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  1.  58
    Neuroimaging and Disorders of Consciousness: Envisioning an Ethical Research Agenda.Joseph J. Fins, Judy Illes, James L. Bernat, Joy Hirsch, Steven Laureys & Emily Murphy - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (9):3 – 12.
    The application of neuroimaging technology to the study of the injured brain has transformed how neuroscientists understand disorders of consciousness, such as the vegetative and minimally conscious states, and deepened our understanding of mechanisms of recovery. This scientific progress, and its potential clinical translation, provides an opportunity for ethical reflection. It was against this scientific backdrop that we convened a conference of leading investigators in neuroimaging, disorders of consciousness and neuroethics. Our goal was to develop an ethical frame to move (...)
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  2.  2
    Distributed Neural Activity Patterns During Human-to-Human Competition.Matthew Piva, Xian Zhang, J. Adam Noah, Steve W. C. Chang & Joy Hirsch - 2017 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 11.
  3.  8
    Self-Specific Priming Effect.Alessia Pannese & Joy Hirsch - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (4):962-968.
    Priority of the “self” is thought to be evolutionarily advantageous. However, evidence for this priority has been sparse. In this study, subjects performed a gender categorization task on self- and non-self target faces preceded by either congruent or incongruent periliminal or subliminal primes. We found that subliminal primes induced a priming effect only on self target faces. This discovery of a self-specific priming effect suggests that functional specificity for faces may include timing as well as spatial adaptations.
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    Unconscious Neural Specificity for Self and the Brainstem.Alessia Pannese & Joy Hirsch - 2013 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 20 (1-2):1-2.
    The self/non-self distinction is essential for survival, but its neural bases are poorly understood. Studies have sought neural specificity for 'self ' in cortical regions. However, behavioural evidence showing that humans are able to single out self-relevant information in the absence of awareness suggests that the cognitive self/non-self distinction might be rooted in subcortical structures involved in automatic, unconscious functions. Here we employ subliminal presentation of self and non-self faces and repetition suppression to show neural specificity for 'self ' in (...)
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  5. Participants of the Working Meeting on Ethics, Neuroimaging and Limited States of Consciousness. Neuroimaging and Disorders of Consciousness: Envisioning an Ethical Research Agenda.Joseph J. Fins, Judy Illes, James L. Bernat, Joy Hirsch, Steven Laureys & Emily Murphy - 2008 - Am J Bioethics 8 (9):3-12.
     
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  6. Brain Activity Classifies Adolescents with and Without a Familial History of Substance Use Disorders.Jianping Qiao, Zhishun Wang, Lupo Geronazzo-Alman, Lawrence Amsel, Cristiane Duarte, Seonjoo Lee, George Musa, Jun Long, Xiaofu He, Thao Doan, Joy Hirsch & Christina W. Hoven - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.