shaken, however, with the publication of Newton's (...)
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  6.  3
    Epistemology, Logic and Metaphysics in Pre-Modern India: New Avenues for the Study of Navya-Nyāya.Hugo David & Jonathan Duquette - 2021 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 49 (2):145-151.
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  7.  2
    Saṁnyāsin in the Hindu Tradition: Changing Perspectives by Trichur S. Rukmani (Review).Jonathan Duquette - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (4):671-673.
  8.  4
    Saṁnyāsin in the Hindu Tradition: Changing Perspectives by Trichur S. Rukmani. [REVIEW]Jonathan Duquette - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (4):671-673.
  9.  3
    Index to Volume 60.Jonathan Duquette, K. Ramasubramanian & Is Space Created - 2010 - Philosophy East and West 60 (4):567-570.
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  10.  52
    Indic Visions in an Age of Science by Varadaraja V. Raman.Jonathan Duquette - 2012 - Zygon 47 (2):468-472.
  11.  5
    Navya-nyāya in the Late Vijayanagara Period: Appaya Dīkṣita’s Revision of Gaṅgeśa’s īśvarānumāna.Jonathan Duquette - 2021 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 49 (2):233-255.
    In his celebrated treatise of Navya-nyāya, the Tattvacintāmaṇi, Gaṅgeśa offers a detailed formulation of the inference of God’s existence. Gaṅgeśa’s inference generated significant commentarial literature among Naiyāyikas in Mithilā, Navadvīpa and Vārāṇasī, but also attracted the attention of South Indian scholars, notably Vyāsatīrtha, who comments on it extensively in the Tarkatāṇḍava. In the wake of Vyāsatīrtha’s pioneering critique, the 16th-century Sanskrit polymath Appaya Dīkṣita developed a revised version of Gaṅgeśa’s inference in his magnum opus of Śivādvaita Vedānta, the Śivārkamaṇidīpikā. This (...)
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  12. Classical and Contemporary Issues in Indian Studies: Essays in Honour of Trichur S.T. S. Rukmani, P. Pratap Kumar & Jonathan Duquette (eds.) - 2013 - D.K. Printworld.
    Issues in interpreting the yoga tradition -- Issues in interpreting the Vedānta tradition -- Issues of continuity and compatibility -- Issues of narrative, philosophical discourse and grammar -- Issues of Brāmanical intellectuals, ascetics and renunciants -- Issues in contemporary Hinduism : environment, non-violence, gender, faith and syncretism.
     
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