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Joseph E. LeDoux [19]Joseph LeDoux [11]
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Joseph LeDoux
New York University
Joseph LeDoux
New York University
  1. The mnemonic basis of subjective experience.Hakwan Lau, Matthias Michel, Joseph LeDoux & Stephen Fleming - 2022 - Nature Reviews Psychology.
    Conscious experiences involve subjective qualities, such as colours, sounds, smells and emotions. In this Perspective, we argue that these subjective qualities can be understood in terms of their similarity to other experiences. This account highlights the role of memory in conscious experience, even for simple percepts. How an experience feels depends on implicit memory of the relationships between different perceptual representations within the brain. With more complex experiences such as emotions, explicit memories are also recruited. We draw inspiration from work (...)
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  2. Understanding the Higher-Order Approach to Consciousness.Richard Brown, Hakwan Lau & Joseph E. LeDoux - 2019 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 23 (9):754-768.
    Critics have often misunderstood the higher-order theory (HOT) of consciousness. Here we clarify its position on several issues, and distinguish it from other views such as the global The higher-order theory (HOT) of consciousness has often been misunderstood by critics. Here we clarify its position on several issues, and distinguish it from other views such as the global workspace theory (GWT) and early sensory models (e.g. first-order local recurrency theories). For example, HOT has been criticized for over-intellectualizing consciousness. We show (...)
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  3. A Higher-Order Theory of Emotional Consciousness.Joseph LeDoux & Richard Brown - 2017 - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 114 (10):E2016-E2025.
    Emotional states of consciousness, or what are typically called emotional feelings, are traditionally viewed as being innately programed in subcortical areas of the brain, and are often treated as different from cognitive states of consciousness, such as those related to the perception of external stimuli. We argue that conscious experiences, regardless of their content, arise from one system in the brain. On this view, what differs in emotional and non-emotional states is the kind of inputs that are processed by a (...)
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  4.  49
    Cognitive-Emotional Interactions in the Brain.Joseph E. Ledoux - 1989 - Cognition and Emotion 3 (4):267-289.
  5.  70
    The slippery slope of fear.Joseph E. LeDoux - 2013 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 17 (4):155-156.
    'Fear' is used scientifically in two ways, which causes confusion: it refers to conscious feelings and to behavioral and physiological responses. Restricting the use of 'fear' to denote feelings and using 'threat-induced defensive reactions' for the responses would help avoid misunderstandings about the brain mechanisms involved.
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  6. The extra ingredient.Richard Brown, Joseph LeDoux & David Rosenthal - 2021 - Biology and Philosophy 36 (2):1-4.
    Birch et. al. see their model as incompatible with higher-order-thought (HOT) theories of consciousness, on which a state is conscious if one is in some suitable way aware of that state. They see higher-order (HO) awareness as an “extra ingredient”. But since Birch et al go on to say that “[t]his is not the place for a detailed discussion of HOT theories,” they don’t address why they take HO awareness to be an extra ingredient or why HOT theorists are convinced (...)
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  7. A little history goes a long way toward understanding why we study consciousness the way we do today.Joseph LeDoux, Matthias Michel & Hakwan Lau - 2020 - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 1.
    Consciousness is currently a thriving area of research in psychology and neuroscience. While this is often attributed to events that took place in the early 1990s, consciousness studies today are a continuation of research that started in the late 19th century and that continued throughout the 20th century. From the beginning, the effort built on studies of animals to reveal basic principles of brain organization and function, and of human patients to gain clues about consciousness itself. Particularly important and our (...)
     
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  8.  76
    Know Thyself: Well-Being and Subjective Experience.Joseph LeDoux, Richard Brown, Daniel S. Pine & Stefan G. Hofmann - 2018 - Cerebrum (2018).
  9.  14
    Emotional coloration of consciousness: how feelings come about.Joseph LeDoux - 2008 - In Lawrence Weiskrantz & Martin Davies (eds.), Frontiers of Consciousness. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 69-130.
  10.  39
    A Neuroscientist’s Perspective on Debates about the Nature of Emotion.Joseph LeDoux - 2012 - Emotion Review 4 (4):375-379.
    The target articles by Dixon (2012), Scarantino (2012), and Mulligan and Scherer (2012) explore the nature of emotion from philosophical and psychological perspectives. I discuss how neuroscience can also contribute to debates about the nature of emotion. I focus on the aspects of emotion that usually fall within the topic of basic emotions, but conclude that we may need to revise how we conceive and study these kinds of emotional states in relation to the brain.
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  11.  54
    Cognitive-emotional interactions: Listen to the brain.Joseph Ledoux - 2000 - In Richard D. R. Lane, L. Nadel, G. L. Ahern, J. Allen & Alfred W. Kaszniak (eds.), Cognitive Neuroscience of Emotion. Oxford University Press. pp. 129--155.
  12.  9
    Comment: What’s Basic About the Brain Mechanisms of Emotion?Joseph E. LeDoux - 2014 - Emotion Review 6 (4):318-320.
    While it is common to think that neuroscientists are proponents of basic emotions theory, this is not necessarily the case. My ideas, for example are more aligned with cognitive than basic emotions theories.
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  13. Higher-Order Memory Schema and Conscious Experience.Richard Brown & Joseph LeDoux - 2020 - Cognitive Neuropsychology 37 (3-4):213-215.
    In the interesting and thought-provoking article Grazziano and colleagues argue for their Attention Schema Theory (AST) of consciousness. They present AST as a unification of Global Workspace Theory (GWT), Illusionism, and the Higher-Order Thought (HOT) theory. We argue it is a mistake to equate 'subjective experience,' ad related terms, with dualism. They simply denote experience. Also, as presented, AST does not accurately capture the essence of HOT for two reasons. HOT is presented as a version of strong illusionism, which it (...)
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  14.  37
    The brain and the split brain: A duel with duality as a model of mind.Joseph E. LeDoux & Michael S. Gazzaniga - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (1):109-110.
  15.  18
    Cognition versus emotion, again-this time in the brain: a response to Parrott and Schulkin.Joseph E. Ledoux - 1993 - Cognition and Emotion 7 (1):61-64.
  16.  13
    The Contribution of the Amygdala to Aversive and Appetitive Pavlovian Processes.Justin M. Moscarello & Joseph E. LeDoux - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (3):248-253.
    Pavlovian cues predict the occurrence of motivationally salient outcomes, thus serving as an important trigger of approach and avoidance behavior. The amygdala is a key substrate of Pavlovian conditioning, and the nature of its contribution varies by the motivational valence of unconditioned stimuli. The literature on aversive Pavlovian learning supports a serial-processing model of amygdalar function, while appetitive studies suggest that Pavlovian associations are processed through parallel circuits in the amygdala. It is proposed that serial and parallel forms of information (...)
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  17.  5
    Against Happiness.Owen Flanagan, Joseph E. LeDoux, Bobby Bingle, Daniel M. Haybron, Batja Mesquita, Michele Moody-Adams, Songyao Ren, Anna Sun & Yolonda Y. Wilson - forthcoming - Columbia University Press.
    The “happiness agenda” is a worldwide movement that claims that happiness is the highest good, happiness can be measured, and public policy should promote happiness. Against Happiness is a thorough and powerful critique of this program, revealing the flaws of its concept of happiness and advocating a renewed focus on equality and justice. -/- Written by an interdisciplinary team of authors, this book provides both theoretical and empirical analysis of the limitations of the happiness agenda. The authors emphasize that this (...)
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  18. Emotions: How I've Looked for Them in the Brain.Joseph E. LeDoux - 2002 - In Robert J. Russell (ed.), Neuroscience and the Person: Scientific Perspectives on Divine Action. Center for Ttheology and the Natural Sciences. pp. 41--56.
     
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  19. The deep history of ourselves: the four-billion-year story of how we got conscious brains.Joseph E. LeDoux - 2019 - New York City: Viking Press.
     
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  20. The Self - Ancient and Modern.Timothy J. Reiss, Joseph E. Ledoux, Matthew S. Santirocco, Phillip Mitsis & Eva Cantarella - 2000 - New York University Press.
     
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  21.  10
    Brightness discrimination loss after lesions of the corpus striatum in the white rat.Robert Thompson, Holly Chetta & Joseph E. Ledoux - 1974 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 3 (4):293-295.
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  22. Fear and the brain.Jacek Debiec & Joseph LeDoux - 2004 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 71 (4):807-818.
     
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  23.  9
    Common brain regions essential for the expression of learned and instinctive visual habits in the albino rat.Robert Thompson & Joseph E. Ledoux - 1974 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 4 (2):78-80.
  24.  25
    Emotional circuits and computational neuroscience.Jean-Marc Fellous, Jorge L. Armony & Joseph E. LeDoux - 2002 - In M. Arbib (ed.), The Handbook of Brain Theory and Neural Networks. MIT Press. pp. 2.
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  25.  11
    A stereotaxic map of brainstem areas critical for locomotor responses in a novel environment.Robert Thompson & Joseph E. Ledoux - 1975 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 6 (3):327-328.
  26. Emotions-A View through the Brain.Joseph E. LeDoux - 2002 - In Robert J. Russell (ed.), Neuroscience and the Person: Scientific Perspectives on Divine Action. Center for Ttheology and the Natural Sciences. pp. 101--118.
     
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  27.  7
    Stereotaxic mapping of brainstem areas critical for the expression of the rodent’s preference for the dark.Robert Thompson & Joseph E. Ledoux - 1976 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 8 (6):472-474.
  28.  3
    The Self: from Soul to Brain.Joseph E. LeDoux, Jacek Debiec & Henry Moss (eds.) - 2003 - New York Academy of Sciences.
    This work constitutes the proceedings of a New York Academy of Sciences conference held in September 2002. It seeks to take stock of understanding of the self and its relation to the brain, and consider future directions for scientific research in a multidisciplinary context.
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  29. Emotional plasticity.Glenn E. Schafe & Joseph E. Ledoux - 2002 - In J. Wixted & H. Pashler (eds.), Stevens' Handbook of Experimental Psychology. Wiley.
     
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  30.  2
    The Deep History of Ourselves: The Four-Billion-Year Story of How We Got Conscious Brains.Joseph LeDoux - forthcoming - Philosophical Psychology.
    The essence of who we are depends on our brains. They enable us to think, to feel joy and sorrow, communicate through speech, reflect on the moments of our lives, and to anticipate, plan for, and worry about our imagined futures. Although some of our abilities are comparatively new, key features of our behavior have deep roots that can be traced to the beginning of life. By following the story of behavior, step-by-step, over its roughly four-billion-year trajectory, we come to (...)
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