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Joseph Agassi
Tel Aviv University
  1.  4
    Ludwig Wittgenstein’s Philosophical Investigations: An Attempt at a Critical Rationalist Appraisal.Joseph Agassi - 2018 - Springer Verlag.
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  2. Prescriptions for Responsible Psychiatry.Joseph Agassi - 1996 - In William T. O'Donohue & Richard F. Kitchener (eds.), The Philosophy of Psychology. Sage Publications. pp. 339.
    The ills of psychiatry are currently diagnoses with the aid of deficient etiologies. The currently proposed prescriptions for psychiatry are practically impossible. The defective part of the profession is its leadership which in its very defensiveness sticks to the status quo, thereby owning the worst defects and impeding all possible cure. The current discussions of the matter are pretentious and thus woolly. The minimal requirement from the profession as a whole and from each of its individual members is that they (...)
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  3. Corroboration Versus Induction.Joseph Agassi - 1958 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 9 (33):311.
  4.  10
    ויקרא.Joseph Agassi - manuscript
    ספר ויקרא, או תורת כוהנים, נראה היום פחות מעניין מאשר ספרי-קודש אחרים, כי הוא ספר מצוות - הוא כולל כארבעים אחוז מכל תרי"ג המצוות - ואף במידה רבה מצוות שאינן בתוקף מאז חורבן בית-המקדש. אך יש בו עניין, שכן הוא מוכר כספר השלם ביותר מבחינת סגנונו ותכנו, ואולי אף בכך שעריכתו כנראה עתיקה ביותר - לא לדעת דון יצחק אברבנאל, שכן הוא לא הטיל בספק כי תורה נתנה למשה מפי הגבורה - אמנם לא בסיני אך בכל-זאת למשה מפי הגבורה. החוקרים (...)
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  5. Towards a Rational Philosophical Anthropology.Joseph Agassi - 1977 - M. Nijhoff.
  6.  30
    Science in Flux.Joseph Agassi - 1975 - D. Reidel Pub. Co..
  7.  14
    Institutions as a Philosophical Problem: A Critical Rationalist Perspective on Guala’s “Understanding Institutions” and His Critics.Joseph Agassi & Ian Jarvie - 2019 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 49 (1):42-63.
    The symposium on Francesco Guala’s Understanding Institutions was thought provoking. Five critical papers took issue with Guala’s reconciliation of the game-theoretical view of institutions and the rule-governed view. We offer some critical commentary that adopts a different perspective. We agree that institutions are central to social life and, thus, also to the social sciences; they are also prior to and more fundamental than individuals. We add some historical points on the ways previous philosophers thought about institutions, and we come at (...)
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  8. Book Review: Tacit and Explicit KnowledgeCollinsHarryTacit and Explicit Knowledge. Chicago: Chicago University Press, 2010. Xi + 182 Pp. ISBN 978-0-226-11308-7. [REVIEW]Joseph Agassi - 2013 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 43 (2):275-279.
  9.  43
    Kuhn’s Way.Joseph Agassi - 2002 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 32 (3):394-430.
  10. Paranoia: A Study in Diagnosis.Yehuda Fried, Joseph Agassi & Thomas Szasz - 1979 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 30 (2):177-182.
     
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  11. Williams Dodges Agassi's Criticism.Joseph Agassi - 1978 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 29 (3):248-252.
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  12. Sensationalism.Joseph Agassi - 1966 - Mind 75 (297):1-24.
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  13. Technology, Philosophical and Social Aspects.Joseph Agassi - 1985
  14.  72
    Testing as a Bootstrap Operation in Physics.Joseph Agassi - 1973 - Zeitschrift Für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 4 (1):1-24.
    Science uses its firmest conclusions to arrive at new ones which may well completely destroy these, previously firmest, conclusions. The perceptive may notice that when the previously firmest conclusions are demolished we may remain in the dark with no conclusion worth replacing it with. But only when we replace it with a firmer conclusion can we speak of a bootstrap operation rather than of a refutations. Often, to conclude, the ad hoc nature of a fact-like statement is rooted in the (...)
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  15. Variations on the Liar's Paradox.Joseph Agassi - 1964 - Studia Logica 15 (1):237-238.
    Line 1: The statement on line one is false. Line 2: All statements on line two are false. p and not-p Line 3: All statements on line 3 are true, or all of them are false. p and not-p Line 4: The statement on line 4 is false, or (p and not-p). Line 5: The statement on line 5 is true if and only if (p and not p). Line 6: All statements on line 6 are false. p. Line 7: (...)
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  16.  20
    The Problem of Analytic Philosophy*.Joseph Agassi & Ian C. Jarvie - 2019 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 49 (5):413-433.
    Dainton and Robinson’s Companion traces lines of descent of analytic philosophy from ancestors. They characterize analytic philosophy as a movement, a tradition, a style, and a commitment to the va...
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  17.  25
    Toward a Fictionless Liberalism.Joseph Agassi - 2016 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 46 (1):77-91.
    This Companion centers on the fictitious social contract that can be used to justify liberalism. As justification, the theory of the contract either fully justifies a regime as liberal or it fully condemns it as illiberal. This conflicts with the common recognition that liberalism is a matter of degree. John Rawls is taken as the leading light; yet at best the Companion manages to picture him as well-intended but hopelessly confusing.
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  18.  20
    Book Review: Raymond Aron’s Philosophy of Political Responsibility: Freedom, Democracy, and National Identity by Christopher Adair-Toteff. [REVIEW]Joseph Agassi - 2020 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 50 (1):82-88.
    Philosophy of the Social Sciences, Ahead of Print.
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  19.  57
    The Methodology of Research Projects: A Sketch.Joseph Agassi - 1977 - Zeitschrift Für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 8 (1):30-38.
    Summary There is a traditional reluctance among methodologists to study the ever increasingly important phenomenon of research-projects, research-project evaluations, etc. The reason for this is that projects are embedded in programs and programs in intellectual frameworks, or conceptual frameworks, or metaphysical systems. It sounds dogmatic to judge the product of research by a reference to a metaphysical system. Yet, first of all, it is not so dogmatic if judgment can go both ways, if we have competing systems at work, and (...)
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  20. Towards an Historiography of Science.Joseph Agassi - 1967 - Wesleyan University Press, 1967.
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  21.  56
    Who Discovered Boyle's Law?Joseph Agassi - 1977 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 8 (3):189.
  22.  74
    The Place of Metaphysics in the Historiography of Science.Joseph Agassi - 1996 - Foundations of Physics 26 (4):483-499.
    Legitimating the use of metaphysics in scientific research constituted a farreaching methodological revolution, invalidating the inductivist demands that science be guided by empirical information alone. Thus, science became tentative. The revolution was established when pioneering historians of science, Max Jammer among them, exhibited the working of metaphysics in scientific research. This raises many problems, since most metaphysical ideas are poor as compared with scientific ones. Yet taking science to be the effort to explain facts in a comprehensive manner, makes some (...)
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  23. Book Review: Paul Feyerabend: Ein Philosoph Aus Wien, Edited by F. Stadler and KR Fischer. [REVIEW]Joseph Agassi - forthcoming - Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
  24.  42
    Between Science and Technology.Joseph Agassi - 1980 - Philosophy of Science 47 (1):82-99.
    Basic research or fundamental research is distinct from both pure and applied research, in that it is pure research with expected useful results. The existence of basic or fundamental research is problematic, at least for both inductivists and instrumentalists, but also for Popper. Assuming scientific research to be the search for explanatory conjectures and for refutations, and assuming technology to be the search of conjectures and some corroborations, we can easily place basic or fundamental research between science and technology as (...)
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  25. Faraday as a Natural Philosopher.Joseph Agassi - 1971
     
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  26. To Save Verisimilitude.Joseph Agassi - 1981 - Mind 90 (360):576-579.
    JOSEPH AGASSI 1. Sir Karl Popper has offered two different theories of scientific progress, his theory of conjectures and refutations and corroboration, as well as his theory of verisimilitude increase. The former was attacked by some old-fashioned inductivists, yet is triumphant; the latter has been refuted by Tichy and by Miller to Popper’s own satisfaction. Oddly, however, the theory of verisimilitude was developed because of some deficiency in the theory of corroboration, and though in its present precise formulation it was (...)
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  27.  30
    The Philosophy of Common Sense.Joseph Agassi & John Wettersten - 1987 - Philosophia 17 (4):421-438.
    Philosophers wanted commonsense to fight skepticism. They hypostasized and destroyed it. Commonsense is skeptical--Bound by a sense of proportion and of limitation. A scarce commodity, At times supported, At times transcended by science, Commonsense has to be taken account of by the critical-Realistic theory of science. James clerk maxwell's view of today's science as tomorrow's commonsense is the point of departure. It is wonderful but overlooks the value of the sense of proportion.
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  28.  50
    Rationality and the Tu Quoque Argument.Joseph Agassi - 1973 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 16 (1-4):395 – 406.
    The tu quoque argument is the argument that since in the end rationalism rests on an irrational choice of and commitment to rationality, rationalism is as irrational as any other commitment. Popper's and Polanyi's philosophies of science both accept the argument, and have on that account many similarities; yet Popper manages to remain a rationalist whereas Polanyi decided for an irrationalist version of rationalism. This is more marked in works of their respective followers, W. W. Bartley III and Thomas S. (...)
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  29. Rationality: The Critical View.Joseph Agassi & I. C. Jarvie (eds.) - 1987 - Kluwer Academic Publishers.
  30.  12
    Auguste Comte and His Legacy.Joseph Agassi - 2019 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 49 (4):323-327.
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  31. Heidegger Made Simple (and Offensive).Joseph Agassi - 2004 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 34 (3):423-431.
    presents Heidegger as a devout mystic who viewed the Nazi Party as the sacred vessel of a divine message—even though, the author adds, his religion is secular and so it has no divinity and no immortal soul. Rickey sees him as a utopian. This makes some sense: the unique in the Shoah involves the unique descent of a highly cultured, enlightened nation to the rock bottom of barbarism. Ricky’s text belies his effort to exonerate Heidegger. Key Words: Rickey • Heidegger (...)
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  32.  34
    Verisimilitude.Joseph Agassi - 2011 - Discusiones Filosóficas 12 (19):61 - 86.
  33.  67
    Presuppositions for Logic.Joseph Agassi - 1982 - The Monist 65 (4):465-480.
    Positivists identify science and certainty and in the name of the utter rationality of science deny that it rests on speculative presuppositions. The Logical Positivists took a step further and tried to show such presuppositions really no presuppositions at all but rather poorly worded sentences. Rules of sentence formation, however, rest on the presuppositions about the nature of language. This makes us unable to determine the status of mathematics, which is these days particularly irksome since this question is now-since Abraham (...)
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  34.  59
    Subjectivism: From Infantile Disease to Chronic Illness.Joseph Agassi - 1975 - Synthese 30 (1-2):3 - 14.
  35.  16
    The Problem of the Rationality of Magic.Ian C. Jarvie & Joseph Agassi - 1987 - In Joseph Agassi & I. C. Jarvie (eds.), Rationality: The Critical View. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 363--383.
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  36. On the Reliability of Science: The Critical Rationalist Version.Joseph Agassi - 2013 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 43 (1):100-115.
    Error and Inference discusses Deborah Mayo’s theory that connects the reliability of science to scientific evidence. She sees it as an essential supplement to the negative principles of critical rationalism. She and Aris Spanos, her co-editor, declare that the discussions in the book amount to tremendous progress. Yet most contributors to the book misconstrue the Socratic character of critical rationalism because they ignore a principal tenet: criticism in and of itself comprises progress, and empirical refutation comprises learning from experience. Critical (...)
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  37.  73
    Criteria for Plausible Arguments.Joseph Agassi - 1974 - Mind 83 (331):406-416.
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  38.  10
    Magic as Psychotherapy.Joseph Agassi - 2019 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 49 (6):528-533.
    Philosophy of the Social Sciences, Ahead of Print.
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  39.  18
    Popper and the Establishment.Nimrod Bar‐Am & Joseph Agassi - 2005 - Critical Review 17 (1-2):13-23.
    Abstract The central thesis of Karl Popper's philosophy is that intellectual and political progress are best achieved by not deferring to dogmatic authority. His philosophy of science is a plea for the replacement of classic dogmatic methodology with critical debate. His philosophy of politics, similarly, is a plea for replacing Utopian social and political engineering with a more fallibilist, piecemeal variety. Many confuse his anti?dogmatism with relativism, and his anti?authoritarianism with Cold War conservatism or even with libertarian politics. Not so: (...)
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  40.  42
    Let a Thousand Flowers Bloom: Popper's Popular Critics.Joseph Agassi - unknown
    Two suggestions are at the back of the present talk. First, toleration is obligatory, not criticism. So do not try to make people critically-minded: do not force them in any way to try to offer or accept criticism, to learn to participate effectively in the game of critical discussion. If they refuse, then they are within their right. Also, they will easily ad vance excuses for their refusal; admittedly some of these are unreasonable, but not all. Instead of trying to (...)
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  41.  41
    Dissertation Without Tears, P.Joseph Agassi - unknown
    Dissertation without tears By Joseph Agassi Tel-Aviv University 1. Perfectionism is the loss of the sense of proportion. 2. Perfectionism in education is pedantry and obstruction. 3. Pedantry expels traditional writing techniques. 4. There are many ways to write a scientific study. 5. The best and easiest writing formula is the dialectic. 1. Perfectionism is the loss of the sense of proportion.
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  42. Comparability and Incommensurability.Joseph Agassi - 2003 - Social Epistemology 17 (2 & 3):93 – 94.
  43.  47
    Tautology and Testability in Economics.Joseph Agassi - 1971 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 1 (1):49-63.
    Economics is a science - at least positive economics must be. And science is in part applied mathematics, in part empirical observations and tests. Looking at the history of economics, one cannot find much testing done before the twentieth century, and even the collection of data, even in the manner Marx engaged in, was not common in his day. It is true that economic policy is an older field, and in that field much information is deployed for the purpose of (...)
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  44.  79
    The Lakatosian Revolution.Joseph Agassi - 1976 - In R. S. Cohen, P. K. Feyerabend & M. Wartofsky (eds.), Essays in Memory of Imre Lakatos. Reidel. pp. 9--21.
  45.  56
    Turner on Merton.Joseph Agassi - 2009 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 39 (2):284-293.
    Stephen Turner complains about weaknesses of Robert K. Merton's teachings without noticing that these are common. He puts down Merton's ideas despite his innovations, on the ground that they are not successful and not sufficiently revolutionary. The criteria by which he condemns Merton are too vague and too high. Merton's merit is in his having put the sociology of science on the map and drawn attention to the egalitarianism that was prominent in classical science and that is now diminished. Key (...)
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  46.  83
    Induction and Stochastic Independence.Joseph Agassi - 1990 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 41 (1):141-142.
  47. "Popper and After: Four Modern Irrationalists" by David Stove.Joseph Agassi - 1985 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 15 (3):368.
  48.  42
    How Ignoring Repeatability Leads to Magic.Joseph Agassi & Nathaniel Laor - 2000 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 30 (4):528-586.
  49.  25
    Newell's List.Joseph Agassi - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (5):601-602.
    Newell wanted a theory of cognition to abide by some explicit criteria, here called the Newell Test. The test differs from the Turing Test because it is explicit. The Newell Test will include the Turing Test if its characterization of cognition is complete. It is not. Its use here is open-ended: A system that does not pass it well invites improvement.
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  50.  73
    The Problem of Universals.Joseph Agassi & Paul T. Sagal - 1975 - Philosophical Studies 28 (4):289 - 294.
    The pair democreteanism-Platonism (nothing/something is outside space-Time) differs from the pair nominalism-Realism (universals are/are not nameable entities). Nominalism need not be democretean, And democreateanism is nominalist only if conceptualism is rejected. Putnam's critique of nominalism is thus invalid. Quine's theory is democretean-When-Possible: quine is also a minimalist platonist. Conceptualists and realists agree that universals exist but not as physical objects. Nominalists accept universals only as "facons de parler".
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