Order:
See also
Joseph Urbas
Université Bordeaux Montaigne
  1. True Romance: Emerson's Realism.Joseph Urbas - 2009 - Southwest Philosophy Review 25 (2):113-147.
    Two things have been missing from discussions of Emerson and skepticism. The first—and the most glaring omission, given his precise, unambiguous definition of skepticism as “unbelief in cause and effect” (“Worship”)—is Emerson’s causationism. The second is his view of skepticism as organically related to a wide array of other forms of anti-realism or “romance.” Only the first can explain the second and thereby give us a better sense of how Emerson’s specific response to skepticism as a philosophical problem fits into (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  4
    Le realisme critique et au-delà. La dialectique de Roy Bhaskar.Alex Callinicos & Joseph Urbas - 1994 - Actuel Marx 2:171.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  15
    Emerson's Metaphysics: A Song of Laws and Causes.Joseph Urbas - 2016 - Lexington Books.
    This book gives the first complete, fully historicized account of Emerson's metaphysics of cause and effect and its foundational position in his philosophy as a whole. Joseph Urbas proposes an intellectual biography of Emerson the metaphysician but also the life-story of a concept synonymous, in the Transcendentalist period, with life itself—the story of the principle at the origin of all being and change.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Cavell’s “Moral Perfectionism” or Emerson’s “Moral Sentiment”?Joseph Urbas - 2010 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 2 (2):41-53.
    What is properly Emersonian about moral perfectionism? Perhaps the best answer is: not much. Stanley Cavell's signature concept, which claims close kinship to Emerson's ethical philosophy, seems upon careful examination to be rather far removed from it. Once we get past the broad, unproblematic appeals to Emerson's “unattained but attainable self,” and consider the specific content and implications of perfectionism, the differences between the two thinkers become too substantive – and too fraught with serious misunderstandings – to be ignored. It (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark