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José Jorge Mendoza
University of Massachusetts, Lowell
  1.  83
    The Contradiction of Crimmigation.José Jorge Mendoza - 2018 - APA Newsletter on Hispanic/Latino Issues in Philosophy 17 (2):6-9.
    This essay argues that we should find Crimmigration, which is the collapsing of immigration law with criminal law, morally problematic for three reasons. First, it denies those who are facing criminal penalties important constitutional protections. Second, it doubly punishes those who have already served their criminal sentence with an added punishment that should be considered cruel and unusual (i.e., indefinite imprisonment or exile). Third, when the tactics aimed at protecting and serving local communities get usurped by the federal government for (...)
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  2. Introduction to the Ethics of Illegality.José Jorge Mendoza - 2009 - Oregon Review of International Law 11 (1):123-128.
    In this article I use the tropes of El Cucuy (the Mexican version of the boogyman), La Llorona (the wailer), and La Migra (the border patrol) to provide the beginnings of an ethical critique of the treatment of undocumented immigrants in the United States.
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  3. Enforcement Matters: Reframing the Philosophical Debate Over Immigration.José Jorge Mendoza - 2015 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 29 (1):73-90.
    In debating the ethics of immigration, philosophers have focused much of their attention on determining whether a political community ought to have the discretionary right to control immigration. They have not, however, given the same amount of consideration to determining whether there are any ethical limits on how a political community enforces its immigration policy. This article, therefore, offers a different approach to immigration justice. It presents a case against legitimate states having discretionary control over immigration by showing both how (...)
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  4.  73
    Latinx and the Future of Whiteness in American Democracy.José Jorge Mendoza - 2017 - APA Newsletter on Hispanic/Latino Issues in Philosophy 16 (2):6-10.
    Given the oncoming demographic changes—which are primarily driven by the growth in the Latinx community—the United States is predicted to become a minority-majority country by around 2050. This seems to suggest that electoral strategies that employ “dog-whistle” politics are destined for the dust-bin of history. Following the work of critical race theorists, such as Ian Haney-Lopez and Derrick Bell, I want to suggest that pronouncing the inevitable demise of dog-whistle politics is premature. This is because there are reasons to suspect (...)
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  5. Latino/a Immigration: A Refutation of the Social Trust Argument.José Jorge Mendoza - 2015 - In Harald Bauder & Christian Matheis (eds.), Migration Policy and Practice: Interventions and Solutions. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 37-57.
    The social trust argument asserts that a political community cannot survive without social trust, and that social trust cannot be achieved or maintained without a political community having discretionary control over immigration. Various objections have already been raised against this argument, but because those objections all assume various liberal commitments they leave the heart of the social trust argument untouched. This chapter argues that by looking at the socio-historical circumstances of Latino/as in the United States, an inherent weakness of the (...)
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  6. Introduction to Special Issue.Grant J. Silva & José Jorge Mendoza - 2015 - Public Affairs Quarterly 29 (2):135-137.
  7.  15
    Philosophy of Race and the Ethics of Immigration.José Jorge Mendoza - 2018 - In Paul C. Taylor, Linda Martín Alcoff & Luvell Anderson (eds.), The Routledge Companion to the Philosophy of Race. Routledge.
    In this chapter I attempt to provide a general overview of the philosophical literature on immigration from both an ethics of immigration and philosophy of race perspective. I then try to make the case that putting these two literatures into conversation would be fruitful. In particular, that it could provide an underappreciated argument for limiting the discretion states are normally thought to enjoy with respect to immigration.
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  8. Does Cosmopolitan Justice Ever Require Restrictions on Migration?José Jorge Mendoza - 2015 - Public Affairs Quarterly 29 (2):175-186.
    In this essay, I argue that even when they appear to help, restrictions on migration are usually only an impediment, not an aid, to cosmopolitan justice. Even though some egalitarian cosmopolitans are well intentioned in their support of migration restrictions, I argue that migration restrictions are (i) not truly cosmopolitan and (ii) will not have the kinds of consequences they expect. My argument in defense of this claim begins, in section 1, by outlining a defense of migration restrictions based on (...)
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  9. Doing Away with Juan Crow: Two Standards for Just Immigration Reform.José Jorge Mendoza - 2015 - APA Newsletter on Hispanic/Latino Issues in Philosophy 15 (2):14-20.
    In 2008 Robert Lovato coined the phrase Juan Crow. Juan Crow is a type of policy or enforcement of immigration laws that discriminate against Latino/as in the United States. This essay looks at the implications this phenomenon has for an ethics of immigration. It argues that Juan Crow, like its predecessor Jim Crow, is not merely a condemnation of federalism, but of any immigration reform that has stricter enforcement as one of its key components. Instead of advocating for increased enforcement, (...)
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  10. Neither a State of Nature nor a State of Exception.José Jorge Mendoza - 2011 - Radical Philosophy Review 14 (2):187-195.
    Since at least the second half of the 19th century, the U.S. federal government has enjoyed “plenary power” over its immigration policy. Plenary power allows the federal government to regulate immigration free of judicial review and thereby, with regard to immigration cases, minimize the Constitutional protections afforded to non-citizens. The justification for granting the U.S federal government such broad powers comes from a certain understanding of sovereignty; one where limiting sovereign authority in cases like immigration could potentially undermine its legitimacy (...)
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  11.  42
    Illegal: White Supremacy and Immigration Status.Jose Jorge Mendoza - 2016 - In Alex Sager (ed.), The Ethics and Politics of Immigration: Core Issues and Emerging Trends. London, UK: Rowman & Littlefield International. pp. 201-220.
    This chapter looks at the history of US citizenship and immigration law and argues that denying admission or citizenship status to certain groups of people is closely correlated to a denial of whiteness. On this account whiteness is not a fixed or natural concept, but instead is a social construction whose composition changes throughout time and place. Understanding whiteness in this way allows one to see how white supremacy is not limited merely to instances of racism or ethnocentrism, but can (...)
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  12. Discrimination and the Presumptive Rights of Immigrants.José Jorge Mendoza - 2014 - Critical Philosophy of Race 2 (1):68-83.
    Philosophers have assumed that as long as discriminatory admission and exclusion policies are off the table, it is possible for one to adopt a restrictionist position on the issue of immigration without having to worry that this position might entail discriminatory outcomes. The problem with this assumption emerges, however,when two important points are taken into consideration. First, immigration controls are not simply discriminatory because they are based on racist or ethnocentric attitudes and beliefs, but can themselves also be the source (...)
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  13. The Political Philosophy of Unauthorized Immigration.José Jorge Mendoza - 2011 - APA Newsletter on Hispanic/Latino Issues in Philosophy 10 (2):2-6.
    In this article, I broadly sketch out the current philosophical debate over immigration and highlight some of its shortcomings. My contention is that the debate has been too focused on border enforcement and therefore has left untouched one of the more central issue of this debate: what to do with unauthorized immigrants who have already crossed the border and with the “push and pull” factors that have created this situation. After making this point, I turn to the work of Enrique (...)
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  14.  7
    Discrimination and Immigration.José Jorge Mendoza - 2018 - In Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of the Ethics of Discrimination. Routledge.
    In this chapter, I outline what philosophers working on the ethics of immigration have had to say with regard to invidious discrimination. In doing so, I look at both instances of direct discrimination, by which I mean discrimination that is explicitly stated in official immigration policy, and indirect discrimination, by which I mean cases where the implementation or enforcement of facially “neutral” policies nonetheless generate invidious forms of discrimination. The end goal of this chapter is not necessarily to take a (...)
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  15.  22
    Does "Sí Se Puede" Translate To "Yes We Can"?José Jorge Mendoza - 2011 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 18 (2):60-69.
    Philosophers of the American tradition should be more proactive in their inclusion of Latino/a thinkers, even when the work of these thinkers does not directly connect back to classical tradition of American philosophy. This argument has two mterrelated parts. First, if the American philosophical tradition is committed to a social and political philosophy that begins from "lived-experience," then one area it has largely overlooked is the Latino/a experience. Second, if the contributions of the Latino/a community go unrecognized as a part (...)
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  16.  87
    Three Reasons for Knowing Other Than Knowing Otherwise: A Reply to Alexis Shotwell.José Jorge Mendoza - 2013 - PhaenEx 8 (1):267-275.
    In this article, I raise three potential objections to Alexis Shotwell’s view of “implicit knowledge,” which she presents in her book Knowing Otherwise.
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  17.  39
    Pragmatism in the Americas Ed. By Gregory Fernando Pappas (Review). [REVIEW]José Jorge Mendoza - 2013 - The Pluralist 8 (2):121-127.
    At the University of Oregon, where I received my PhD, one of the requirements for advancing to doctoral candidacy was the completion of a History Paper. The History Paper challenges the student to bring together two philosophers from different philosophical traditions on a similar question and/or topic. The two philosophers that I chose for my History Paper were Latin American philosopher Enrique Dussel and the American philosopher John Dewey. As I began work on this project, I quickly realized that it (...)
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  18.  2
    A “Nation” of Immigrants.Jose Jorge Mendoza - 2010 - The Pluralist 5 (3):41.
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  19.  51
    A "Nation" of Immigrants.José Jorge Mendoza - 2010 - The Pluralist 5 (3):41-48.
    In "Nations of Immigrants: Do Words Matter?" Donna Gabaccia provides an illuminating account of the origin of the United States' claim to be a "Nation of Immigrants." Gabaccia's endeavor is motivated by the question "What difference does it make if we call someone a foreigner, an immigrant, an emigrant, a migrant, a refugee, an alien, an exile or an illegal or clandestine?" . This question is very important to the immigration debate because, as Gabaccia goes on to show, "[t]o ponder (...)
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  20.  17
    Review Pragmatism in the Americas Pappas Gregory Fernando Fordham UP New York. [REVIEW]José Jorge Mendoza - 2013 - The Pluralist 8 (2):121-127.
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  21.  16
    5. 'Bi-Polar' Emerson: 'Nominalist and Realist' (Pp. 78-105).Joseph Urbas, Adam Glover, Jorge Je Gracia, Justin Bell, José Jorge Mendoza, David W. Rodick & Sami Pihlström - 2013 - The Pluralist 8 (2):78-105.
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  22.  2
    Immigration: The Missing Requirement for an Ethics of Race.José Jorge Mendoza - 2012 - Radical Philosophy Review 15 (2):359-364.
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  23.  4
    Guest Editors' Introduction.Brandon Absher, Anatole Anton & José Jorge Mendoza - 2012 - Radical Philosophy Review 15 (1):1-6.
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  24. Introduction.José Jorge Mendoza - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (3):679-680.
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  25.  18
    The Moral and Political Philosophy of Immigration: Liberty, Security, and Equality.José Jorge Mendoza - 2016 - Lexington Books.
    José Jorge Mendoza argues that the difficulty with resolving the issue of immigration is primarily a conflict over competing moral and political principles and is, at its core, a problem of philosophy. This book brings into dialogue various contemporary philosophical texts that deal with immigration to provide some normative guidance to immigration policy and reform.
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