Results for 'Jonathan M. Smallwood'

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  1.  19
    Task unrelated thought whilst encoding information.Jonathan M. Smallwood, Simona F. Baracaia, Michelle Lowe & Marc Obonsawin - 2003 - Consciousness and Cognition 12 (3):452-484.
    Task unrelated thought (TUT) refers to thought directed away from the current situation, for example a daydream. Three experiments were conducted on healthy participants, with two broad aims. First, to contrast distributed and encapsulated views of cognition by comparing the encoding of categorical and random lists of words (Experiments One and Two). Second, to examine the consequences of experiencing TUT during study on the subsequent retrieval of information (Experiments One, Two, and Three). Experiments One and Two demonstrated lower levels of (...)
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  2. Barbara H. Basden, David R. Basden, and Matthew J. Wright. Part-list reexposure and release of.J. P. Maxwell, R. S. W. Masters, F. F. Eves, R. P. Behrendt, Jonathan M. Smallwood, Simona F. Baracaia, Michelle Lowe & Marc Obonsawin - 2003 - Consciousness and Cognition 12:320.
  3. Jonathan Smallwood, Marc Obonsawin, and Derek Heim. Task Unrelated Thought: The Role of.Robert West, Douglas F. Watt, P. Andrew Leynes, Christopher B. Mayhorn, Alfred Buck, Dawn M. McBride, Barbara Anne Dosher, Matthew Brown, Derek Besner & Alain Morin - 2002 - Consciousness and Cognition 11:375.
     
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  4.  1
    Age-related changes in ongoing thought relate to external context and individual cognition.Adam Turnbull, Giulia L. Poerio, Nerissa S. P. Ho, Léa M. Martinon, Leigh M. Riby, Feng V. Lin, Elizabeth Jefferies & Jonathan Smallwood - 2021 - Consciousness and Cognition 96:103226.
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  5. Puzzling over the imagination: Philosophical problems, architectural solutions.Jonathan M. Weinberg & Aaron Meskin - 2006 - In Shaun Nichols (ed.), The Architecture of the Imagination: New Essays on Pretence, Possibility, and Fiction. Oxford University Press. pp. 175-202.
  6. Imagine that!Jonathan M. Weinberg & Aaron Meskin - 2006 - In Matthew Kieran (ed.), Contemporary Debates in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art. Blackwell. pp. 222-235.
     
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  7. Normativity and epistemic intuitions.Jonathan M. Weinberg, Shaun Nichols & Stephen Stich - 2001 - Philosophical Topics, 29 (1-2):429-460.
    In this paper we propose to argue for two claims. The first is that a sizeable group of epistemological projects – a group which includes much of what has been done in epistemology in the analytic tradition – would be seriously undermined if one or more of a cluster of empirical hypotheses about epistemic intuitions turns out to be true. The basis for this claim will be set out in Section 2. The second claim is that, while the jury is (...)
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  8. Hellenicity: Between Ethnicity and Culture.Jonathan M. Hall - 2002
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  9. What's epistemology for? The case for neopragmatism in normative metaepistemology.Jonathan M. Weinberg - 2006 - In Stephen Hetherington (ed.), Epistemological Futures. Oxford University Press. pp. 26--47.
    How ought we to go about forming and revising our beliefs, arguing and debating our reasons, and investigating our world? If those questions constitute normative epistemology, then I am interested here in normative metaepistemology: the investigation into how we ought to go about forming and revising our beliefs about how we ought to go about forming and revising our beliefs -- how we ought to argue about how we ought to argue. Such investigations have become urgent of late, for the (...)
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  10. Experimental Philosophy, Noisy Intuitions, and Messy Inferences.Jonathan M. Weinberg - 2016 - In Jennifer Nado (ed.), Advances in Experimental Philosophy & Philosophical Methodology. Bloomsbury Academic.
    Much discussion about experimental philosophy and philosophical methodology has been framed in terms of the reliability of intuitions, and even when it has not been about reliability per se, it has been focused on whether intuitions meet whatever conditions they need to meet to be trustworthy as evidence. But really that question cannot be answered independently from the questions, evidence for what theories arrived at by what sorts of inferences? I will contend here that not just philosophy's sources of evidence, (...)
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  11. Are philosophers expert intuiters?Jonathan M. Weinberg, Chad Gonnerman, Cameron Buckner & Joshua Alexander - 2010 - Philosophical Psychology 23 (3):331-355.
    Recent experimental philosophy arguments have raised trouble for philosophers' reliance on armchair intuitions. One popular line of response has been the expertise defense: philosophers are highly-trained experts, whereas the subjects in the experimental philosophy studies have generally been ordinary undergraduates, and so there's no reason to think philosophers will make the same mistakes. But this deploys a substantive empirical claim, that philosophers' training indeed inculcates sufficient protection from such mistakes. We canvass the psychological literature on expertise, which indicates that people (...)
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  12. What's epistemology for? The case for neopragmatism in normative metaepistemology.Jonathan M. Weinberg - 2006 - In Stephen Hetherington (ed.), Epistemology Futures. Clarendon Press.
     
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  13. How to challenge intuitions empirically without risking skepticism.Jonathan M. Weinberg - 2007 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 31 (1):318–343.
    Using empirical evidence to attack intuitions can be epistemically dangerous, because various of the complaints that one might raise against them (e.g., that they are fallible; that we possess no non-circular defense of their reliability) can be raised just as easily against perception itself. But the opponents of intuition wish to challenge intuitions without at the same time challenging the rest of our epistemic apparatus. How might this be done? Let us use the term “hopefulness” to refer to the extent (...)
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  14. Knowledge, Noise, and Curve-Fitting: A methodological argument for JTB?Jonathan M. Weinberg - forthcoming - In R. Borges, C. de Almeida & P. Klein (eds.), Explaining Knowledge: New Essays on the Gettier Problem. Oxford University Press.
    The developing body of empirical work on the "Gettier effect" indicates that, in general, the presence of a Gettier-type structure in a case makes participants less likely to attribute knowledge in that case. But is that a sufficient reason to diverge from a JTB theory of knowledge? I argue that considerations of good model selection, and worries about noise and overfitting, should lead us to consider that a live, open question. The Gettier effect is perhaps so transient, and so sensitive (...)
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  15.  34
    Autonomy and the role of the family in making decisions at the end of life.Jonathan M. Breslin - 2005 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 16 (1):11.
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  16.  22
    Book discussion: Hisashi Nasu and Frances Chaput Waksler , Interaction and Everyday Life: Phenomenological and Ethnomethodological. Essays in Honor of George Psathas . Jonathan Wender: Phenomenological Sociology as an Intellectual Movement; Carlos Belevedere: “On George Psathas and Phenomenological Sociology”; Douglas Macbeth: “Ethnomethodological Explorations”. [REVIEW]Jonathan M. Wender, Carlos Belvedere & Douglas Macbeth - 2013 - Schutzian Research. A Yearbook of Worldly Phenomenology and Qualitative Social Science 5 (2013):121-149.
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  17.  44
    Medicine and Public Health, Ethics and Human Rights.Jonathan M. Mann - 1997 - Hastings Center Report 27 (3):6.
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  18.  34
    Archaic Greek States M. Kõiv: Ancient Tradition and Early Greek History. The Origins of States in Early-Archaic Sparta, Argos and Corinth . Pp. 427, maps. Tallinn: Avita Publishers, 2003. Paper. ISBN: 9985-2-0807-. [REVIEW]Jonathan M. Hall - 2005 - The Classical Review 55 (01):196-.
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  19.  24
    The IARC Monographs: Updated procedures for modern and transparent evidence synthesis in cancer hazard identification.Jonathan M. Samet, Weihsueh A. Chiu, Vincent Cogliano, Jennifer Jinot, David Kriebel, Ruth M. Lunn, Frederick A. Beland, Lisa Bero, Patience Browne, Lin Fritschi, Jun Kanno, Dirk W. Lachenmeier, Qing Lan, Gérard Lasfargues, Frank Le Curieux, Susan Peters, Pamela Shubat, Hideko Sone, Mary C. White, Jon Williamson, Marianna Yakubovskaya, Jack Siemiatycki, Paul A. White, Kathryn Z. Guyton, Mary K. Schubauer-Berigan, Amy L. Hall, Yann Grosse, Véronique Bouvard, Lamia Benbrahim-Tallaa, Fatiha El Ghissassi, Béatrice Lauby-Secretan, Bruce Armstrong, Rodolfo Saracci, Jiri Zavadil, Kurt Straif & Christopher P. Wild - unknown
    The Monographs produced by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) apply rigorous procedures for the scientific review and evaluation of carcinogenic hazards by independent experts. The Preamble to the IARC Monographs, which outlines these procedures, was updated in 2019, following recommendations of a 2018 expert Advisory Group. This article presents the key features of the updated Preamble, a major milestone that will enable IARC to take advantage of recent scientific and procedural advances made during the 12 years since (...)
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  20. The Lost Promise of Patriotism: Debating American Identity, 1890-1920.Jonathan M. Hansen - 2003 - University of Chicago Press.
    During the years leading up to World War I, America experienced a crisis of civic identity. How could a country founded on liberal principles and composed of increasingly diverse cultures unite to safeguard individuals and promote social justice? In this book, Jonathan Hansen tells the story of a group of American intellectuals who believed the solution to this crisis lay in rethinking the meaning of liberalism. Intellectuals such as William James, John Dewey, Jane Addams, Eugene V. Debs, and W. (...)
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  21.  23
    Experimentalist Rationalism, or Why It's OK if the A Priori Is Only 99.44 Percent Empirically Pure.Jonathan M. Weinberg - 2013 - In Albert Casullo & Joshua C. Thurow (eds.), The a Priori in Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 92.
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  22. Restrictionism and Reflection: Challenge Deflected, or Simply Redirected?Jonathan M. Weinberg, Joshua Alexander, Chad Gonnerman & Shane Reuter - 2012 - The Monist 95 (2):200-222.
    It has become increasingly popular to respond to experimental philosophy by suggesting that experimental philosophers haven’t been studying the right kind of thing. One version of this kind of response, which we call the reflection defense, involves suggesting both that philosophers are interested only in intuitions that are the product of careful reflection on the details of hypothetical cases and the key concepts involved in those cases, and that these kinds of philosophical intuitions haven’t yet been adequately studied by experimental (...)
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  23. Regress-stopping and disagreement for epistemic neopragmatists.Jonathan M. Weinberg - 2015 - In David K. Henderson & John Greco (eds.), Epistemic Evaluation: Purposeful Epistemology. Oxford University Press UK.
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  24. The prospects for an experimentalist rationalism, or why it's OK if the a priori is only 99.44 percent emprically pure.Jonathan M. Weinberg - 2013 - In Albert Casullo & Joshua C. Thurow (eds.), The a Priori in Philosophy. Oxford University Press UK.
     
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  25. Cappelen between rock and a hard place.Jonathan M. Weinberg - 2014 - Philosophical Studies 171 (3):545-553.
    In order for Herman Cappelen to argue in his Philosophy Without Intuitions that philosophers have been on the whole mistaken in thinking that we actually use intuitions much at all in our first-order philosophizing, he must attempt the task of characterizing what something must be, in order to be an intuition.My discussion here is focused on the latter half of the book concerning the “argument from philosophical practice. I am in wholehearted agreement with the first half’s thesis that the usage (...)
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  26. Analytic epistemology and experimental philosophy.Joshua Alexander & Jonathan M. Weinberg - 2007 - Philosophy Compass 2 (1):56–80.
    It has been standard philosophical practice in analytic philosophy to employ intuitions generated in response to thought-experiments as evidence in the evaluation of philosophical claims. In part as a response to this practice, an exciting new movement—experimental philosophy—has recently emerged. This movement is unified behind both a common methodology and a common aim: the application of methods of experimental psychology to the study of the nature of intuitions. In this paper, we will introduce two different views concerning the relationship that (...)
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  27. Intuition & calibration.Jonathan M. Weinberg, Stephen Crowley, Chad Gonnerman, Ian Vandewalker & Stacey Swain - 2012 - Essays in Philosophy 13 (1):15.
    The practice of appealing to esoteric intuitions, long standard in analytic philosophy, has recently fallen on hard times. Various recent empirical results have suggested that philosophers are not currently able to distinguish good intuitions from bad. This paper evaluates one possible type of approach to this problematic methodological situation: calibration. Both critiquing and building on an argument from Robert Cummins, the paper explores what possible avenues may exist for the calibration of philosophical intuitions. It is argued that no good options (...)
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  28.  31
    Jackson’s Empirical Assumptions.Stephen Stich & Jonathan M. Weinberg - 2001 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 62 (3):637-643.
    Frank Jackson has given us an elegant and important book. It is, by a long shot, the most sophisticated defense of the use of conceptual analysis in philosophy that has ever been offered. But we also we find it a rather perplexing book, for we can’t quite figure out what Jackson thinks a conceptual analysis is. And until we get clearer on that, we’re not at all sure that conceptual analysis, as Jackson envisions it, is possible. The main reason for (...)
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  29.  18
    Building General Knowledge of Mechanisms in Information Security.Jonathan M. Spring & Phyllis Illari - 2019 - Philosophy and Technology 32 (4):627-659.
    We show how more general knowledge can be built in information security, by the building of knowledge of mechanism clusters, some of which are multifield. By doing this, we address in a novel way the longstanding philosophical problem of how, if at all, we come to have knowledge that is in any way general, when we seem to be confined to particular experiences. We also address the issue of building knowledge of mechanisms by studying an area that is new to (...)
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  30. On doing better, experimental-style. [REVIEW]Jonathan M. Weinberg - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 145 (3):455 - 464.
    Timothy Williamson devotes significant effort in his The Philosophy of Philosophy to arguing against skepticism about judgment. One might think that the recent “experimental philosophy” challenge to the philosophical practice of appealing to intuitions as evidence is a possible target of those arguments. However, this is not so. The structure of that challenge is radically dissimilar from that of traditional skeptical arguments, and the aims of the challenge are entirely congruent with the spirit of methodological improvement that Williamson himself exemplifies (...)
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  31. The Challenge of Sticking with Intuitions through Thick and Thin.Joshua Alexander & Jonathan M. Weinberg - 2014 - In Booth Anthony Robert & P. Rowbottom Darrell (eds.), Intuitions. Oxford University Press.
    Philosophical discussions often involve appeals to verdicts about particular cases, sometimes actual, more often hypothetical, and usually with little or no substantive argument in their defense. Philosophers — on both sides of debates over the standing of this practice — have often called the basis for such appeals ‘intuitions’. But, what might such ‘intuitions’ be, such that they could legitimately serve these purposes? Answers vary, ranging from ‘thin’ conceptions that identify intuitions as merely instances of some fairly generic and epistemologically (...)
     
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  32.  7
    Building General Knowledge of Mechanisms in Information Security.Jonathan M. Spring & Phyllis Illari - 2019 - Philosophy and Technology 32 (4):627-659.
    We show how more general knowledge can be built in information security, by the building of knowledge of mechanism clusters, some of which are multifield. By doing this, we address in a novel way the longstanding philosophical problem of how, if at all, we come to have knowledge that is in any way general, when we seem to be confined to particular experiences. We also address the issue of building knowledge of mechanisms by studying an area that is new to (...)
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  33.  10
    Liberty as a right.Jonathan M. Riley - 2009 - The Philosophers' Magazine 46:46-52.
    The simple principle of individual liberty evidently does identify particular rights as rights which ought to be recognised and enforced by the laws and customs of every civil society, namely, the rights of self-regarding liberty and individuality. If sex between consenting adults is purely self-regarding conduct under some conditions, for instance, then adults should have a right to spontaneously engage in sex under those conditions if they wish.
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  34.  10
    Structural Racism in the COVID-19 Pandemic: Don’t Forget about the Children!Jonathan M. Marron - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (3):94-97.
    The COVID-19 pandemic has been unprecedented, in every sense of the word. At the time of writing, there have been nearly 80 million confirmed cases of coronavirus and nearly 2 million deaths worldw...
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  35. Moderate Epistemic Relativism and Our Epistemic Goals.Jonathan M. Weinberg - 2007 - Episteme 4 (1):66-92.
    Although radical forms of relativism are perhaps beyond the epistemological pale, I argue here that a more moderate form may be plausible, and articulate the conditions under which moderate epistemic relativism could well serve our epistemic goals. In particular, as a result of our limitations as human cognizers, we find ourselves needing to investigate the dappled and difficult world by means of competing communities of highly specialized researchers. We would do well, I argue, to admit of the existence of unresolvable (...)
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  36.  25
    Racism and sexism in medically assisted conception.Jonathan M. Berkowitz & Jack W. Snyder - 1998 - Bioethics 12 (1):25–44.
  37. The Methodological Necessity of Experimental Philosophy.Jonathan M. Weinberg - 2015 - Discipline Filosofiche 25 (1):23-42.
    Must philosophers incorporate tools of experimental science into their methodological toolbox? I argue here that they must. Tallying up all the resources that are now part of standard practice in analytic philosophy, we see the problem that they do not include adequate resources for detecting and correcting for their own biases and proclivities towards error. Methodologically sufficient resources for error- detection and error-correction can only come, in part, from the deployment of specific methods from the sciences. However, we need not (...)
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  38.  65
    The x-phi(les): unusual insights into the nature of inquiry.Jonathan M. Weinberg & Stephen Crowley - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 40 (2):227-232.
    Experimental philosophy is often regarded as a category mistake. Even those who reject that view typically see it as irrelevant to standard philosophical projects. We argue that neither of these claims can be sustained and illustrate our view with a sketch of the rich interconnections with philosophy of science.Keywords: Science; Philosophy; Experimental Philosophy.
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  39.  7
    Supplementing Herder’s Naturalism: Expanding the Senses and Transcending Cultures.Jonathan M. Weinberg - 2022 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 80 (2):234-238.
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  40. Spinoza et l'erreur.Jonathan M. Bennett - 1986 - Studia Spinozana: An International and Interdisciplinary Series 2:197-218.
     
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  41. Loose Constitutivity and Armchair Philosophy.Jonathan M. Weinberg & Stephen J. Crowley - 2009 - Studia Philosophica Estonica 2 (2):177-195.
    Standard philosophical methodology which proceeds by appeal to intuitions accessible "from the armchair" has come under criticism on the basis of empirical work indicating unanticipated variability of such intuitions. Loose constitutivity---the idea that intuitions are partly, but not strictly, constitutive of the concepts that appear in them---offers an interesting line of response to this empirical challenge. On a loose constitutivist view, it is unlikely that our intuitions are incorrect across the board, since they partly fix the facts in question. But (...)
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  42. American Space/American Place Geographies of the Contemporary United States.John A. Agnew & Jonathan M. Smith - 2002
  43.  28
    Living with innateness (and environmental dependence too).Jonathan M. Weinberg & Ron Mallon - 2008 - Philosophical Psychology 21 (3):415 – 424.
    Griffiths and Machery contend that the concept of innateness should be dispensed with in the sciences. We contend that, once that concept is properly understood as what we have called 'closed process invariance', it is still of significant use in the sciences, especially cognitive science.
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  44.  7
    Disclosing Controversial Risk in Informed Consent: How Serious is Serious?Jonathan M. Kocarnik - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (4):13-14.
  45.  34
    Why cosmoipolitanism in a post-secular age? Taylor and Habermas on European vs American exceptionalism.Jonathan M. Bowman - 2012 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 38 (2):127-147.
    While Taylor and Habermas respectively follow communitarian vs cosmopolitan lines in their political theories, trends in each of their writings on religion in a global context have taken surprising turns toward convergence. However, what both views lack would be a further analytical and normative classification that better captures the pluralistic dimensions of this shared turn. I consider Taylor’s critique of Habermas’ appeals to constitutional patriotism that lead to recanting the exceptionalist thesis attributed to the USA in order to own up (...)
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  46. Empirical challenges to the use of intuitions as evidence in philosophy, or why we are not “judgment skeptics”.Stephen Stich & Jonathan M. Weinberg - unknown
    Bealer, G. (1998). “Intuition and the Autonomy of Philosophy,” in M. DePaul & W. Ramsey, eds., Rethinking Intuition: The Psychology of Intuition and Its Role in Philosophical Inquiry, Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.
     
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  47.  20
    Time-binding communication: Transmission and decadence of tradition.Jonathan M. Smith - 2007 - Ethics, Place and Environment 10 (1):107 – 119.
    This article sketches a theory of time-binding communication, which is to say communication that unifies widely separated times much as space-binding communication unifies widely separated places. Drawing from the work of Harold Innis, it first describes the function and character of time-binding communication as a means to social continuity. Then, following Alasdair MacIntyre and Michael Oakshott, it explains the nature and necessary circumstances of this sort of time-binding communication, or tradition. It discusses the character, consequences, and causes of decadence - (...)
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  48.  22
    Holiness in Excess: Between Holiness and Metaphysics in the Wake of Rowan Williams.Jonathan M. Platter - 2021 - Heythrop Journal 62 (5):916-927.
    Rowan Williams has consistently given expression to Christian faith in surprising and genera-tive ways, especially through the language of ‘excess’ and through contemplating the excess in the narrative and identity of Christ. By attending to the grammar of excess, this essay draws out elements of the metaphysics of holiness in dialogue with Williams. I ask how creaturely being can be sustained by the holiness which generates all things without leaving holiness so ubiq-uitous as to be either trivial or hidden. I (...)
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  49. Repairing moral injury takes a team: what clinicians can learn from combat veterans.Jonathan M. Cahill, Warren Kinghorn & Lydia Dugdale - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    Moral injury results from the violation of deeply held moral commitments leading to emotional and existential distress. The phenomenon was initially described by psychologists and psychiatrists associated with the US Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs but has since been applied more broadly. Although its application to healthcare preceded COVID-19, healthcare professionals have taken greater interest in moral injury since the pandemic’s advent. They have much to learn from combat veterans, who have substantial experience in identifying and addressing moral injury—particularly (...)
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  50.  71
    Liberty as a right.Jonathan M. Riley - 2009 - The Philosophers' Magazine 46 (46):46-52.
    The simple principle of individual liberty evidently does identify particular rights as rights which ought to be recognised and enforced by the laws and customs of every civil society, namely, the rights of self-regarding liberty and individuality. If sex between consenting adults is purely self-regarding conduct under some conditions, for instance, then adults should have a right to spontaneously engage in sex under those conditions if they wish.
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