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Joost Hengstmengel [3]Joost W. Hengstmengel [2]
  1.  89
    In Pursuit of the Rarest of Birds: An Interview with Gilbert Faccarello.Gilbert Faccarello, Joost Hengstmengel & Thomas R. Wells - 2014 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 7 (1):86-108.
    GILBERT JEAN FACCARELLO (Paris, 1950) is professor of economics at Université Panthéon-Assas, Paris, and a member of the Triangle research centre (École Normale Supérieure de Lyon and CNRS). He is presently chair of the ESHET Council (European Society for the History of Economic Thought). He completed his doctoral research in economics at Université de Paris X Nanterre. He has previously taught at the Université de Paris-Dauphine, Université du Maine and École Normale Supérieure de Fontenay/Saint-Cloud (now École Normale Supérieure de Lyon). (...)
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  2.  4
    ‘I Am Greatly Obliged to the Dutch’: James Beattie's Dutch Connection.Joost Hengstmengel - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (1):67-90.
    In the second half of the 18th century, Scottish Enlightenment philosophy spread to the Dutch Republic, where it found a favourable reception. The most popular Scottish philosopher among Dutch intellectuals arguably was James Beattie of Aberdeen. Almost all of his prose works were translated into Dutch, and the Zeeland Society of Sciences elected him a foreign honorary member. It made Beattie remark that he was ‘greatly obliged to the Dutch’, and a Dutch learned journal that he had ‘in a sense (...)
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  3.  3
    Review of Johan J. Graafland's The Market, Happiness, and Solidarity: A Christian Perspective. London/New York: Routledge, 2010, 186 Pp. [REVIEW]Joost Hengstmengel - 2011 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 4 (1):114.
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  4.  8
    The Reformation of Economic Thought Dutch Calvinist Economics, 1880–1948.Joost W. Hengstmengel - 2013 - Philosophia Reformata 78 (2):124-143.
    The first decades of the twentieth century saw the emergence of Calvinist economics in the Netherlands. This clearly normative approach to economics was inspired by Abraham Kuyper and was criticized by mainstream economists from the outset. It would eventually disappear under pressure of positive economics, but survived until at least the middle of the century. Calvinist economics itself was highly critical of classical economics and, unlike the neo-classical school, strove after an entire reformation of economic thought. Calvinists writers like T. (...)
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  5.  9
    The Survival of Aristotelianism in Early English Mercantilism: An Illustration From the Debate Between Malynes and Misselden.Joost W. Hengstmengel - 2017 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 10 (1):64-82.
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