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  1.  6
    Virtues and Principles in Biomedical Ethics.Jorge L. A. Garcia - 2020 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 45 (4-5):471-503.
    In the seventh and most recent edition of their classic book, Principles of Biomedical Ethics, Tom Beauchamp and James Childress define a virtue as a character trait that is “socially valuable and reliably present” and a moral virtue as such a trait that is also both “dispositional” and “morally valuable”. The virtues that they single out as “focal” within biomedical ethics are compassion, discernment, trustworthiness, integrity, and conscientiousness. Not all is well in their treatment of virtue. Beauchamp and Childress seem (...)
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    Current Conceptions of Racism: A Critical Examination of Some Recent Social Philosophy.Jorge L. A. Garcia - 1997 - Journal of Social Philosophy 28 (2):5-42.
  3.  35
    The New Critique of Anti-Consequentialist Moral Theory.Jorge L. A. Garcia - 1993 - Philosophical Studies 71 (1):1 - 32.
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  4. The Heart of Racism.Jorge L. A. Garcia - 1996 - In Bernard Boxill (ed.), Race and Racism. Oxford University Press.
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  5. Double Effect.Jorge L. A. Garcia - 1995 - Encyclopedia of Bioethics 4:636-40.
     
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  6.  35
    Beyond Biophobic Medical Ethics.Jorge L. A. Garcia - 1999 - The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 1:179-188.
    A genuine bioethics would be fiercely devoted to human life (bios) and would express that devotion by articulating as well as advocating moral virtues that rigorously protect that value against the temptation to see life in purely instrumental terms. In my view, no genuine bioethics exists today. In what follows, I will question two fundamental assumptions often presumed in discussions of euthanasia and assisted suicide. These are (i) the agent does will her victim (i.e., her putative beneficiary) some significant human (...)
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