27 found
Order:
Disambiguations
Joshua D. Greene [21]Joshua Greene [6]Joshua David Greene [1]
  1. Moral Tribes: Emotion, Reason and the Gap Between Us and Them.Joshua D. Greene - 2013 - Penguin Press.
    Our brains were designed for tribal life, for getting along with a select group of others and for fighting off everyone else. But modern times have forced the world’s tribes into a shared space, resulting in epic clashes of values along with unprecedented opportunities. As the world shrinks, the moral lines that divide us become more salient and more puzzling. We fight over everything from tax codes to gay marriage to global warming, and we wonder where, if at all, we (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   109 citations  
  2. How Does Moral Judgment Work?Joshua Greene & Jonathan Haidt - 2002 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (12):517-523.
  3. The Secret Joke of Kant’s Soul.Joshua Greene - 2007 - In W. Sinnott-Armstrong (ed.), Moral Psychology, Vol. 3. MIT Press.
    In this essay, I draw on Haidt’s and Baron’s respective insights in the service of a bit of philosophical psychoanalysis. I will argue that deontological judgments tend to be driven by emotional responses, and that deontological philosophy, rather than being grounded in moral reasoning, is to a large extent3 an exercise in moral rationalization. This is in contrast to consequentialism, which, I will argue, arises from rather different psychological processes, ones that are more “cognitive,” and more likely to involve genuine (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   135 citations  
  4. Beyond Point-and-Shoot Morality: Why Cognitive (Neuro)Science Matters for Ethics.Joshua D. Greene - 2014 - Ethics 124 (4):695-726.
    In this article I explain why cognitive science (including some neuroscience) matters for normative ethics. First, I describe the dual-process theory of moral judgment and briefly summarize the evidence supporting it. Next I describe related experimental research examining influences on intuitive moral judgment. I then describe two ways in which research along these lines can have implications for ethics. I argue that a deeper understanding of moral psychology favors certain forms of consequentialism over other classes of normative moral theory. I (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   77 citations  
  5. Pushing Moral Buttons: The Interaction Between Personal Force and Intention in Moral Judgment.Joshua D. Greene, Fiery A. Cushman, Lisa E. Stewart, Kelly Lowenberg, Leigh E. Nystrom & Jonathan D. Cohen - 2009 - Cognition 111 (3):364-371.
  6.  89
    Cognitive Load Selectively Interferes with Utilitarian Moral Judgment.Joshua D. Greene, Sylvia A. Morelli, Kelly Lowenberg, Leigh E. Nystrom & Jonathan D. Cohen - 2008 - Cognition 107 (3):1144-1154.
  7. Reflection and Reasoning in Moral Judgment.Joshua D. Greene - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (1):163-177.
    While there is much evidence for the influence of automatic emotional responses on moral judgment, the roles of reflection and reasoning remain uncertain. In Experiment 1, we induced subjects to be more reflective by completing the Cognitive Reflection Test prior to responding to moral dilemmas. This manipulation increased utilitarian responding, as individuals who reflected more on the CRT made more utilitarian judgments. A follow-up study suggested that trait reflectiveness is also associated with increased utilitarian judgment. In Experiment 2, subjects considered (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   64 citations  
  8. Comparing the Effect of Rational and Emotional Appeals on Donation Behavior.Matthew Lindauer, Marcus Mayorga, Joshua D. Greene, Paul Slovic, Daniel Västfjäll & Peter Singer - 2020 - Judgment and Decision Making 15 (3):413-420.
    We present evidence from a pre-registered experiment indicating that a philosophical argument––a type of rational appeal––can persuade people to make charitable donations. The rational appeal we used follows Singer’s well-known “shallow pond” argument (1972), while incorporating an evolutionary debunking argument (Paxton, Ungar, & Greene 2012) against favoring nearby victims over distant ones. The effectiveness of this rational appeal did not differ significantly from that of a well-tested emotional appeal involving an image of a single child in need (Small, Loewenstein, and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9. Why Are VMPFC Patients More Utilitarian? A Dual-Process Theory of Moral Judgment Explains.Joshua D. Greene - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (8):322-323.
  10.  27
    Divine Intuition: Cognitive Style Influences Belief in God.Amitai Shenhav, David G. Rand & Joshua D. Greene - 2012 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 141 (3):423.
  11. Multi-System Moral Psychology.Fiery Cushman, Liane Young & Joshua D. Greene - 2010 - In John Michael Doris (ed.), The Moral Psychology Handbook. Oxford University Press.
  12.  35
    The Rat-a-Gorical Imperative: Moral Intuition and the Limits of Affective Learning.Joshua D. Greene - 2017 - Cognition 167:66-77.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  13. Moral Reasoning: Hints and Allegations.Joseph M. Paxton & Joshua D. Greene - 2010 - Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (3):511-527.
    Recent research in moral psychology highlights the role of emotion and intuition in moral judgment. In the wake of these findings, the role and significance of moral reasoning remain uncertain. In this article, we distinguish among different kinds of moral reasoning and review evidence suggesting that at least some kinds of moral reasoning play significant roles in moral judgment, including roles in abandoning moral intuitions in the absence of justifying reasons, applying both deontological and utilitarian moral principles, and counteracting automatic (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  14.  19
    Sacrificial Utilitarian Judgments Do Reflect Concern for the Greater Good: Clarification Via Process Dissociation and the Judgments of Philosophers.Paul Conway, Jacob Goldstein-Greenwood, David Polacek & Joshua D. Greene - 2018 - Cognition 179:241-265.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  15. Finding Faults: How Moral Dilemmas Illuminate Cognitive Structure.Joshua D. Greene - unknown
    In philosophy, a debate can live forever. Nowhere is this more evident than in ethics, a field that is fueled by apparently intractable dilemmas. To promote the wellbeing of many, may we sacrifice the rights of a few? If our actions are predetermined, can we be held responsible for them? Should people be judged on their intentions alone, or also by the consequences of their behavior? Is failing to prevent someone’s death as blameworthy as actively causing it? For generations, questions (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  16.  53
    The Rise of Moral Cognition.Joshua D. Greene - 2015 - Cognition 135:39-42.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  17.  27
    Beyond Point-and-Shoot Morality: Why Cognitive Science Matters for Ethics.Joshua D. Greene - 2015 - Law and Ethics of Human Rights 9 (2):141-172.
    Journal Name: The Law & Ethics of Human Rights Issue: Ahead of print.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  18.  8
    Beyond Point-and-Shoot Morality: Why Cognitive Science Matters for Ethics.Joshua D. Greene - 2015 - The Law and Ethics of Human Rights 9 (2):141-172.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  19. Emotion and Morality: A Tasting Menu.Joshua D. Greene - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (3):227-229.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  20.  23
    19 Cognitive Neuroscience and the Structure of the Moral Mind.Joshua Greene - 2005 - In Peter Carruthers, Stephen Laurence & Stephen P. Stich (eds.), The Innate Mind: Structure and Contents. Oxford University Press. pp. 1--338.
    This chapter discusses neurocognitive work relevant to moral psychology and the proposition that innate factors make important contributions to moral judgment. It reviews various sources of evidence for an innate moral faculty, before presenting brain-imaging data in support of the same conclusion. It is argued that our moral thought is the product of an interaction between some ‘gut-reaction’ moral emotions and our capacity for abstract reflection.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  21.  34
    Morality and Emotion: A Tasting Menu.Joshua D. Greene - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (3):227-229.
  22. Positive Neuroscience.Joshua D. Greene, India Morrison & Martin E. P. Seligman (eds.) - 2016 - Oxford University Press USA.
    How do we thrive in our behaviors and experiences? Positive neuroscience research illuminates the brain mechanisms that enable human flourishing. Supported by the John Templeton Foundation's Positive Neuroscience Project, which Martin E. P. Seligman established in 2008, Positive Neuroscience provides an intersection between neuroscience and positive psychology.In this edited volume, leading researchers describe the neuroscience of social bonding, altruism, and the capacities for resilience and creativity. Part I describes the mechanisms that enable humans to connect with one another. Part II (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23.  49
    Conflict Monitoring in Cognition-Emotion Competition.Samuel M. McClure, Matthew M. Botvinick, Nick Yeung, Joshua D. Greene & Jonathan D. Cohen - 2007 - In James J. Gross (ed.), Handbook of Emotion Regulation. Guilford Press.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  24.  22
    Determinants of Insensitivity to Quantity in Valuation of Public Goods: Contribution, Warm Glow, Budget Constraints, Availability, and Prominence.Jonathan Baron & Joshua Greene - 1996 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 2 (2):107.
  25. Emocje i procesy poznawcze zaangażowane w wydawanie sądów moralnych. Dane z neuroobrazowania.Joshua Greene & Wioletta Dziarnowska - 2012 - Studia Z Kognitywistyki I Filozofii Umysłu 6.
    Tradycyjne teorie psychologii moralności podkreślają rolę rozumowania i „wyższych procesów poznawczych”, podczas gdy ostatnie prace z tego zakresu uwypuklają udział emocji. W niniejszym artykule rozpatruję dane pochodzące z neuroobrazowania wspierające teorię sądzenia moralnego, zgodnie z którą zarówno procesy „poznawcze”, jak i emocjonalne pełnią istotne a czasami wzajemnie konkurencyjne role. Dane te wskazują, że rejony mózgu związane z kontrolą poznawczą (przednia część zakrętu obręczy i grzbietowo boczna kora przedczołowa) są zaangażowane w rozwiązywanie trudnych moralnych dylematów, w których wartości utylitarne wymagają naruszenia (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. How Moral Dilemmas Illuminate Cognitive Structure.Joshua D. Greene - unknown
    In philosophy, a debate can live forever. Nowhere is this more evident than in ethics, a field that is fueled by apparently intractable dilemmas. To promote the wellbeing of many, may we sacrifice the rights of a few? If our actions are predetermined, can we be held responsible for them? Should people be judged on their intentions alone, or also by the consequences of their behavior? Is failing to prevent someone’s death as blameworthy as actively causing it? For generations, questions (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Trends in Cognitive Sciences–How (and Where) Does Moral Judgment Work?Joshua Greene & Jonathan Haidt - 2010 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences. Web 13:02011-9.