16 found
Order:
  1.  26
    Individual, Family, and Societal Dimensions of Genetic Discrimination: A Case Study Analysis. [REVIEW]Lisa N. Geller, Joseph S. Alper, Paul R. Billings, Carol I. Barash, Jonathan Beckwith & Marvin R. Natowicz - 1996 - Science and Engineering Ethics 2 (1):71-88.
    Background. As the development and use of genetic tests have increased, so have concerns regarding the uses of genetic information. Genetic discrimination, the differential treatment of individuals based on real or perceived differences in their genomes, is a recently described form of discrimination. The range and significance of experiences associated with this form of discrimination are not yet well known and are investigated in this study. Methods. Individuals at-risk to develop a genetic condition and parents of children with specific genetic (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  2.  31
    Distinguishing Genetic From Nongenetic Medical Tests: Some Implications for Antidiscrimination Legislation.Joseph S. Alper & Jon Beckwith - 1998 - Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (2):141-150.
    Genetic discrimination is becoming an increasingly important problem in the United States. Information acquired from genetic tests has been used by insurance companies to reject applications for insurance policies and to refuse payment for the treatment of illnesses. Numerous states and the United States Congress have passed or are considering passage of laws that would forbid such use of genetic information by health insurance companies. Here we argue that much of this legislation is severely flawed because of the difficulty in (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  3.  99
    Newtonian Supertasks: A Critical Analysis.Joseph S. Alper & Mark Bridger - 1998 - Synthese 114 (2):355-369.
    In two recent papers Perez Laraudogoitia has described a variety of supertasks involving elastic collisions in Newtonian systems containing a denumerably infinite set of particles. He maintains that these various supertasks give examples of systems in which energy is not conserved, particles at rest begin to move spontaneously, particles disappear from a system, and particles are created ex nihilo. An analysis of these supertasks suggests that they involve systems that do not satisfy the mathematical conditions required of Newtonian systems at (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  4. The Double-Edged Helix Social Implications of Genetics in a Diverse Society.Joseph S. Alper - 2002
  5.  12
    Reconsidering Genetic Antidiscrimination Legislation.Jon Beckwith & Joseph S. Alper - 1998 - Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 26 (3):205-210.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  6.  2
    Sex Differences in Brain Asymmetry: A Critical Analysis.Joseph S. Alper - 1985 - Feminist Studies 11 (1):7.
  7.  55
    On the Philosophical Analysis of Genetic Essentialism.Joseph S. Alper & Jon Beckwith - 2000 - Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (3):311-314.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  1
    Reconsidering Genetic Antidiscrimination Legislation.Jon Beckwith & Joseph S. Alper - 1998 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 26 (3):205-210.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  9.  41
    Two Ways of Looking at a Newtonian Supertask.Jon Pérez Laaraudogoitia, Mark Bridger & Joseph S. Alper - 2002 - Synthese 131 (2):173 - 189.
    A supertask is a process in which an infinite number of individuated actions are performed in a finite time. A Newtonian supertask is one that obeys Newton''s laws of motion. Such supertasks can violate energy and momentum conservation and can exhibit indeterministic behavior. Perez Laraudogoitia, who proposed several Newtonian supertasks, uses a local, i.e., particle-by-particle, analysis to obtain these and other paradoxical properties of Newtonian supertasks. Alper and Bridger use a global analysis, embedding the system of particles in a Banach (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  31
    On the Dynamics of Perez Lauraudogoitia's Supertask.Mark Bridger & Joseph S. Alper - 1999 - Synthese 119 (3):325-337.
    The supertasks described by Perez Laraudogoitia, involving the dynamics of a system containing an infinite number of particles in a bounded region of space, are characterized by the nonconservation of energy and by the spontaneous motion of particles. We argue that these features arise from the inadequacy of the local, particle-by-particle description used to analyze the supertasks. A global analysis, involving embeddings in Hilbert spaces, clarifies these supertasks and avoids what we regard as their nonphysical features.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  15
    Does the ADA Provide Protection Against Discrimination on the Basis of Genotype?Joseph S. Alper - 1995 - Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 23 (2):167-172.
  12. Facts, Values, and Biology.Joseph S. Alper - 1981 - Philosophical Forum 13 (2):85.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  13.  6
    Mathematical Models for Gene–Culture Coevolution.Joseph S. Alper & Robert V. Lange - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):739.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. A Methodological Analysis of Sociobiology.Joseph S. Alper - 1981 - Philosophical Forum 13 (2):67.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Biological Determinism.Joseph S. Alper - 1977 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 31:164.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Does the ADA Provide Protection Against Discrimination on the Basis of Genotype?Joseph S. Alper - 1995 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 23 (2):167-172.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography