Results for 'Joyce Kerr Tarpley'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  18
    Manhood and Happiness in Emma.Joyce Kerr Tarpley - 2018 - Renascence 70 (1):23-41.
    Among Austen commentators, the traditional view of manhood holds that it is innate, “‘a matter of course,’ a given quality of a man’s nature”. However, since the 90’s, this view has been contested, especially in Emma, with the argument that “masculinity is something the novel contests and constructs”. In “Manhood and Happiness in Emma: Liberal Learning and Practicing the Language of Marriage,” I frame Austen’s understanding of manhood in terms of education. In order to become the man he ought to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  18
    Sonship, Liberty, and Promise Keeping in Sense and Sensibility.Joyce Kerr Tarpley - 2011 - Renascence 63 (2):91-109.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  13
    Revealing the Scapegoat Mechanism: Christianity After Girard: Fergus Kerr.Fergus Kerr - 1992 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 32:161-175.
    The philosophy of religion, as commonly understood by Christians in both the Catholic and Reformed traditions, whether they think it a worthwhile enterprise or not, begins with arguments for the existence of a deity, proceeds to show that this deity is necessarily unique, eternal, and suchlike, and leaves it to reflection on divine revelation to consider whether this deity might be properly designated as ‘three persons in one nature’. Much later, after discussing the metaphysical implications of the incarnation of the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  6
    Kerr on Cartesianism in Catholic Thought: Right or Wrong?Illtyd Trethowan & Fergus Kerr - 1984 - New Blackfriars 65 (773):473-486.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  5
    Getting the Subject Back Into the World: Heidegger's Version: Fergus Kerr.Fergus Kerr - 1991 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 29:173-190.
    In a footnote to the preface to the second edition of his Critique of Pure Reason Kant remarked that ‘it still remains a scandal to philosophy and to human reason in general that the existence [ Dasein ] of things outside us … must be accepted on faith , and that if anyone thinks good to doubt their existence, we are unable to counter his doubts by any satisfactory proof’ . In Being and Time Heidegger remarks, somewhat less famously, that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. The Evolution of Morality.Richard Joyce - 2005 - Bradford.
    Moral thinking pervades our practical lives, but where did this way of thinking come from, and what purpose does it serve? Is it to be explained by environmental pressures on our ancestors a million years ago, or is it a cultural invention of more recent origin? In The Evolution of Morality, Richard Joyce takes up these controversial questions, finding that the evidence supports an innate basis to human morality. As a moral philosopher, Joyce is interested in whether any (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   242 citations  
  7. The Myth of Morality.Richard Joyce - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    In The Myth of Morality, Richard Joyce argues that moral discourse is hopelessly flawed. At the heart of ordinary moral judgements is a notion of moral inescapability, or practical authority, which, upon investigation, cannot be reasonably defended. Joyce argues that natural selection is to blame, in that it has provided us with a tendency to invest the world with values that it does not contain, and demands that it does not make. Should we therefore do away with morality, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   115 citations  
  8. Essays in Moral Skepticism.Richard Joyce - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Moral skepticism is the denial that there is any such thing as moral knowledge. Since the publication of The Myth of Morality in 2001, Richard Joyce has explored the terrain of moral skepticism and has been willing to advocate versions of this radical view. Joyce's attitude toward morality is analogous to an atheist's attitude toward religion: he claims that in making moral judgments speakers attempt to state truths but that the world isn't furnished with the properties and relations (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  9.  44
    Bayesianism.James M. Joyce - 2004 - In Piers Rawling & Alfred R. Mele (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Rationality. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 132--155.
    Bayesianism claims to provide a unified theory of epistemic and practical rationality based on the principle of mathematical expectation. In its epistemic guise it requires believers to obey the laws of probability. In its practical guise it asks agents to maximize their subjective expected utility. Joyce’s primary concern is Bayesian epistemology, and its five pillars: people have beliefs and conditional beliefs that come in varying gradations of strength; a person believes a proposition strongly to the extent that she presupposes (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  10. Error Theory.Richard Joyce - unknown
    To hold an error theory about morality is to endorse a kind of radical moral skepticism—a skepticism analogous to atheism in the religious domain. The atheist thinks that religious utterances, such as “God loves you,” really are truth-evaluable assertions (as opposed to being veiled commands or expressions of hope, etc.), but that the world just doesn’t contain the items (e.g., God) necessary to render such assertions true. Similarly, the moral error theorist maintains that moral judgments are truth-evaluable assertions (thus contrasting (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  11. Nihilism.Richard Joyce - unknown
    “Nihilism” (from the Latin “nihil” meaning nothing) is not a well-defined term. One can be a nihilist about just about anything: A philosopher who does not believe in the existence of knowledge, for example, might be called an “epistemological nihilist”; an atheist might be called a “religious nihilist.” In the vicinity of ethics, one should take care to distinguish moral nihilism from political nihilism and from existential nihilism. These last two will be briefly discussed below, only with the aim of (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12.  7
    That Was Then, This is Now: The Understanding of Authority and Obedience by a Selected Group of Women Religious in Australia.Rosemarie Joyce - 2017 - The Australasian Catholic Record 94 (3):305.
    Joyce, Rosemarie Since the middle of last century, there has been a gradual change in Australian society with regard to how one understands and practises authority and obedience. In the past, those who were in positions of authority, be it church or civil, could expect to be revered and their decisions to be obeyed even if there was no personal agreement with the decision in question. But the situation has changed and continues to change. Many would agree that those (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. A Nonpragmatic Vindication of Probabilism.James Joyce - 1998 - Philosophy of Science 65 (4):575-603.
    The pragmatic character of the Dutch book argument makes it unsuitable as an "epistemic" justification for the fundamental probabilist dogma that rational partial beliefs must conform to the axioms of probability. To secure an appropriately epistemic justification for this conclusion, one must explain what it means for a system of partial beliefs to accurately represent the state of the world, and then show that partial beliefs that violate the laws of probability are invariably less accurate than they could be otherwise. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   264 citations  
  14. Accuracy and Coherence: Prospects for an Alethic Epistemology of Partial Belief.James Joyce - 2009 - In Franz Huber & Christoph Schmidt-Petri (eds.), Degrees of Belief. Synthese. pp. 263-297.
  15. A Defense of Imprecise Credences in Inference and Decision Making1.James M. Joyce - 2010 - Philosophical Perspectives 24 (1):281-323.
  16. How Degrees of Belief Reflect Evidence.James Joyce - 2005 - Philosophical Perspectives 19 (1):153-179.
  17. Moral Anti-Realism.Richard Joyce - 2015 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    It might be expected that it would suffice for the entry for “moral anti-realism” to contain only some links to other entries in this encyclopedia. It could contain a link to “moral realism” and stipulate the negation of the view there described. Alternatively, it could have links to the entries “anti-realism” and “morality” and could stipulate the conjunction of the materials contained therein. The fact that neither of these approaches would be adequate—and, more strikingly, that following the two procedures would (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  18. By Eleanore Stump.Fergus Kerr - 2004 - Ars Disputandi 4.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. The Error In 'The Error In The Error Theory'.Richard Joyce - 2011 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 89 (3):519-534.
    In his paper ?The Error in the Error Theory?[this journal, 2008], Stephen Finlay attempts to show that the moral error theorist has not only failed to prove his case, but that the error theory is in fact false. This paper rebuts Finlay's arguments, criticizes his positive theory, and clarifies the error-theoretic position.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  20. Regret and Instability in Causal Decision Theory.James M. Joyce - 2012 - Synthese 187 (1):123-145.
    Andy Egan has recently produced a set of alleged counterexamples to causal decision theory in which agents are forced to decide among causally unratifiable options, thereby making choices they know they will regret. I show that, far from being counterexamples, CDT gets Egan's cases exactly right. Egan thinks otherwise because he has misapplied CDT by requiring agents to make binding choices before they have processed all available information about the causal consequences of their acts. I elucidate CDT in a way (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  21. Individualist and Multi-Level Perspectives on Selection in Structured Populations.Benjamin Kerr & Peter Godfrey-Smith - 2002 - Biology and Philosophy 17 (4):477-517.
    Recent years have seen a renewed debate over the importance of groupselection, especially as it relates to the evolution of altruism. Onefeature of this debate has been disagreement over which kinds ofprocesses should be described in terms of selection at multiple levels,within and between groups. Adapting some earlier discussions, we presenta mathematical framework that can be used to explore the exactrelationships between evolutionary models that do, and those that donot, explicitly recognize biological groups as fitness-bearing entities.We show a fundamental set (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   45 citations  
  22. Burge’s Defense of Perceptual Content.Todd Ganson, Ben Bronner & Alex Kerr - 2014 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 88 (3):556-573.
    A central question, if not the central question, of philosophy of perception is whether sensory states have a nature similar to thoughts about the world, whether they are essentially representational. According to the content view, at least some of our sensory states are, at their core, representations with contents that are either accurate or inaccurate. Tyler Burge’s Origins of Objectivity is the most sustained and sophisticated defense of the content view to date. His defense of the view is problematic in (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  23. Land Use Mapping.Jeremy T. Kerr & Josef Cihlar - 2004 - In Kimberly Kempf-Leonard (ed.), Encyclopedia of Social Measurement. Elsevier. pp. 441--451.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Moral Fictionalism.Richard Joyce - 2011 - Philosophy Now 82:14-17.
    Were I not afraid of appearing too philosophical, I should remind my reader of that famous doctrine, supposed to be fully proved in modern times, “That tastes and colours, and all other sensible qualities, lie not in the bodies, but merely in the senses.” The case is the same with beauty and deformity, virtue and vice. This doctrine, however, takes off no more from the reality of the latter qualities, than from that of the former; nor need it give any (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  25. Gestalt-Switching and the Evolutionary Transitions.P. Godfrey-Smith & B. Kerr - 2013 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 64 (1):205-222.
    Formal methods developed for modeling levels of selection problems have recently been applied to the investigation of major evolutionary transitions. We discuss two new tools of this kind. First, the ‘near-variant test’ can be used to compare the causal adequacy of predictively equivalent representations. Second, ‘state-variable gestalt-switching’ can be used to gain a useful dual perspective on evolutionary processes that involve both higher and lower level populations.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  26.  84
    Cooperation and its Evolution.Kim Sterelny, Richard Joyce, Brett Calcott & Ben Fraser (eds.) - 2013 - MIT Press.
    This collection reports on the latest research on an increasingly pivotal issue for evolutionary biology: cooperation. The chapters are written from a variety of disciplinary perspectives and utilize research tools that range from empirical survey to conceptual modeling, reflecting the rich diversity of work in the field. They explore a wide taxonomic range, concentrating on bacteria, social insects, and, especially, humans. -/- Part I (“Agents and Environments”) investigates the connections of social cooperation in social organizations to the conditions that make (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  27. Metaethics and the Empirical Sciences.Richard Joyce - 2006 - Philosophical Explorations 9 (1):133 – 148.
    What contribution can the empirical sciences make to metaethics? This paper outlines an argument to a particular metaethical conclusion - that moral judgments are epistemically unjustified - that depends in large part on a posteriori premises.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  28.  81
    Levi on Causal Decision Theory and the Possibility of Predicting One's Own Actions.James M. Joyce - 2002 - Philosophical Studies 110 (1):69 - 102.
    Isaac Levi has long criticized causal decisiontheory on the grounds that it requiresdeliberating agents to make predictions abouttheir own actions. A rational agent cannot, heclaims, see herself as free to choose an actwhile simultaneously making a prediction abouther likelihood of performing it. Levi is wrongon both points. First, nothing in causaldecision theory forces agents to makepredictions about their own acts. Second,Levi's arguments for the ``deliberation crowdsout prediction thesis'' rely on a flawed modelof the measurement of belief. Moreover, theability of agents (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  29. Confirmation.Alan Hájek & James M. Joyce - 2008 - In S. Psillos & M. Curd (eds.), The Routledge Companion to the Philosophy of Science. Routledge.
    Confirmation theory is intended to codify the evidential bearing of observations on hypotheses, characterizing relations of inductive “support” and “counter­support” in full generality. The central task is to understand what it means to say that datum E confirms or supports a hypothesis H when E does not logically entail H.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  30. What is Altruism?Benjamin Kerr, Peter Godfrey-Smith & Marcus W. Feldman - unknown
    Altruism is generally understood to be behavior that benefits others at a personal cost to the behaving individual. However, within evolutionary biology, different authors have interpreted the concept of altruism differently, leading to dissimilar predictions about the evolution of altruistic behavior. Generally, different interpretations diverge on which party receives the benefit from altruism and on how the cost of altruism is assessed. Using a simple trait-group framework, we delineate the assumptions underlying different interpretations and show how they relate to one (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  31.  92
    A World Without Values.Richard Joyce & Simon Kirchin - 2010 - Springer.
    Taking as its point of departure the work of moral philosopher John Mackie (1917-1981), A World Without Values is a collection of essays on moral skepticism by leading contemporary philosophers, some of whom are sympathetic to Mackie s ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  32. Is Moral Projectivism Empirically Tractable?Richard Joyce - 2009 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (1):53 - 75.
    Different versions of moral projectivism are delineated: minimal, metaphysical, nihilistic, and noncognitivist. Minimal projectivism (the focus of this paper) is the conjunction of two subtheses: (1) that we experience morality as an objective aspect of the world and (2) that this experience has its origin in an affective attitude (e.g., an emotion) rather than in perceptual faculties. Both are empirical claims and must be tested as such. This paper does not offer ideas on any specific test procedures, but rather undertakes (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  33.  60
    Morality, Schmorality.Richard Joyce - 2007 - In Paul Bloomfield (ed.), Morality and Self-Interest. Oxford University Press.
    In his contribution to this volume, Paul Bloomfield analyzes and attempts to answer the question “Why is it bad to be bad?” I too will use this question as my point of departure; in particular I want to approach the matter from the perspective of a moral error theorist. This discussion will preface one of the principal topics of this paper: the relationship between morality and self-interest. Again, my main goal is to clarify what the moral error theorist might say (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  34.  72
    Bayes' Theorem.James Joyce - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Bayes' Theorem is a simple mathematical formula used for calculating conditional probabilities. It figures prominently in subjectivist or Bayesian approaches to epistemology, statistics, and inductive logic. Subjectivists, who maintain that rational belief is governed by the laws of probability, lean heavily on conditional probabilities in their theories of evidence and their models of empirical learning. Bayes' Theorem is central to these enterprises both because it simplifies the calculation of conditional probabilities and because it clarifies significant features of subjectivist position. Indeed, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  35. Theistic Ethics and the Euthyphro Dilemma.Richard Joyce - 2002 - Journal of Religious Ethics 30 (1):49-75.
    It is widely believed that the Divine Command Theory is untenable due to the Euthyphro Dilemma. This article first examines the Platonic dialogue of that name, and shows that Socrates’s reasoning is faulty. Second, the dilemma in the form in which many contemporary philosophers accept it is examined in detail, and this reasoning is also shown to be deficient. This is not to say, however, that the Divine Command Theory is true—merely that one popular argument for rejecting it is unsound. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  36. Causal Reasoning and Backtracking.James M. Joyce - 2010 - Philosophical Studies 147 (1):139 - 154.
    I argue that one central aspect of the epistemology of causation, the use of causes as evidence for their effects, is largely independent of the metaphysics of causation. In particular, I use the formalism of Bayesian causal graphs to factor the incremental evidential impact of a cause for its effect into a direct cause-to-effect component and a backtracking component. While the “backtracking” evidence that causes provide about earlier events often obscures things, once we our restrict attention to the cause-to-effect component (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  37. The Many Moral Nativisms.Richard Joyce - 2013 - In Kim Sterelny, Richard Joyce, Brett Calcott & Ben Fraser (eds.), Cooperation and its Evolution. MIT Press. pp. 549--572.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  38. The ‘Extendedness’ of Scientific Evidence.Eric Kerr & Axel Gelfert - 2014 - Philosophical Issues 24 (1):253-281.
    In recent years, the idea has been gaining ground that our traditional conceptions of knowledge and cognition are unduly limiting, in that they privilege what goes on inside the ‘skin and skull’ of an individual reasoner. Instead, it has been argued, knowledge and cognition need to be understood as embodied, situated, and extended. Whether these various interrelations and dependencies are ‘merely’ causal, or are in a more fundamental sense constitutive of knowledge and cognition, is as much a matter of controversy (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  39.  35
    Unintended Changes in Cognition, Mood, and Behavior Arising From Cell-Based Interventions for Neurological Conditions: Ethical Challenges.P. S. Duggan, A. W. Siegel, D. M. Blass, H. Bok, J. T. Coyle, R. Faden, J. Finkel, J. D. Gearhart, H. T. Greely, A. Hillis, A. Hoke, R. Johnson, M. Johnston, J. Kahn, D. Kerr & P. King - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (5):31-36.
    The prospect of using cell-based interventions to treat neurological conditions raises several important ethical and policy questions. In this target article, we focus on issues related to the unique constellation of traits that characterize CBIs targeted at the central nervous system. In particular, there is at least a theoretical prospect that these cells will alter the recipients' cognition, mood, and behavior—brain functions that are central to our concept of the self. The potential for such changes, although perhaps remote, is cause (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  40. Irrealism and the Genealogy of Morals.Richard Joyce - 2013 - Ratio 26 (4):351-372.
    Facts about the evolutionary origins of morality may have some kind of undermining effect on morality, yet the arguments that advocate this view are varied not only in their strategies but in their conclusions. The most promising such argument is modest: it attempts to shift the burden of proof in the service of an epistemological conclusion. This paper principally focuses on two other debunking arguments. First, I outline the prospects of trying to establish an error theory on genealogical grounds. Second, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  41. Moral Fictionalism.Richard Joyce - 2005 - In Mark Eli Kalderon (ed.), Fictionalism in Metaphysics. Oxford University Press. pp. 287-313.
  42. Epistemic Deference: The Case of Chance.James Joyce - 2007 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 107 (2):187 - 206.
  43.  83
    Darwinian Ethics and Error.R. Joyce - 2000 - Biology and Philosophy 15 (5):713-732.
  44.  97
    Rational Fear of Monsters.R. Joyce - 2000 - British Journal of Aesthetics 40 (2):209-224.
    Colin Radford must weary of defending his thesis that the emotional reactions we have towards fictional characters, events, and states of affairs are irrational.1 Yet, for all the discussion, the issue has not, to my mind, been properly settled—or at least not settled in the manner I should prefer—and so this paper attempts once more to debunk Radford’s defiance of common sense. For some, the question of whether our emotional responses to fiction are rational does not arise, for they are (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  45.  63
    Theology After Wittgenstein.Fergus Kerr - 1986 - Blackwell.
  46. Taking Moral Skepticism Seriously.Richard Joyce - 2014 - Philosophical Studies 168 (3):843-851.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  47.  99
    Williamson on Evidence and Knowledge.Jim Joyce - 2004 - Philosophical Books 45 (4):296-305.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  48. Cheats as First Propagules: A New Hypothesis for the Evolution of Individuality During the Transition From Single Cells to Multicellularity.Paul B. Rainey & Benjamin Kerr - 2010 - Bioessays 32 (10):872-880.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  49.  67
    Replies. [REVIEW]Richard Joyce - 2008 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 77 (1):245-267.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  50.  74
    Psychological Fictionalism, and the Threat of Fictionalist Suicide.Richard Joyce - 2013 - The Monist 96 (4):517-538.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000