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Jonathan Ives [27]Jonathan C. S. Ives [1]
  1.  18
    A Systematic Review of Empirical Bioethics Methodologies.Rachel Davies, Jonathan C. S. Ives & Michael Dunn - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):15.
    Despite the increased prevalence of bioethics research that seeks to use empirical data to answer normative research questions, there is no consensus as to what an appropriate methodology for this would be. This review aims to search the literature, present and critically discuss published Empirical Bioethics methodologies.
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  2.  22
    Standards of Practice in Empirical Bioethics Research: Towards a Consensus.Jonathan Ives, Michael Dunn, Bert Molewijk, Jan Schildmann, Kristine Bærøe, Lucy Frith, Richard Huxtable, Elleke Landeweer, Marcel Mertz, Veerle Provoost, Annette Rid, Sabine Salloch, Mark Sheehan, Daniel Strech, Martine de Vries & Guy Widdershoven - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):68.
    This paper responds to the commentaries from Stacy Carter and Alan Cribb. We pick up on two main themes in our response. First, we reflect on how the process of setting standards for empirical bioethics research entails drawing boundaries around what research counts as empirical bioethics research, and we discuss whether the standards agreed in the consensus process draw these boundaries correctly. Second, we expand on the discussion in the original paper of the role and significance of the concept of (...)
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  3.  4
    What is ‘Moral Distress’? A Narrative Synthesis of the Literature.Georgina Morley, Jonathan Ives, Caroline Bradbury-Jones & Fiona Irvine - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973301772435.
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  4.  70
    Appropriate Methodologies for Empirical Bioethics: It's All Relative.Jonathan Ives & Heather Draper - 2009 - Bioethics 23 (4):249-258.
    In this article we distinguish between philosophical bioethics (PB), descriptive policy orientated bioethics (DPOB) and normative policy oriented bioethics (NPOB). We argue that finding an appropriate methodology for combining empirical data and moral theory depends on what the aims of the research endeavour are, and that, for the most part, this combination is only required for NPOB. After briefly discussing the debate around the is/ought problem, and suggesting that both sides of this debate are misunderstanding one another (i.e. one side (...)
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  5.  41
    A Method of Reflexive Balancing in a Pragmatic, Interdisciplinary and Reflexive Bioethics.Jonathan Ives - 2014 - Bioethics 28 (6):302-312.
    In recent years there has been a wealth of literature arguing the need for empirical and interdisciplinary approaches to bioethics, based on the premise that an empirically informed ethical analysis is more grounded, contextually sensitive and therefore more relevant to clinical practice than an ‘abstract’ philosophical analysis. Bioethics has (arguably) always been an interdisciplinary field, and the rise of ‘empirical’ (bio)ethics need not be seen as an attempt to give a new name to the longstanding practice of interdisciplinary collaboration, but (...)
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  6.  9
    Mapping, Framing, Shaping: A Framework for Empirical Bioethics Research Projects.Richard Huxtable & Jonathan Ives - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):1-8.
    There is growing interest in the use and incorporation of empirical data in bioethics research. Much of the recent focus has been on specific “empirical bioethics” methodologies, which attempt to integrate the empirical and the normative. Researchers in the field are, however, beginning to explore broader questions, including around acceptable standards of practice for undertaking such research. The framework: In this article, we further widen the focus to consider the overall shape of an empirical bioethics research project. We outline a (...)
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  7.  43
    Who's Arguing? A Call for Reflexivity in Bioethics.Jonathan Ives & Michael Dunn - 2010 - Bioethics 24 (5):256-265.
    In this paper we set forth what we believe to be a relatively controversial argument, claiming that 'bioethics' needs to undergo a fundamental change in the way it is practised. This change, we argue, requires philosophical bioethicists to adopt reflexive practices when applying their analyses in public forums, acknowledging openly that bioethics is an embedded socio-cultural practice, shaped by the ever-changing intuitions of individual philosophers, which cannot be viewed as a detached intellectual endeavour. This said, we argue that in order (...)
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  8.  3
    Moral Distress and Austerity: An Avoidable Ethical Challenge in Healthcare.Georgina Morley, Jonathan Ives & Caroline Bradbury-Jones - 2019 - Health Care Analysis 27 (3):185-201.
    Austerity, by its very nature, imposes constraints by limiting the options for action available to us because certain courses of action are too costly or insufficiently cost effective. In the context of healthcare, the constraints imposed by austerity come in various forms; ranging from the availability of certain treatments being reduced or withdrawn completely, to reductions in staffing that mean healthcare professionals must ration the time they make available to each patient. As austerity has taken hold, across the United Kingdom (...)
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  9.  34
    ‘Encounters with Experience’: Empirical Bioethics and the Future. [REVIEW]Jonathan Ives - 2008 - Health Care Analysis 16 (1):1-6.
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  10.  25
    Altruism in Organ Donation: An Unnecessary Requirement?: Table 1.Greg Moorlock, Jonathan Ives & Heather Draper - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (2):134-138.
    Altruism has long been taken to be the guiding principle of ethical organ donation in the UK, and has been used as justification for rejecting or allowing certain types of donation. We argue that, despite this prominent role, altruism has been poorly defined in policy and position documents, and used confusingly and inconsistently. Looking at how the term has been used over recent years allows us to define ‘organ donation altruism’, and comparing this with accounts in the philosophical literature highlights (...)
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  11.  35
    Methodology, Epistemology, and Empirical Bioethics Research: A Constructive/Ist Commentary.Michael Dunn & Jonathan Ives - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (6-7):93-95.
  12.  13
    Have We Made Progress in Identifying (Surgical) Innovation?Giles Birchley, Richard Huxtable, Jonathan Ives & Jane Blazeby - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (6):25-27.
    Volume 19, Issue 6, June 2019, Page 25-27.
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  13.  23
    Setting Standards for Empirical Bioethics Research: A Response to Carter and Cribb.Michael Dunn, Jonathan Ives, Bert Molewijk & Jan Schildmann - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):66.
    This paper responds to the commentaries from Stacy Carter and Alan Cribb. We pick up on two main themes in our response. First, we reflect on how the process of setting standards for empirical bioethics research entails drawing boundaries around what research counts as empirical bioethics research, and we discuss whether the standards agreed in the consensus process draw these boundaries correctly. Second, we expand on the discussion in the original paper of the role and significance of the concept of (...)
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  14.  27
    PPI, Paradoxes and Plato: Who's Sailing the Ship?: Table 1.Jonathan Ives, Sarah Damery & Sabi Redwod - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (3):181-185.
    Over the last decade, patient and public involvement (PPI) has become a requisite in applied health research. Some funding bodies demand explicit evidence of PPI, while others have made a commitment to developing PPI in the projects they fund. Despite being commonplace, there remains a dearth of engagement with the ethical and theoretical underpinnings of PPI processes and practices. More specifically, while there is a small (but growing) body of literature examining the effectiveness and impact of PPI, there has been (...)
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  15.  46
    Getting From the Ethical to the Empirical and Back Again: The Danger of Getting It Wrong, and the Possibilities for Getting It Right: 2008 Bioethics Special Edition: Editorial 2. [REVIEW]Anna Smajdor, Jonathan Ives, Emma Baldock & Adele Langlois - 2008 - Health Care Analysis 16 (1):7-16.
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  16.  8
    Methodology and Myopia? Some Praise, a Problem, and a Plea.Jonathan Ives - 2016 - Hastings Center Report 46 (5):46-47.
    In “A Conceptual Model for the Translation of Bioethics Research and Scholarship,” Debra Mathews et al. aim to “begin an important discussion” about how to measure success in bioethics, and in doing so they set out a typology of bioethics research and scholarship with the arguably correct assumption that we cannot evaluate success in bioethics without first understanding what its goals are. I think the authors are correct in their claim that, in the current academic climate, having work in bioethics (...)
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  17.  78
    Does a Belief in God Lead to Moral Cowardice?: The Difference Between Courage of Moral Conviction and Acquisition: Ives Does a Belief in God Lead to Moral Cowardice?Jonathan Ives - 2008 - Think 7 (20):57-68.
    In our seventh and final piece on the theme “Good without God”, Jonathan Ives argues that reliance on God as an external source of moral authority leads to a kind of moral cowardice.
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  18.  2
    Reasons to Redefine Moral Distress: A Feminist Empirical Bioethics Analysis.Georgina Morley, Caroline Bradbury‐Jones & Jonathan Ives - forthcoming - Bioethics.
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  19.  5
    Implementation Science and Bioethics: Lessons From European Empirical Bioethics Research?Jonathan Ives, Giles Birchley & Richard Huxtable - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (4):80-82.
    Volume 20, Issue 4, May 2020, Page 80-82.
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  20.  53
    IEEN Workshop Report: Teaching and Learning in Interdisciplinary and Empirical Ethics.Jonathan Ives, John Owens & Alan Cribb - 2013 - Clinical Ethics 8 (2-3):70-74.
    Bioethics is an interdisciplinary field that accommodates a broad range of perspectives and disciplines. This inherent diversity sets a number of challenges for both teachers and students of bioethics, notably in respect to the appropriate aims and methods of bioethics education, standards and criteria for evaluating performance and disciplinary identity. The Interdisciplinary and Empirical Ethics Network (IEEN) was established, with funding from the Wellcome Trust, to facilitate critical and constructive discussion about the ongoing development of bioethics as an evolving field (...)
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  21.  7
    Conceptualising Surgical Innovation: An Eliminativist Proposal.Giles Birchley, Jonathan Ives, Richard Huxtable & Jane Blazeby - 2020 - Health Care Analysis 28 (1):73-97.
    Improving surgical interventions is key to improving outcomes. Ensuring the safe and transparent translation of such improvements is essential. Evaluation and governance initiatives, including the IDEAL framework and the Macquarie Surgical Innovation Identification Tool have begun to address this. Yet without a definition of innovation that allows non-surgeons to identify when it is occurring, these initiatives are of limited value. A definition seems elusive, so we undertook a conceptual study of surgical innovation. This indicated common conceptual areas in discussions of (...)
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  22.  21
    Who Gets the Gametes? An Argument for a Points System for Fertility Patients.Simon Jenkins, Jonathan Ives, Sue Avery & Heather Draper - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (1):16-26.
    This paper argues that the convention of allocating donated gametes on a ‘first come, first served’ basis should be replaced with an allocation system that takes into account more morally relevant criteria than waiting time. This conclusion was developed using an empirical bioethics methodology, which involved a study of the views of 18 staff members from seven U.K. fertility clinics, and 20 academics, policy-makers, representatives of patient groups, and other relevant professionals, on the allocation of donated sperm and eggs. Against (...)
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  23.  19
    On Classifying the Field of Medical Ethics.Kristine Bærøe, Jonathan Ives, Martine de Vries & Jan Schildmann - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):30.
    In 2014, the editorial board of BMC Medical Ethics came together to devise sections for the journal that would give structure to the journal help ensure that authors’ research is matched to the most appropriate editors and help readers to find the research most relevant to them. The editorial board decided to take a practical approach to devising sections that dealt with the challenges of content management. After that, we started thinking more theoretically about how one could go about classifying (...)
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  24.  28
    Should We Reject Donated Organs on Moral Grounds or Permit Allocation Using Non‐Medical Criteria?: A Qualitative Study.Greg Moorlock, Jonathan Ives, Simon Bramhall & Heather Draper - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (4):282-292.
    Conditional and directed deceased organ donations occur when donors attempt to influence the allocation of their donated organs. This can include asking that the organs are given to or withheld from certain types of people, or that they are given to specified individuals. Donations of these types have raised ethical concerns, and have been prohibited in many countries, including the UK. In this article we report the findings from a qualitative study involving interviews with potential donors, potential recipients and transplant (...)
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  25.  6
    Compassionate Care During Withdrawal of Treatment: A Secondary Analysis of ICU Nurses' Experiences.Nikolaos Efstathiou & Jonathan Ives - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973301668715.
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  26.  12
    L.I.F.E. And D.E.A.T.H.Jonathan Ives - 2007 - Health Care Analysis 15 (3):257-259.
    In this short, rhetorical article, I offer a thought experiment that seeks to make an analogy between ‘life’ and ‘disease’. This article was written whilst under the influence of Nietzsche, and I hope that readers will not mistake the polemical style and the occasional nod towards humour for flippancy. This is a serious subject, and this article attempts to ask, inexplicitly, a serious question. If we do suspend our subjective value judgements about life, and strip away what might be considered (...)
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  27.  15
    “Dunkirk Spirit:” Differences Between United Kingdom and United States Responses to Pandemic Influenza.Tom Sorell, Heather Draper, Sarah Damery & Jonathan Ives - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (11):21-22.
  28. License to Kill: A New Model for Excusing Medically Assisted Dying?Jonathan Ives & Richard Huxtable - 1st ed. 2015 - In Jukka Varelius & Michael Cholbi (eds.), New Directions in the Ethics of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia. Springer Verlag.
     
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