10 found
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  1. Medical Law and Ethics.Jonathan Herring - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    This book provides a clear, concise description of medical law; but it does more than that. It also provides an introduction to the ethical principles that can be used to challenge or support the law. It also provides a range of perspectives from which to analyse the law: feminist, religious and sociological perspectives are all used.
     
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  2.  13
    Why Sexual Penetration Requires Justification.Madden Dempsey Michelle & Herring Jonathan - 2007 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 27 (3):467-491.
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  3.  15
    “Please Don't Tell Me”.Jonathan Herring & Charles Foster - 2012 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (01):20-29.
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    The Double Effect Effect.Charles Foster, Jonathan Herring, Karen Melham & Tony Hope - 2011 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (1):56-72.
    The “doctrine of double effect” has a pleasing ring to it. It is regarded by some as the cornerstone of any sound approach to end-of-life issues and by others as religious mumbo jumbo. Discussions about “the doctrine” often generate more heat than light. They are often conducted at cross-purposes and laced with footnotes from Leviticus.
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    Intention and Foresight—From Ethics to Law and Back Again.Charles Foster, Jonathan Herring, Karen Melham & Tony Hope - 2013 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 22 (01):86-91.
  6.  7
    Please Don't Tell Me.Jonathan Herring & Charles Foster - 2011 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (1):20.
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    Interconnected, Inhabited and Insecure: Why Bodies Should Not Be Property.Jonathan Herring & P. -L. Chau - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (1):39-43.
    This article argues against the case for regarding bodies and parts of bodies to be property. It claims that doing so assumes an individualistic conception of the body. It fails to acknowledge that our bodies are made up of non-human material; are unbounded; constantly changing and deeply interconnected with other bodies. It also argues that holding that our bodies are property does not recognise the fact that we have different attitudes towards different parts of our removed bodies and the contexts (...)
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    Intention and Foresight—From Ethics to Law and Back Again - A Reply to McGee.Charles Foster, Jonathan Herring, Karen Melham & Tony Hope - 2013 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 22 (1):86-91.
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  9.  4
    Testing the Limits of the ‘Joint Account’ Model of Genetic Information: A Legal Thought Experiment.Charles Foster, Jonathan Herring & Magnus Boyd - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (5):379-382.
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  10. The Place of Carers.Jonathan Herring - 2008 - In Michael D. A. Freeman (ed.), Law and Bioethics / Edited by Michael Freeman. Oxford University Press.
     
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