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Joseph LaPorte [24]Joseph F. LaPorte [1]Joseph Francis Laporte [1]
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  1.  77
    Rigidity and Kind.Joseph LaPorte - 2000 - Philosophical Studies 97 (3):293-316.
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  2.  9
    Rigid Designation and Theoretical Identities.Joseph LaPorte - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    Rigid designators for concrete objects and for properties -- On the coherence of the distinction -- On whether the distinction assigns to rigidity the right role -- A uniform treatment of property designators as singular terms -- Rigid appliers -- Rigidity - associated arguments in support of theoretical identity statements: on their significance and the cost of its philosophical resources -- The skeptical argument impugning psychophysical identity statements: on its significance and the cost of its philosophical resources -- The skeptical (...)
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  3.  5
    The Logical Structure of Kinds, by Eric Funkhouser.Joseph Laporte - forthcoming - Mind:fzw062.
    The Logical Structure of Kinds, by FunkhouserEric. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014. Pp. 182.
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  4.  59
    Rigid Designators for Properties.Joseph LaPorte - 2004 - Philosophical Studies 130 (2):321-336.
    Here I defend the position that some singular terms for properties are rigid designators, responding to Stephen P. Schwartz’s interesting criticisms of that position. First, I argue that my position does not depend on ontological parsimony with respect to properties – e.g., there is no need to claim that there are only natural properties – to get around the problem of “unusual properties.” Second, I argue that my position does not confuse sameness of meaning across possible worlds with sameness of (...)
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  5.  21
    On Two Reasons for Denying That Bodies Can Outlast Life.Joseph LaPorte - 2009 - Mind 118 (471):795-801.
    Hershenov (2005) gives two interesting, related arguments, which he calls ‘symmetry arguments’, to the effect that a living body or an organism cannot be identical to a corpse, superficial appearances to the contrary. I relate the two arguments briefly and then criticize them for related weaknesses.
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  6.  25
    Is There a Single Objective, Evolutionary Tree of Life?Joseph LaPorte - 2005 - Journal of Philosophy 102 (7):357-374.
    It is often said that there is just one “objective” tree of life: a single accurate branching hierarchy of species reflecting order of descent. For any two species, there is a single correct answer as to whether one is a “daughter” of the other, whether the two are “sister species” by virtue of their descent from a common parental species, whether they belong to a family line that excludes any given third species, and so on. The idea is intrinsically interesting. (...)
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  7. Living Water.Joseph Laporte - 1998 - Mind 107 (426):451-455.
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  8. Theoretical Identity Statements, Their Truth, and Their Discovery.Joseph Laporte - 2010 - In Helen Beebee & Nigel Sabbarton-Leary (eds.), The Semantics and Metaphysics of Natural Kinds. Routledge.
     
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  9.  48
    Essential Membership.Joseph LaPorte - 1997 - Philosophy of Science 64 (1):96-112.
    In this paper I take issue with the doctrine that organisms belong of their very essence to the natural kinds (or biological taxa, if these are not kinds) to which they belong. This view holds that any human essentially belongs to the species Homo sapiens, any feline essentially belongs to the cat family, and so on. I survey the various competing views in biological systematics. These offer different explanations for what it is that makes a member of one species, family, (...)
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  10.  20
    In Defense of Species.Joseph LaPorte - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 38 (1):255-269.
    In this paper, I address the charge that the category species should be abandoned in biological work. The widespread appeal to species in scientific discourse provides a presumption in favor of the category’s usefulness, but a defeasible presumption. Widely acknowledged troubles attend species: these troubles might render the concept unusable by showing that ‘species’ is equivocal or meaningless or in some similar way fatally flawed. Further, there might be better alternatives to species. I argue that the presumption in favor of (...)
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  11.  33
    Does a Type Specimen Necessarily or Contingently Belong to its Species?Joseph LaPorte - 2003 - Biology and Philosophy 18 (4):583-588.
    In a recent article, Alex Levine raises a paradox. It appears that, given some relatively uncontroversial premises about how a species term comes to refer to its species, a type specimen belongs necessarily and contingently to its species. According to Levine, this problem arises if species are individuals rather than natural kinds. I argue that the problem can be generalized: the problem also arises if species are kinds and type specimens are paradigmatic members used to baptize names for species. Indeed, (...)
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  12.  36
    Must Signals Handicap?Joseph LaPorte - 2002 - The Monist 85 (1):86-104.
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  13.  84
    Natural Kinds and Conceptual Change.Joseph LaPorte - 2003 - Cambridge University Press.
    According to the received tradition, the language used to to refer to natural kinds in scientific discourse remains stable even as theories about these kinds are refined. In this illuminating book, Joseph LaPorte argues that scientists do not discover that sentences about natural kinds, like 'Whales are mammals, not fish', are true rather than false. Instead, scientists find that these sentences were vague in the language of earlier speakers and they refine the meanings of the relevant natural-kind terms to make (...)
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  14.  23
    Species as Relations: Examining a New Proposal. [REVIEW]Joseph LaPorte - 2005 - Biology and Philosophy 21 (3):381-393.
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  15. Samir Okasha, Philosophy of Science: A Very Short Introduction. [REVIEW]Joseph Laporte - 2003 - Philosophy in Review 23:268-269.
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  16.  28
    Reviews. [REVIEW]Paul Rule, Patrick Hutchings, Reg Naulty, Joseph LaPorte, Purushottama Bilimoria, Renee Abbott, Peter Kakol, Rob Harle & V. L. Krishnamoorthy - 1999 - Sophia 38 (1):122-166.
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  17.  4
    In Defense of Species.Joseph LaPorte - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 38 (1):255-269.
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  18.  24
    Rigid Designators.Joseph LaPorte - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  19. Samir Okasha, Philosophy of Science: A Very Short Introduction Reviewed By.Joseph LaPorte - 2003 - Philosophy in Review 23 (4):268-269.
  20.  3
    On Systematists' Single Objective Tree of Ancestors and Descendants.Joseph F. LaPorte - 2009 - Biological Theory 4 (3):260.
    It is often said that there is just one “objective” tree of life: a single accurate branching hierarchy of species reflecting order of descent. For any two species there is a single correct answer as to whether one is a “daughter” of the other, whether the two are “sister species” by virtue of their descent from a common parental species, whether they belong to a family line that excludes any given third species, and so on. This position is not right. (...)
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  21.  8
    Selection for Handicaps.Joseph LaPorte - 2001 - Biology and Philosophy 16 (2):239-249.
  22.  2
    Review. [REVIEW]Joseph LaPorte - 2003 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 54 (4):627-630.
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  23. Genes, Categories, and Species: The Evolutionary and Cognitive Causes of the Species Problem. [REVIEW]Joseph Laporte - 2003 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 54 (4):627-630.
     
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  24. In Defense of Species.Joseph Laporte - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 38 (1):255-269.
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  25. Natural Kinds and Conceptual Change.Joseph Laporte - 2005 - Philosophical Quarterly 55 (221):672-674.
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