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  1.  9
    Foucault and Nietzsche: A Critical Encounter.Joseph Westfall & Alan Rosenberg (eds.) - 2018 - New York: Bloomsbury.
    Foucault's intellectual indebtedness to Nietzsche is apparent in his writing, yet the precise nature, extent, and nuances of that debt are seldom explored. Foucault himself seems sometimes to claim that his approach is essentially Nietzschean, and sometimes to insist that he amounts to a radical break with Nietzsche. This volume is the first of its kind, presenting the relationship between these two thinkers on elements of contemporary culture that they shared interests in, including the nature of life in the modern (...)
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  2. Edward F. Mooney.Joseph Westfall & Niels Jørgen - 2009 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (7):869-882.
     
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  3.  10
    Authorship and Authority in Kierkegaard's Writings.Joseph Westfall (ed.) - 2018 - Bloomsbury Academic.
    Authorship is a complicated subject in Kierkegaard's work, which he surely recognized, given his late attempts to explain himself in On My Work as an Author. From the use of multiple pseudonyms and antonyms, to contributions across a spectrum of media and genres, issues of authorship abound. Why did Kierkegaard write in the ways he did? Before we assess Kierkegaard's famous thoughts on faith or love, or the relationship between 'the aesthetic,' 'the ethical,' and 'the religious,' we must approach how (...)
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  4. Asa nisi masa: Kierkegaardian repetition in Fellini's 8 1/2.Joseph Westfall - 2019 - In David P. Nichols (ed.), Transcendence and Film: Cinematic Encounters with the Real. Lexington Books.
     
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  5.  8
    “A Very Poetic Person in a Poem”.Joseph Westfall - 2006 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 2006 (1):38-53.
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  6.  14
    Cybersmut1.Joseph Westfall - 1999 - Business and Society Review 102-102 (1):89-94.
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  7.  1
    Cybersmut 1.Joseph Westfall - 1999 - Business and Society Review 102-103 (1):89-94.
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  8.  37
    Teaching the Ubermensch: Denial and Overcoming in Nietzsche’s Zarathustra I.Joseph Westfall - 2005 - New Nietzsche Studies 6 (3-4):35-51.
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  9.  32
    Denial and Overcoming in Nietzsche’s Zarathustra I.Joseph Westfall - 2005 - New Nietzsche Studies 6 (3-4):35-51.
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  10.  24
    Foucault, Nietzsche, and the promise–threat of philology.Joseph Westfall - 2018 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 44 (1):24-40.
    In this paper, I examine Foucault’s reading of Nietzsche—and Nietzsche’s influence on Foucault—in light of Foucault’s frequent treatment of Nietzsche as a certain kind of philologist. Running contrary to most contemporary readings of Nietzsche, which depict him as abandoning philology for philosophy relatively early on, I argue that Foucault understands Nietzsche’s distinctive philosophical style as indicative of a persistently philological approach to traditionally philosophical questions—and that this is a productive and valuable reading of Nietzsche, as well as a model for (...)
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  11.  54
    Ironic midwives: Socratic maieutics in Nietzsche and Kierkegaard.Joseph Westfall - 2009 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (6):627-648.
    In this article, I argue that despite their philosophical differences, Nietzsche and Kierkegaard share a philosophical method or style rooted in the irony of Socrates. Such irony, when used to distance the author of a written work from its reader, effects the same sort of relationship between the author and the truth as was characteristic of Socrates. Thus, by way of writing in a certain, artful way, both Kierkegaard and Nietzsche are able to pull away from their readers, depriving themselves (...)
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  12.  38
    Kierkegaard and Intentionally Fictional Authors.Joseph Westfall - 2012 - Philosophy Today 56 (3):343-354.
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  13.  6
    Kierkegaard and the Ingenious Creature: Authorial Unity and Co-Authorship in On My Work as an Author.Joseph Westfall - 2010 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 2010 (1):267-288.
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  14.  7
    Listening in/to Woody Allen's Crimes and Misdemeanors.Joseph Westfall - 2000 - Film and Philosophy 4:126-143.
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  15.  66
    Nietzsche and the Approach of Tragedy.Joseph Westfall - 2003 - International Philosophical Quarterly 43 (3):333-350.
    In a small portion of The Origin of German Tragic Drama, Walter Benjamin engages in a critique of Nietzsche’s understanding of tragedy in The Birth of Tragedy. He argues that Nietzsche’s account divests individuals of significance in the tragic worldview. The corrective to Nietzsche’s view, according to Benjamin, is a reflective, historical approach to the Greek social and literary phenomenon of tragic poetry. I argue that Benjamin’s approach to tragedy and to The Birth of Tragedy is inherently flawed. The paper (...)
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  16. ¿ Qué es la cibermujer? El Segundo Sexo en el ciberespacio.Joseph Westfall - 2001 - Studium 41 (2):311-326.
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  17.  30
    Saving Abraham.Joseph Westfall - 2004 - Philosophy Today 48 (3):276-287.
  18.  11
    The continental philosophy of film reader.Joseph Westfall (ed.) - 2018 - New York: Bloomsbury Academic.
    The first collection of its kind, The Continental Philosophy of Film Reader is the essential anthology of writings by continental philosophers on cinema, representing the last century of film-making and thinking about film, as well as all of the major schools of Continental thought: phenomenology and existentialism, Marxism and critical theory, semiotics and hermeneutics, psychoanalysis, and postmodernism. Included here are not only the classic texts in continental philosophy of film, from Benjamin's “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical (...)
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  19.  29
    Who is the author of The Point of View? Issues of authorship in the posthumous Kierkegaard.Joseph Westfall - 2012 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 38 (6):569-589.
    Kierkegaard scholars have made much of Kierkegaard’s posthumously published The Point of View for My Work as an Author, and the work does seem to provide a key to interpreting Kierkegaard’s infamous authorial difficulties – not the least of which is the meaning of pseudonymity in his work. Considerations of the book’s authorship itself are, however, exceptionally rare. In this article, I open an inquiry into issues of authorship that arise within the work, both in terms of what The Point (...)
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  20.  29
    Zarathustra's Germanity: Luther, Goethe, Nietzsche.Joseph Westfall - 2004 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 27 (1):42-63.
  21.  46
    What is cyberwoman?: The second sex in cyberspace. [REVIEW]Joseph Westfall - 2000 - Ethics and Information Technology 2 (3):159-166.
    In this paper I wish to show that, although traditional notions of genderand sex break down in cyberspace, a revised Beauvoirian understanding ofsexual secondariness is applicable and useful in coming to terms with thepossible ethical and philosophical ramifications of this relatively newcommunication medium. To this end, I argue that persons who enter intocommunication in online chat rooms necessarily deny the bodily aspectsof their own identity. In so doing, these persons make themselvesinessential, or secondary, in Beauvior's sense. For Beauvoir, this isa (...)
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