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Jonathan Quong
University of Southern California
  1. Liberalism Without Perfection.Jonathan Quong - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    Liberalism without Perfection offers an introduction to the debate between liberal perfectionism and political liberalism. This book is a new account and defence of Rawlsian political liberalism, one of the most discussed, but widely misunderstood and criticized theories in contemporary political theory.
     
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  2. Killing in Self‐Defense.Jonathan Quong - 2009 - Ethics 119 (3):507-537.
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  3. Liability to Defensive Harm.Jonathan Quong - 2012 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 40 (1):45-77.
  4. What is the Point of Public Reason?Jonathan Quong - 2014 - Philosophical Studies 170 (3):545-553.
    Jerry Gaus is the most important philosopher of public reason since John Rawls. His path-breaking work on this topic has deeply influenced a large group of moral and political philosophers, a group to which I happily belong. In this short paper I examine one feature of the account developed in his incredibly rich and illuminating book, The Order of Public Reason.Gaus (2011), cited hereafter as OPR. I argue Gaus’s theory struggles to resolve a crucial question: how can we be confident (...)
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  5.  53
    Public Reason.Jonathan Quong - 2013 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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    Cultural Exemptions, Expensive Tastes, and Equal Opportunities.Jonathan Quong - 2006 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (1):53–71.
  7. The Rights of Unreasonable Citizens.Jonathan Quong - 2004 - Journal of Political Philosophy 12 (3):314–335.
  8. Agent-Relative Prerogatives to Do Harm.Jonathan Quong - 2016 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 10 (4):815-829.
    In this paper, I offer two arguments in support of the proposition that there are sometimes agent-relative prerogatives to impose harm on nonliable persons. The first argument begins with a famous case where most people intuitively agree it is permissible to perform an act that results in an innocent person’s death, and where there is no liability-based or consequentialist justification for acting. I show that this case is relevantly analogous to a case involving the intentional imposition of lethal defensive harm (...)
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  9.  77
    Necessity, Moral Liability, and Defensive Harm.Joanna Mary Firth & Jonathan Quong - 2012 - Law and Philosophy 31 (6):673-701.
    A person who is liable to defensive harm has forfeited his rights against the imposition of the harm, and so is not wronged if that harm is imposed. A number of philosophers, most notably Jeff McMahan, argue for an instrumental account of liability, whereby a person is liable to defensive harm when he is either morally or culpably responsible for an unjust threat of harm to others, and when the imposition of defensive harm is necessary to avert the threatened unjust (...)
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    Proportionality, Liability, and Defensive Harm.Jonathan Quong - 2015 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 43 (2):144-173.
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    I—Rights Against Harm.Jonathan Quong - 2015 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 89 (1):249-266.
    Some philosophers defend the fact-relative view of moral rights against harm:Whether B infringes A's right not to be harmed by ϕ-ing depends on what will in fact occur if B ϕs. B's knowledge of, or evidence about, the exact consequences of her ϕ-ing are irrelevant to the question of whether her ϕ-ing constitutes an infringement of A's right not to be harmed by B.In this paper I argue that the fact-relative view of moral rights is mistaken, and I argue for (...)
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  12. Justice Beyond Equality.Jonathan Quong - 2010 - Social Theory and Practice 36 (2):315-340.
    This essay reviews G.A. Cohen’s final major work, Rescuing Justice and Equality. In the book, Cohen challenges the Rawlsian account of the content and the concept of justice. This essay offers a summary of Cohen’s main arguments, and develops objections to several of those arguments, particularly Cohen’s claim that his proposed egalitarian ethos is not vulnerable to a well-known trilemma (liberty, equality, efficiency) that might be pressed against it. The essay’s final section offers critical reflections on the important differences between (...)
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  13. Liberalism Without Perfection: Replies to Gaus, Colburn, Chan, and Bocchiola.Jonathan Quong - 2012 - Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche 2 (1):51-79.
  14. Disagreement, Asymmetry, and Liberal Legitimacy.Jonathan Quong - 2005 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 4 (3):301-330.
    Reasonable people disagree deeply about the nature of the good life. But reasonable people also disagree fundamentally about principles of justice. If this is true, then why does political liberalism permit the state to act on reasons of justice, but not for reasons grounded in conceptions of the good life? There appears to be an indefensible asymmetry in the way political liberalism treats disagreements about justice and disagreements about the good life. This is the asymmetry objection to political liberalism. The (...)
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  15. Contractualism, Reciprocity, and Egalitarian Justice.Jonathan Quong - 2007 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 6 (1):75-105.
    Can contractualism yield a suitably egalitarian conception of social justice? G.A. Cohen has forcefully argued that it cannot - that one cannot be both a contractualist and an egalitarian. Cohen presents a number of arguments to this effect, the particular target of which is John Rawls’s version of contractualism. In this article, I show that, contra Cohen, the Rawlsian model of contractualism, and the ideal of reciprocity on which it relies, can coherently yield egalitarian principles of distributive justice such as (...)
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    Are Identity Claims Bad for Deliberative Democracy?Jonathan Quong - 2002 - Contemporary Political Theory 1 (3):307-327.
    Identity claims are a common feature of political debate in many Western democracies. Cultural, linguistic, and religious minorities often defend or attack particular political proposals by appealing to the effect the proposal will have on their group's identity. Is this form of reasoning compatible with the normative ideal of deliberative democracy? This article examines and refutes two powerful arguments recently advanced in the literature which suggest the answer is no. First, there is the public reason objection, which holds that identity (...)
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  17. Left-Libertarianism: Rawlsian Not Luck Egalitarian.Jonathan Quong - 2011 - Journal of Political Philosophy 19 (1):64-89.
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    A Comment on Ripstein's Reclamation.Jonathan Quong - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (1):32-37.
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    Liberalism Without Perfection. A Précis.Jonathan Quong - 2012 - Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche 2 (1).
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  20.  35
    Disputed Practices and Reasonable Pluralism.Jonathan Quong - 2004 - Res Publica 10 (1):43-67.
    This paper addresses the problem of disputed cultural practices within liberal, deliberative democracies, arguing against the currently dominant view, advocated by Susan Okin among others, that such problems represent a fundamental tension between two liberal values: gender equality and cultural autonomy. Such an approach, I argue, requires the state to render normative judgements about conceptions of the good life, something which is both arbitrary and unfair in societies characterised by reasonable pluralism. Disputed practices, I claim, are defined by the existence (...)
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  21. Anthony Simon Laden, Reasonably Radical: Deliberative Liberalism and the Politics of Identity Reviewed By.Jonathan Quong - 2002 - Philosophy in Review 22 (6):419-421.
  22. Chandran Kukathas, The Liberal Archipelago: A Theory of Diversity and Freedom Reviewed By.Jonathan Quong - 2003 - Philosophy in Review 23 (5):347-349.
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    Equality, Responsibility, and Culture: A Comment on Alan Patten’s Equal Recognition.Jonathan Quong - 2015 - Les ateliers de l'éthique/The Ethics Forum 10 (2):157-168.
    Jonathan Quong | : Alan Patten presents his account of minority rights as broadly continuous with Ronald Dworkin’s theory of equality of resources. This paper challenges this claim. I argue that, contra Patten, Dworkin’s theory does not provide a basis to offer accommodations or minority rights, as a matter of justice, to some citizens who find themselves at a relative disadvantage in pursuing their plans of life after voluntarily changing their cultural or religious commitments. | : Alan Patten considère que (...)
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    Introduction to the Symposium on Fabre’s Cosmopolitan War.Jonathan Quong - 2014 - Law and Philosophy 33 (3):265-280.
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    Liberalism Without Perfection: Replies to Lister, Kulenovic, Zoffoli, Zelic, and Baccarini.Jonathan Quong - 2014 - Filozofija I Društvo 25 (1):96-122.
    I would like to begin by thanking all the contributors to this symposium, especially Elvio Baccarini, who hosted the conference at the University of Rijeka where several of the papers in this symposium were initially presented. I?ve learned a great deal from these essays, and I?m very fortunate for my work to be the subject of such careful and perceptive philosophical attention. Below I offer some replies to each contributor, though I do not address all the important points raised in (...)
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    On Flanigan’s Pharmaceutical Freedom.Jonathan Quong - forthcoming - HEC Forum:1-12.
    This paper discusses Jessica Flanigan’s book, Pharmaceutical Freedom. The paper advances two main claims. First, the paper argues that, despite what Flanigan claims, there is a coherent way to endorse the Doctrine of Informed Consent while resisting the view that there is a right to self-medicate. Second, the paper argues that Flanigan is committed to a more radical conclusion than she acknowledges in the book; namely, that under some conditions it is morally permissible for people to take medications from drug (...)
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    On Laborde’s Liberalism.Jonathan Quong - forthcoming - Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-13.
    This paper discusses Cécile Laborde’s book, Liberalism’s Religion. First, I pose some questions about how Laborde’s central proposal—disaggregating religion—is meant to solve the two most serious challenges that she argues confront existing liberal egalitarian theories. Second, I respond to some of the objections Laborde presses against my conception of political liberalism. Third, I argue that Laborde is mistaken in adopting accessibility as the appropriate standard for reasons within public justification. Finally, I suggest that Laborde’s view is, in the end, too (...)
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    Political Liberalism Without Scepticism.Jonathan Quong - 2007 - Ratio 20 (3):320–340.
    Political liberalism famously requires that fundamental political matters should not be decided by reference to any controversial moral, religious or philosophical doctrines over which reasonable people disagree. This means we, as citizens, must abstain from relying on what we believe to be the whole truth when debating or voting on fundamental political matters. Many critics of political liberalism contend that this requirement to abstain from relying on our views about the good life commits political liberalism to a kind of scepticism: (...)
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    Review: Kok-Chor Tan, Justice, Institutions, and Luck: The Site, Ground, and Scope of Equality. [REVIEW]Jonathan Quong - forthcoming - Philosophical Explorations.
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    Symposium on Settlement, Borders, and Violence.Jonathan Quong & Andrew Williams - 2017 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 16 (4):349-350.
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    Tan, Kok-Chor. Justice, Institutions, and Luck: The Site, Ground, and Scope of Equality.Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012. Pp. 208. $55.00. [REVIEW]Jonathan Quong - 2014 - Ethics 124 (2):440-444.
  32. The Morality of Defensive Force.Jonathan Quong - 2020 - Oxford University Press.
    When is it morally permissible to engage in self-defense or the defense of others? Jonathan Quong gives an original philosophical account of the central moral principles that should regulate the use of defensive force. The morality of defensive force needs to be understood in the context of a more general account of justice and moral rights.
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