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Joseph A. Stramondo
San Diego State University
  1. The Complicated Relationship of Disability and Well-Being.Stephen M. Campbell & Joseph A. Stramondo - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (2):151-184.
    It is widely assumed that disability is typically a bad thing for those who are disabled. Our purpose in this essay is to critique this view and defend a more nuanced picture of the relationship between disability and well-being. We first examine four interpretations of the above view and argue that it is false on each interpretation. We then ask whether disability is thereby a neutral trait. Our view is that most disabilities are neutral in one sense, though we cannot (...)
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  2. Disability Rights as a Necessary Framework for Crisis Standards of Care and the Future of Health Care.Laura Guidry-Grimes, Katie Savin, Joseph A. Stramondo, Joel Michael Reynolds, Marina Tsaplina, Teresa Blankmeyer Burke, Angela Ballantyne, Eva Feder Kittay, Devan Stahl, Jackie Leach Scully, Rosemarie Garland-Thomson, Anita Tarzian, Doron Dorfman & Joseph J. Fins - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (3):28-32.
    In this essay, we suggest practical ways to shift the framing of crisis standards of care toward disability justice. We elaborate on the vision statement provided in the 2010 Institute of Medicine (National Academy of Medicine) “Summary of Guidance for Establishing Crisis Standards of Care for Use in Disaster Situations,” which emphasizes fairness; equitable processes; community and provider engagement, education, and communication; and the rule of law. We argue that interpreting these elements through disability justice entails a commitment to both (...)
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  3.  61
    Why Bioethics Needs a Disability Moral Psychology.Joseph A. Stramondo - 2016 - Hastings Center Report 46 (3):22-30.
    The deeply entrenched, sometimes heated conflict between the disability movement and the profession of bioethics is well known and well documented. Critiques of prenatal diagnosis and selective abortion are probably the most salient and most sophisticated of disability studies scholars’ engagements with bioethics, but there are many other topics over which disability activists and scholars have encountered the field of bioethics in an adversarial way, including health care rationing, growth-attenuation interventions, assisted reproduction technology, and physician-assisted suicide. The tension between the (...)
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  4.  39
    Disability and the Damaging Master Narrative of an Open Future.Joseph A. Stramondo - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (S1):S30-S36.
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  5.  33
    The Distinction Between Curative and Assistive Technology.Joseph A. Stramondo - 2019 - Science and Engineering Ethics 25 (4):1125-1145.
    Disability activists have sometimes claimed their disability has actually increased their well-being. Some even say they would reject a cure to keep these gains. Yet, these same activists often simultaneously propose improvements to the quality and accessibility of assistive technology. However, for any argument favoring assistive over curative technology to work, there must be a coherent distinction between the two. This line is already vague and will become even less clear with the emergence of novel technologies. This paper asks and (...)
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  6.  5
    How Disability Activism Advances Disability Bioethics.Joseph A. Stramondo - 2022 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 25 (2):335-349.
    In this paper, I argue that, even when disability rights activists are most clearly acting as activists, they can advance the scholarly activity of disability bioethics. In particular, I will argue that even engaging in non-violent direct action, including civil disobedience, is an important way in which disability rights activists directly support the efforts of disability bioethics scholars. I will begin by drawing upon Hilde Lindemann’s work on relational narrative identity to describe how certain damaging master narratives about disability hinder (...)
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  7.  43
    How to (Consistently) Reject the Options Argument.Stephen M. Campbell, Joseph A. Stramondo & David Wasserman - 2021 - Utilitas 33 (2):237-245.
    It is commonly thought that disability is a harm or “bad difference” because having a disability restricts valuable options in life. In his recent essay “Disability, Options and Well-Being,” Thomas Crawley offers a novel defense of this style of reasoning and argues that we and like-minded critics of this brand of argument are guilty of an inconsistency. Our aim in this article is to explain why our view avoids inconsistency, to challenge Crawley's positive defense of the Options Argument, and to (...)
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  8.  35
    Bioethics, Adaptive Preferences, and Judging the Quality of a Life with Disability.Joseph A. Stramondo - 2021 - Social Theory and Practice 47 (1):199-220.
    Both mainstream and disability bioethics sometimes contend that the self-assessment of disabled people about their own well-being is distorted by adaptive preferences that are only held because other, better options are unavailable. I will argue that both of the most common ways of understanding adaptive preferences—the autonomy-based account and the well-being account—would reject blanket claims that disabled people’s QOL self-assessment has been distorted, whether those claims come from mainstream bioethicists or from disability bioethicists. However, rejecting these generalizations for a more (...)
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  9.  8
    Why Bioethics Needs a Disability Moral Psychology.Joseph A. Stramondo - 2016 - Hastings Center Report 46 (3):22-30.
    The deeply entrenched, sometimes heated conflict between the disability movement and the profession of bioethics is well known and well documented. Critiques of prenatal diagnosis and selective abortion are probably the most salient and most sophisticated of disability studies scholars’ engagements with bioethics, but there are many other topics over which disability activists and scholars have encountered the field of bioethics in an adversarial way, including health care rationing, growth-attenuation interventions, assisted reproduction technology, and physician-assisted suicide. -/- The tension between (...)
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  10.  15
    The right to assistive technology.Joseph A. Stramondo - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (5):247-271.
    In this paper, I argue that disabled people have a right to assistive technology, but this right cannot be grounded simply in a broader right to health care or in a more comprehensive view like the capabilities approach to justice. Both of these options are plagued by issues that I refer to as the problem of constriction, where the theory does not justify enough of the AT that disabled people should have access to, and the problem of overextension, where the (...)
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  11. How an Ideology of Pity Is a Social Harm to People with Disabilities.Joseph A. Stramondo - 2010 - Social Philosophy Today 26:121-134.
    In academic philosophy and popular culture alike, pity is often framed as a virtue or the emotional underpinnings of virtue. Yet, people who are the most marginalized and, hence, most often on the receiving end of pity, assert that it is anything but an altruism. How can we explain this disconnect between an understanding of pity as a virtuous emotion versus a social harm? My paper answers this question by showing how pity is not only an emotion, but also a (...)
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  12.  77
    Review of Elizabeth Barnes, The Minority Body. [REVIEW]Stephen M. Campbell & Joseph A. Stramondo - 2016 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
  13.  6
    Expressed Ableism.Stephen M. Campbell & Joseph A. Stramondo - forthcoming - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy.
    With increased frequency, reproductive technologies are placing prospective parents in the position of choosing whether to bring a disabled child into the world. The most well-known objection to the act of “selecting against disability” is known as the Expressivist Argument. The argument claims that such acts express a negative or disrespectful message about disabled people and that one has a moral reason to avoid sending such messages. We have two primary aims in this essay. The first is to critically examine (...)
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  14.  24
    How an Ideology of Pity Is a Social Harm to People with Disabilities.Joseph A. Stramondo - 2010 - Social Philosophy Today 26:121-134.
    In academic philosophy and popular culture alike, pity is often framed as a virtue or the emotional underpinnings of virtue. Yet, people who are the most marginalized and, hence, most often on the receiving end of pity, assert that it is anything but an altruism. How can we explain this disconnect between an understanding of pity as a virtuous emotion versus a social harm? My paper answers this question by showing how pity is not only an emotion, but also a (...)
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  15.  4
    Rethinking Systemic Ableism: A Response to Zagouras, Ellick, and Aulisio.Erin E. Andrews, Kara B. Ayers, Joseph A. Stramondo & Robyn M. Powell - forthcoming - Clinical Ethics:147775092210944.
    Introduction This article is a response to Zagouras, Ellick, and Aulisio who presented a case study justifying the questioning of the capacity and autonomy of a young woman with a physical disability who was pregnant and facing coercive pressure to terminate. Case description Julia is described as a 26-year-old woman with a neurological disability that requires her to receive assistance with activities of daily living. She was described as living with her parents who provided her with personal care assistance. Julia (...)
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  16.  73
    Causing Disability, Causing Non-Disability: What's the Moral Difference?Joseph A. Stramondo & Stephen M. Campbell - forthcoming - In Adam Cureton & David Wasserman (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Disability. Oxford University Press.
    It may seem obvious that causing disability in another person is morally problematic in a way that removing or preventing a disability is not. This suggests that there is a moral asymmetry between causing disability and causing non-disability. This chapter investigates whether there are any differences between these two types of actions that might explain the existence of a general moral asymmetry. After setting aside the possibility that having a disability is almost always bad or harmful for a person (a (...)
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  17.  75
    Disability and Well-Being: Appreciating the Complications.Stephen M. Campbell & Joseph A. Stramondo - 2016 - American Philosophical Association Newsletter on Philosophy and Medicine 16 (1):35-37.
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  18.  95
    Seeing the Forest Through the Trees: What the Radical Feminist Critique of Prostitution Can Teach Us About the Sale of Kidneys by Living Suppliers.Joseph A. Stramondo - 2013 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 6 (1):144-158.
    In his article "Markets and the Needy: Organ Sales or Aid?" T. L. Zutlevics briefly touches upon the conceptual link between the practice of living1 suppliers2 selling their kidneys and prostitutes selling sexual services. In an attempt to defuse Gerald Dworkin's (Dworkin 1993) appeals to autonomy that undergird his justification of establishing a controlled market in transplantable organs from living suppliers, Zutlevics writes:Whilst initially appealing, this argument is problematic in that it justifies a great deal more than allowing the poor (...)
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  19.  4
    Tragic Choices: Disability, Triage, and Equity Amidst a Global Pandemic.Joseph A. Stramondo - 2021 - Journal of Philosophy of Disability 1:201-210.
    In this paper, I make three arguments regarding Crisis Standards of Care developed during the COVID-19 pandemic. First, I argue against the consideration of third person quality of life judgments that deprioritize disabled or chronically ill people on a basis other than their survival, even if protocols use the language of health to justify maintaining the supposedly higher well-being of non-disabled people. Second, while it may be unavoidable that some disabled people are deprioritized by triage protocols that must consider the (...)
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    Shaping Our Selves: On Technology, Flourishing, and a Habit of Thinking, by Erik Parens. New York: Oxford University Press; 2014. 200 Pp. [REVIEW]Joseph A. Stramondo - 2016 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (3):536-539.
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  21.  15
    Doing Ethics From Experience: Pragmatic Suggestions for a Feminist Disability Advocate’s Response to Prenatal Diagnosis.Joseph A. Stramondo - 2011 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 4 (2):48-78.
    While disability theory and feminist theory share a great deal in their methodology and could potentially share quite a bit in their political commitments, there is a tension or conflict between these two approaches as they evaluate prenatal diagnosis. For the feminist disability advocate, this can be thought of as a type of ideological double bind. This paper will dissolve this tension by way of John Dewey’s version of American pragmatism. First, I will map out the landscape of the prenatal (...)
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  22.  6
    Seeing the Forest Through the Trees: What the Radical Feminist Critique of Prostitution Can Teach Us About the Sale of Kidneys by Living Suppliers.Joseph A. Stramondo - 2013 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 6 (1):144-158.
    Recent scholarship suggests that the practices of selling sex and selling kidneys can be understood as examples of serious harms that are sometimes chosen by autonomous individuals who find themselves in difficult straits. This analogy between kidney sales by live suppliers and prostitution deserves careful, rigorous consideration. Ideas about autonomy, paternalism, systemic oppression, commodification, and the human body are at the core of each controversy. This paper seeks to use the well-developed, radical feminist literature opposing prostitution and critiquing the liberal (...)
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