7 found
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  1.  16
    Healing Without Waging War: Beyond Military Metaphors in Medicine and HIV Cure Research.Jing-Bao Nie, Adam Gilbertson, Malcolm de Roubaix, Ciara Staunton, Anton van Niekerk, Joseph D. Tucker & Stuart Rennie - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (10):3-11.
    Military metaphors are pervasive in biomedicine, including HIV research. Rooted in the mind set that regards pathogens as enemies to be defeated, terms such as “shock and kill” have become widely accepted idioms within HIV cure research. Such language and symbolism must be critically examined as they may be especially problematic when used to express scientific ideas within emerging health-related fields. In this article, philosophical analysis and an interdisciplinary literature review utilizing key texts from sociology, anthropology, history, and Chinese and (...)
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  2.  26
    The Crisis of Patient‐Physician Trust and Bioethics: Lessons and Inspirations From China.Jing‐Bao Nie, Lun Li, Grant Gillett, Joseph D. Tucker & Arthur Kleinman - 2018 - Developing World Bioethics 18 (1):56-64.
    Trust is indispensable not only for interpersonal relationships and social life, but for good quality healthcare. As manifested in the increasing violence and tension in patient-physician relationships, China has been experiencing a widespread and profound crisis of patient–physician trust. And globally, the crisis of trust is an issue that every society, either developing or developed, has to face in one way or another. Yet, in spite of some pioneering works, the subject of patient-physician trust and mistrust – a crucial matter (...)
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  3.  18
    The Ethics of Talking About ‘HIV Cure’.Stuart Rennie, Mark Siedner, Joseph D. Tucker & Keymanthri Moodley - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):18.
    In 2008, researchers reported that Timothy Brown , a man with HIV infection and leukemia, received a stem-cell transplant that removed HIV from his body as far as can be detected. In 2013, an infant born with HIV infection received anti-retroviral treatment shortly after birth, but was then lost to the health care system for the next six months. When tested for HIV upon return, the child had no detectable viral load despite cessation of treatment. These remarkable clinical developments have (...)
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  4.  25
    No More Militaristic and Violent Language in Medicine: Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Healing Without Waging War: Beyond Military Metaphors in Medicine and HIV Cure Research”.Jing-Bao Nie, Stuart Rennie, Adam Gilbertson & Joseph D. Tucker - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (12):9-11.
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  5.  30
    The Vicious Circle of Patient–Physician Mistrust in China: Health Professionals’ Perspectives, Institutional Conflict of Interest, and Building Trust Through Medical Professionalism.Jing‐Bao Nie, Yu Cheng, Xiang Zou, Ni Gong, Joseph D. Tucker, Bonnie Wong & Arthur Kleinman - 2018 - Developing World Bioethics 18 (1):26-36.
    To investigate the phenomenon of patient–physician mistrust in China, a qualitative study involving 107 physicians, nurses and health officials in Guangdong Province, southern China, was conducted through semi-structured interviews and focus groups. In this paper we report the key findings of the empirical study and argue for the essential role of medical professionalism in rebuilding patient-physician trust. Health professionals are trapped in a vicious circle of mistrust. Mistrust leads to increased levels of fear and self-protection by doctors which exacerbate difficulties (...)
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  6.  15
    Rebuilding Patient–Physician Trust in China, Developing a Trust‐Oriented Bioethics.Jing‐Bao Nie, Joseph D. Tucker, Wei Zhu, Yu Cheng, Bonnie Wong & Arthur Kleinman - 2018 - Developing World Bioethics 18 (1):4-6.
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  7.  3
    Forming and Implementing Community Advisory Boards in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Scoping Review.Yang Zhao, Thomas Fitzpatrick, Bin Wan, Suzanne Day, Allison Mathews & Joseph D. Tucker - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):1-11.
    Community advisory boards have expanded beyond high-income countries and play an increasing role in low- and middle-income country research. Much research has examined CABs in HICs, but less is known about CABs in LMICs. The purposes of this scoping review are to examine the creation and implementation of CABs in LMICs, including identifying frequently reported challenges, and to discuss implications for research ethics. We searched five databases for publications describing or evaluating CABs in LMICs. Two researchers independently reviewed articles for (...)
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