Results for 'Josiah Tucker'

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  1.  37
    Liberty, Poverty and Charity in the Political Economy of Josiah Tucker and Joseph Butler.Peter Xavier Price - 2019 - Modern Intellectual History 16 (3):741-770.
    Josiah Tucker, who was the Anglican dean of Gloucester from 1758 until his death in 1799, is best known today as a controversialist, a political economist and a lesser contemporary of Adam Smith. Little attention has been paid, however, to the important relationship between his religious writings and his wider economic thought. This article addresses this lack of attention in two ways: first by demonstrating the link between Tucker's conception of civil and religious liberty and his “science” (...)
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  2. Josiah Tucker, Dean of Gloucester, 1745. Matthew Arnold's Famous Opposition Between Culture and Anarchy Can, Perhaps, Be Seen as One Way of Constructing an Opposition Between Rhetoric and Violence. Rhetoric, at Least The'legitimate'rhetoric of the Classic Text, Becomes a Machine to Overcome Time, a Transhistorical Reason. [REVIEW]Peter Stallybrass - 1985 - Semiotica 54:113.
     
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  3.  14
    Christianity, Commerce and the Canon: Josiah Tucker and Richard Woodward on Political Economy.B. W. Young - 1996 - History of European Ideas 22 (5-6):385-400.
  4.  16
    A Treatise Concerning Civil Government.Josiah Tucker - 1781 - New York: A. M. Kelley.
    ... Foundation of Civil Government, according to Mr. Locke and his ...
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  5.  18
    A Science of Concord: The Politics of Commercial Knowledge in Mid-Eighteenth-Century Britain.Jon Cooper - forthcoming - Intellectual History Review.
    This article recovers mid-century proposals for sciences of concord and contextualizes them as part of a broader politics of commercial knowledge in eighteenth-century Britain. It begins by showing how merchants gained authority as formulators of commercial policy during the Commerce Treaty debates of 1713–1714. This authority held fast during the Walpolean oligarchy, but collapsed by the 1740s, when lobbying and patronage were increasingly maligned as corrupt by a ferment of popular republicanism. The article then explores how the Anglican cleric (...) Tucker and country pamphleteer Joseph Massie made use of this vacuum in authority to formulate a novel basis for the production of commercial knowledge. In pamphlets written between 1749 and 1760, they argued that the competing interests comprising the nation’s increasingly complex commercial system could only be reconciled and geared to the national interest through the establishment of a science which harnessed an impartial and systematizing epistemology, developing highly idealized accounts of the abstract market as a realm of concord which operated according to regular, rationally deducible principles. The conclusion suggests that their arguments introduced the foundational conceptual bases for later sciences of political economy and legitimated a new form of expertise in statecraft. (shrink)
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  6.  54
    Bentham and the Development of the British Critique of Colonialism.Peter J. Cain - 2011 - Utilitas 23 (1):1-24.
    This article examines Bentham's contribution to anti-colonial thought in the context of the development of the British radical movement that attacked colonialism on the grounds that it advantaged what Bentham called the at the expense of the . It shows that Bentham was influenced as much by Josiah Tucker and James Anderson as by Adam Smith. Bentham's early economic critique is examined, and the sharp changes in his arguments after 1800 assessed, in the context of the American and (...)
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  7. The End of Empire and the Death of Religion : A Reconsideration of Hume's Later Political Thought.Moritz Baumstark - 2012 - In Ruth Savage (ed.), Philosophy and Religion in Enlightenment Britain: New Case Studies. Oxford University Press.
    This essay reconsiders David Hume’s thinking on the fate of the British Empire and the future of established religion. It provides a detailed reconstruction of the development of Hume’s views on Britain’s successive attempts to impose or regain its authority over its North American colonies and compares these views with the stance taken during the American Crisis by Adam Smith and Josiah Tucker. Fresh light is shed on this area of Hume’s later political thought by a new letter, (...)
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  8.  8
    The Interpretation of Locke’s Two Treatises in Britain, 1778–1956.James A. Harris - 2020 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 28 (3):483-500.
    This paper describes how Locke’s Two Treatises of Government was read in Britain from Josiah Tucker to Peter Laslett. It focuses in particular upon how Locke’s readers responded to his detailed and...
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  9.  71
    The Influence of Utilitarianism on Natural Rights Doctrines: Gregory I. Molivas.Gregory I. Molivas - 1997 - Utilitas 9 (2):183-202.
    This paper shows that the perceived difference between utilitarianism and natural rights theories in the eighteenth century was much less sharp than that in the twentieth century. This is demonstrated by exploring Josiah Tucker's critique of Locke and his disciples and the way in which the latter responded to it. Tucker's critique of Locke was based on a sharp distinction between a conception of natural rights as individual entitlements and the conception of the public good. The disciples (...)
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  10.  28
    The Basic Writings of Josiah Royce.Josiah Royce, John J. Mcdermott & Ignas K. Skrupskelis - 1969 - University of Chicago Press.
    Now back in print, and in paperback, these two classicvolumes illustrate the scope and quality of Royce’sthought, providing the most comprehensive selection ofhis writings currently available. They offer a detailedpresentation of the viable relationship Royce forgedbetween the local experience of community and thedemands of a philosophical and scientific vision ofthe human situation.The selections reprinted here are basic to any understandingof Royce’s thought and its pressing relevanceto contemporary cultural, moral, and religious issues.
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  11.  49
    Quasi-Rights: Participatory Citizenship and Negative Liberties in Democratic Athens: Josiah Ober.Josiah Ober - 2000 - Social Philosophy and Policy 17 (1):27-61.
    The relationship between participatory democracy and constitutional liberalism is a famously troubled one. The purpose of this essay is to suggest that, at least under certain historical conditions, participatory democracy will indeed support the establishment of constitutional liberalism. That is to say, the development of institutions, behavioral habits, and social values centered on the active participation of free and equal citizens in democratic politics can lead to the extension of legally enforced immunities from coercion to citizens and noncitizens alike. Such (...)
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  12. The Letters of Josiah Royce.Josiah Royce - 1970 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
     
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  13. The Philosophy of Josiah Royce.Josiah Royce - 1971 - New York: Crowell.
  14.  26
    An Unpublished Logic Paper by Josiah Royce.Robert W. Burch & Josiah Royce - 1987 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 23 (2):173 - 204.
  15. Josiah Royce Selected Writings.Josiah Royce, William Kluback & John Edwin Smith - 1988
     
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  16.  28
    Tucker's Choephori of Aeschylus Tucker's Choephori of Aeschylus.T. G. Tucker - 1903 - The Classical Review 17 (02):125-128.
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  17. Critical Responses to Josiah Royce, 1885-1916 / Edited and Introduced by Randall E. Auxier.Josiah Royce & Randall E. Auxier - 2000
     
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  18. The Religious Philosophy of Josiah Royce.Josiah Royce - 1952 - Greenwood Press.
    The possibility of error.--Individuality and freedom.--The temporal and the eternal.--The conception of immortality.--Loyalty and religion.--The idea of the universal community.--The moral burden of the individual.--The realm of grace.--Time and guilt.--Atonement.
     
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  19. The Religious Philosophy of Josiah Royce; Edited, with an Introductory Essay, by Stuart Gerry Brown.Josiah Royce - 1952 - [Syracuse, N.Y.]Syracuse University Press.
     
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  20. Why Open-Minded People Should Endorse Dogmatism.Chris Tucker - 2010 - Philosophical Perspectives 24 (1):529-545.
    Open-minded people should endorse dogmatism because of its explanatory power. Dogmatism holds that, in the absence of defeaters, a seeming that P necessarily provides non-inferential justification for P. I show that dogmatism provides an intuitive explanation of four issues concerning non-inferential justification. It is particularly impressive that dogmatism can explain these issues because prominent epistemologists have argued that it can’t address at least two of them. Prominent epistemologists also object that dogmatism is absurdly permissive because it allows a seeming to (...)
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  21.  76
    The Philosophy of Loyalty.Josiah Royce - 1908 - New York: Hafner Pub. Co..
    Josiah Royce was born in California where he began his teaching career.
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  22. The Life and Philosophy of George Tucker.George Tucker - 2004 - Thoemmes Continuum.
    v. 1. Tucker's life and writings -- v. 2. Essays on various subjects of taste, morals, and national policy -- v. 3. A voyage to the moon -- v. 4. Essays, moral and metaphysical.
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  23.  64
    Our Knowledge of the Past: A Philosophy of Historiography.Aviezer Tucker - 2004 - Cambridge University Press.
    How do historians, comparative linguists, biblical and textual critics and evolutionary biologists establish beliefs about the past? How do they know the past? This book presents a philosophical analysis of the disciplines that offer scientific knowledge of the past. Using the analytic tools of contemporary epistemology and philosophy of science the book covers such topics as evidence, theory, methodology, explanation, determination and underdetermination, coincidence, contingency and counterfactuals in historiography. Aviezer Tucker's central claim is that historiography as a scientific discipline (...)
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  24. Seemings and Justification: New Essays on Dogmatism and Phenomenal Conservatism.Chris Tucker (ed.) - 2013 - Oxford University Press USA.
    The primary aim of this book is to understand how seemings relate to justification and whether some version of dogmatism or phenomenal conservatism can be sustained. It also addresses a number of other issues, including the nature of seemings, cognitive penetration, Bayesianism, and the epistemology of morality and disagreement.
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  25. Seemings and Justification: An Introduction.Chris Tucker - 2013 - In Seemings and Justification: New Essays on Dogmatism and Phenomenal Conservatism. Oxford University Press. pp. 1-29.
    It is natural to think that many of our beliefs are rational because they are based on seemings, or on the way things seem. This is especially clear in the case of perception. Many of our mathematical, moral, and memory beliefs also appear to be based on seemings. In each of these cases, it is natural to think that our beliefs are not only based on a seeming, but also that they are rationally based on these seemings—at least assuming there (...)
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  26. When Transmission Fails.Chris Tucker - 2010 - Philosophical Review 119 (4):497-529.
    The Neo-Moorean Deduction (I have a hand, so I am not a brain-in-a-vat) and the Zebra Deduction (the creature is a zebra, so isn’t a cleverly disguised mule) are notorious. Crispin Wright, Martin Davies, Fred Dretske, and Brian McLaughlin, among others, argue that these deductions are instances of transmission failure. That is, they argue that these deductions cannot transmit justification to their conclusions. I contend, however, that the notoriety of these deductions is undeserved. My strategy is to clarify, attack, defend, (...)
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  27.  41
    Parliamentary Sovereignty and the Ingenuity of the Human Rights Act: A Review of Aileen Kavanagh's Constitutional Review Under the UK Human Rights Act by Adam Tucker[REVIEW]Adam Tucker - 2012 - Jurisprudence 3 (1):307-318.
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  28. If Dogmatists Have a Problem with Cognitive Penetration, You Do Too.Chris Tucker - 2014 - Dialectica 68 (1):35-62.
    Perceptual dogmatism holds that if it perceptually seems to S that P, then S thereby has prima facie perceptual justification for P. But suppose Wishful Willy's desire for gold cognitively penetrates his perceptual experience and makes it seem to him that the yellow object is a gold nugget. Intuitively, his desire-penetrated seeming can't provide him with prima facie justification for thinking that the object is gold. If this intuitive response is correct, dogmatists have a problem. But if dogmatists have a (...)
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  29. Royce's Logical Essays Collected Logical Essays of Josiah Royce.Josiah Royce & Daniel Sommer Robinson - 1951 - Wm. C. Brown.
     
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  30.  18
    Asymmetric Neural Control Systems in Human Self-Regulation.Don M. Tucker & Peter A. Williamson - 1984 - Psychological Review 91 (2):185-215.
  31. Phenomenal Conservatism and Evidentialism in Religious Epistemology.Chris Tucker - 2011 - In Kelly James Clark & Raymond J. VanArragon (eds.), Evidence and Religious Belief. Oxford University Press. pp. 52--73.
    Phenomenal conservatism holds, roughly, that if it seems to S that P, then S has evidence for P. I argue for two main conclusions. The first is that phenomenal conservatism is better suited than is proper functionalism to explain how a particular type of religious belief formation can lead to non-inferentially justified religious beliefs. The second is that phenomenal conservatism makes evidence so easy to obtain that the truth of evidentialism would not be a significant obstacle to justified religious belief. (...)
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  32. Satisficing and Motivated Submaximization (in the Philosophy of Religion).Chris Tucker - 2016 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 93 (1):127-143.
    In replying to certain objections to the existence of God, Robert Adams, Bruce Langtry, and Peter van Inwagen assume that God can appropriately choose a suboptimal world, a world less good than some other world God could have chosen. A number of philosophers, such as Michael Slote and Klaas Kraay, claim that these theistic replies are therefore committed to the claim that satisficing can be appropriate. Kraay argues that this commitment is a significant liability. I argue, however, that the relevant (...)
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  33. From an Axiological Standpoint.Miles Tucker - 2019 - Ratio 32 (2):131-138.
    I maintain that intrinsic value is the fundamental concept of axiology. Many contemporary philosophers disagree; they say the proper object of value theory is final value. I examine three accounts of the nature of final value: the first claims that final value is non‐instrumental value; the second claims that final value is the value a thing has as an end; the third claims that final value is ultimate or non‐derivative value. In each case, I argue that the concept of final (...)
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  34. Acquaintance and Fallible Non-Inferential Justification.Chris Tucker - 2016 - In Michael Bergmann & Brett Coppenger (eds.), Intellectual Assurance: Essays on Traditional Epistemic Internalism. Oxford University Press. pp. 43-60.
    Classical acquaintance theory is any version of classical foundationalism that appeals to acquaintance in order to account for non-inferential justification. Such theories are well suited to account for a kind of infallible non-inferential justification. Why am I justified in believing that I’m in pain? An initially attractive (partial) answer is that I’m acquainted with my pain. But since I can’t be acquainted with what isn’t there, acquaintance with my pain guarantees that I’m in pain. What’s less clear is whether, given (...)
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  35. Movin' on Up: Higher-Level Requirements and Inferential Justification.Chris Tucker - 2012 - Philosophical Studies 157 (3):323-340.
    Does inferential justification require the subject to be aware that her premises support her conclusion? Externalists tend to answer “no” and internalists tend to answer “yes”. In fact, internalists often hold the strong higher-level requirement that an argument justifies its conclusion only if the subject justifiably believes that her premises support her conclusion. I argue for a middle ground. Against most externalists, I argue that inferential justification requires that one be aware that her premises support her conclusion. Against many internalists, (...)
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  36.  13
    The World and the Individual.Josiah Royce - 1900 - New York: Dover Publications.
    1st ser. The four historical conceptions of being.--2d ser. Nature, man, and the moral order.
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  37.  17
    Josiah Royce.Kelly A. Parker - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Josiah Royce (1855-1916) was the leading American proponent of absolute idealism, the metaphysical view (also maintained by G. W. F. Hegel and F. H. Bradley) that all aspects of reality, including those we experience as disconnected or contradictory, are ultimately unified in the thought of a single all-encompassing consciousness. Royce also made original contributions in ethics, philosophy of community, philosophy of religion and logic. His major works include The Religious Aspect of Philosophy (1885), The World and the Individual (1899-1901), (...)
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  38.  71
    The Original Meaning of "Democracy": Capacity to Do Things, Not Majority Rule.Josiah Ober - 2008 - Constellations 15 (1):3-9.
  39. The Pen, the Dress, and the Coat: A Confusion in Goodness.Miles Tucker - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (7):1911-1922.
    Conditionalists say that the value something has as an end—its final value—may be conditional on its extrinsic features. They support this claim by appealing to examples: Kagan points to Abraham Lincoln’s pen, Rabinowicz and Rønnow-Rasmussen to Lady Diana’s dress, and Korsgaard to a mink coat. They contend that these things may have final value in virtue of their historical or societal roles. These three examples have become familiar: many now merely mention them to establish the conditionalist position. But the widespread (...)
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  40.  32
    Representing Number in the Real-Time Processing of Agreement: Self-Paced Reading Evidence From Arabic.Matthew A. Tucker, Ali Idrissi & Diogo Almeida - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  41.  16
    Outlines of Cosmic Philosophy : Based on the Doctrine of Evolution, with Criticisms on the Positive Philosophy / by John Fiske ; with an Introduction by Josiah Royce ... ; in Four Volumes. [REVIEW]John Fiske, Josiah Royce & Edward Curtis Smith - unknown
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  42.  1
    Race Questions, Provincialism, and Other American Problems: Expanded Edition.Josiah Royce - 2020 - Fordham University Press.
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  43.  58
    Deaf Culture, Cochlear Implants, and Elective Disability.Bonnie Poitras Tucker - 1998 - Hastings Center Report 28 (4):6-14.
  44. How to Explain Miscomputation.Chris Tucker - 2018 - Philosophers' Imprint 18:1-17.
    Just as theory of representation is deficient if it can’t explain how misrepresentation is possible, a theory of computation is deficient if it can’t explain how miscomputation is possible. Nonetheless, philosophers have generally ignored miscomputation. My primary goal in this paper is to clarify both what miscomputation is and how to adequately explain it. Miscomputation is a special kind of malfunction: a system miscomputes when it computes in a way that it shouldn’t. To explain miscomputation, you must provide accounts of (...)
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  45.  19
    Mind From Body: Experience From Neural Structure.Don M. Tucker - 2007 - Oup Usa.
    The neural structures of the brain exist to construct information. They do this by creating concepts that relate internal, personal need to external, environmental reality. Meaning is formed in the brain by neural network patterns that traverse these two structures of experience: the visceral nervous system and the somatic nervous system. How exactly does the brain get from constructing information to creating meaning, and what can this process tell us about the nature of experience? This book addresses both of these (...)
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  46.  19
    – Ίδ–.Elizabeth Tucker - 1977 - The Classical Review 27 (02):205-.
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  47.  15
    Appearance and Reality.Josiah Royce - 1894 - Philosophical Review 3 (2):212.
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  48.  6
    Josiah Royce in Focus.Jacquelyn Ann K. Kegley - 2008 - Indiana University Press.
    This new approach to Josiah Royce shows one of American philosophy's brightest minds in action for today's readers. Although Royce was one of the towering figures of American pragmatism, his thought is often considered in the wake of his more famous peers. Jacquelyn Ann K. Kegley brings fresh perspective to Royce's ideas and clarifies his individual philosophical vision. Kegley foregrounds Royce's concern with contemporary public issues and ethics, focusing in particular on how he addresses long-standing problems such as race, (...)
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  49. Paradoxes of Intensionality.Dustin Tucker & Richmond H. Thomason - 2011 - Review of Symbolic Logic 4 (3):394-411.
    We identify a class of paradoxes that is neither set-theoretical nor semantical, but that seems to depend on intensionality. In particular, these paradoxes arise out of plausible properties of propositional attitudes and their objects. We try to explain why logicians have neglected these paradoxes, and to show that, like the Russell Paradox and the direct discourse Liar Paradox, these intensional paradoxes are recalcitrant and challenge logical analysis. Indeed, when we take these paradoxes seriously, we may need to rethink the commonly (...)
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  50. Two Kinds of Value Pluralism.Miles Tucker - 2016 - Utilitas 28 (3):333-346.
    I argue that there are two distinct views called ‘value pluralism’ in contemporary axiology, but that these positions have not been properly distinguished. The first kind of pluralism, weak pluralism, is the view philosophers have in mind when they say that there are many things that are valuable. It is also the kind of pluralism that philosophers like Moore, Brentano and Chisholm were interested in. The second kind of pluralism, strong pluralism, is the view philosophers have in mind when they (...)
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