6 found
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  1.  52
    Neurobiological Roots of Language in Primate Audition: Common Computational Properties.Ina Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Matthias Schlesewsky, Steven L. Small & Josef P. Rauschecker - 2015 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (3):142-150.
  2.  19
    Distinct Cortical Locations for Integration of Audiovisual Speech and the McGurk Effect.Laura C. Erickson, Brandon A. Zielinski, Jennifer E. V. Zielinski, Guoying Liu, Peter E. Turkeltaub, Amber M. Leaver & Josef P. Rauschecker - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
  3.  17
    Frontostriatal Gating of Tinnitus and Chronic Pain.Josef P. Rauschecker, Elisabeth S. May, Audrey Maudoux & Markus Ploner - 2015 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (10):567-578.
  4.  27
    Response to Skeide and Friederici: The Myth of the Uniquely Human ‘Direct’ Dorsal Pathway.Ina Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Matthias Schlesewsky, Steven L. Small & Josef P. Rauschecker - 2015 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (9):484-485.
  5.  18
    Reverberations of Hebbian Thinking.Josef P. Rauschecker - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):642-643.
    Cortical reverberations may induce synaptic changes that underlie developmental plasticity as well as long-term memory. They may be especially important for the consolidation of synaptic changes. Reverberations in cortical networks should have particular significance during development, when large numbers of new representations are formed. This includes the formation of representations across different sensory modalities.
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  6.  18
    Vocal Gestures and Auditory Objects.Josef P. Rauschecker - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):143-144.
    Recent studies in human and nonhuman primates demonstrate that auditory objects, including speech sounds, are identified in anterior superior temporal cortex projecting directly to inferior frontal regions and not along a posterior pathway, as classically assumed. By contrast, the role of posterior temporal regions in speech and language remains largely unexplained, although a concept of vocal gestures may be helpful.
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