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  1.  48
    Henry David Thoreau's Anti‐Work Spirituality and a New Theological Ethic of Work.Jonathan Malesic - 2017 - Journal of Religious Ethics 45 (2):309-329.
    Although Henry David Thoreau stands outside the Christian canon, his outlook on the relations among spirituality, ecology, and economy highlights how Christian theologians can develop a theological work ethic in our era of economic and ecological precarity. He can furthermore help theologians counter the pro-work bias in much Christian thought. In Walden, Thoreau shows that the best work is an ascetic practice that reveals and reaps the abundance of nature and connects the person to the immanent divine and thereby glimpsing (...)
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  2.  15
    “Nothing Is to Be Preferred to the Work of God”: Cultivating Monastic Detachment for a Postindustrial Work Ethic.Jonathan Malesic - 2015 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 35 (1):45-61.
    Traditional terms for theology of work, including co-creation and vocation, tend to overvalue work, abetting the alienating conditions of postindustrial labor. To develop a theology that can help workers make sense of work's expansion, abstractness, and precarity, this essay proposes a postindustrial ethic of selective detachment from work. The Benedictine tradition offers a model. According to the Benedictine Rule, monastic work is important as a penitential practice but is strictly circumscribed, with prescriptions to forestall overinvestment in work. By detaching themselves (...)
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  3. Illusion and Offense in Philosophical Fragments: Kierkegaard’s Inversion of Feuerbach’s Critique of Christianity. [REVIEW]Jonathan Malesic - 2007 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 62 (1):43 - 55.
    The article shows the "Appendix" to Søren Kierkegaard's "Philosophical Fragments" to be a response to Ludwig Feuerbach's critique of Christianity. While previous studies have detected some influence by Feuerbach on Kierkegaard, they have so far discovered little in the way of specific responses to Feuerbach's ideas in Kierkegaard's published works. The article first makes the historical argument that Kierkegaard was very likely reading Feuerbach's "Essence of Christianity" while he was writing "Philosophical Fragments", as several of Kierkegaard's journal entries from that (...)
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  4.  17
    Illusion and Offense in Philosophical Fragments: Kierkegaard’s Inversion of Feuerbach’s Critique of Christianity.Jonathan Malesic - 2007 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 62 (1):43-55.
    The article shows the "Appendix" to Søren Kierkegaard's "Philosophical Fragments" to be a response to Ludwig Feuerbach's critique of Christianity. While previous studies have detected some influence by Feuerbach on Kierkegaard, they have so far discovered little in the way of specific responses to Feuerbach's ideas in Kierkegaard's published works. The article first makes the historical argument that Kierkegaard was very likely reading Feuerbach's "Essence of Christianity" while he was writing "Philosophical Fragments", as several of Kierkegaard's journal entries from that (...)
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  5.  28
    COVID‐19 and Religious Ethics.Toni Alimi, Elizabeth L. Antus, Alda Balthrop-Lewis, James F. Childress, Shannon Dunn, Ronald M. Green, Eric Gregory, Jennifer A. Herdt, Willis Jenkins, M. Cathleen Kaveny, Vincent W. Lloyd, Ping-Cheung Lo, Jonathan Malesic, David Newheiser, Irene Oh & Aaron Stalnaker - 2020 - Journal of Religious Ethics 48 (3):349-387.
    The editors of the JRE solicited short essays on the COVID‐19 pandemic from a group of scholars of religious ethics that reflected on how the field might help them make sense of the complex religious, cultural, ethical, and political implications of the pandemic, and on how the pandemic might shape the future of religious ethics.
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  6.  14
    A Kenotic Struggle for Dignity.Jonathan Malesic - 2016 - Journal of Religious Ethics 44 (3):403-424.
    Although Booker T. Washington stands outside the theological canon, his writings offer a pragmatic theology that connects the desire for dignity to a kenotic Christology through an ethic of unceasing work. While Washington's project to improve the lives of African Americans in the Jim Crow–era South was severely compromised by political circumstances, problems within his theology of work made his project especially susceptible to those circumstances. The tragedy of Washington's theology stems from his making dignity contingent upon work being recognized (...)
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  7.  19
    Kierkegaard and Socrates: A Study in Philosophy and Faith – By Jacob Howland.Jonathan Malesic - 2007 - Modern Theology 23 (3):492-495.
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  8.  39
    Ronald M. Green: Kierkegaard and Kant on Time and Eternity: Mercer University Press, Macon, GA, 2011, 269 Pages, $50. [REVIEW]Jonathan Malesic - 2013 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 73 (2):157-160.
  9.  43
    The Paralyzing Instant.Jonathan Malesic - 2013 - Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (2):209-232.
    Kierkegaard in Fear and Trembling presents a reductio ad absurdum regarding the time-spans subject to moral evaluation. The text's classic dilemma depends on assuming that we only evaluate discrete, contextless instants. The pseudonymous author constantly seeks the single instant or moral “photograph” that indicates Abraham's status. Doing so, however, extracts scripture's moral legislation out from narrative, resulting in theological paralysis and thereby requiring an alternative temporal vocabulary for evaluating Abraham. Fear and Trembling contains an under-explored alternative that sets Abraham within (...)
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