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Judith M. Burkart [11]Judith Maria Burkart [2]
  1.  51
    The Evolution of General Intelligence.Judith M. Burkart, Michèle N. Schubiger & Carel P. van Schaik - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
    The presence of general intelligence poses a major evolutionary puzzle, which has led to increased interest in its presence in nonhuman animals. The aim of this review is to critically evaluate this question and to explore the implications for current theories about the evolution of cognition. We first review domain-general and domain-specific accounts of human cognition in order to situate attempts to identify general intelligence in nonhuman animals. Recent studies are consistent with the presence of general intelligence in mammals. However, (...)
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  2.  83
    Evolutionary Precursors of Social Norms in Chimpanzees: A New Approach.Claudia Rudolf von Rohr, Judith M. Burkart & Carel P. van Schaik - 2011 - Biology and Philosophy 26 (1):1-30.
    Moral behaviour, based on social norms, is commonly regarded as a hallmark of humans. Hitherto, humans are perceived to be the only species possessing social norms and to engage in moral behaviour. There is anecdotal evidence suggesting their presence in chimpanzees, but systematic studies are lacking. Here, we examine the evolution of human social norms and their underlying psychological mechanisms. For this, we distinguish between conventions, cultural social norms and universal social norms. We aim at exploring whether chimpanzees possess evolutionary (...)
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  3.  47
    Explaining Brain Size Variation: From Social to Cultural Brain.Carel P. van Schaik, Karin Isler & Judith M. Burkart - 2012 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (5):277-284.
  4.  25
    Chimpanzees’ Bystander Reactions to Infanticide.Claudia Rudolf von Rohr, Carel P. van Schaik, Alexandra Kissling & Judith M. Burkart - 2015 - Human Nature 26 (2):143-160.
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  5.  12
    The Cooperative Breeding Perspective Helps in Pinning Down When Uniquely Human Evolutionary Processes Are Necessary—CORRIGENDUM.Judith Maria Burkart & Carel P. van Schaik - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39.
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  6. High Emotional Reactivity Toward an Experimenter Affects Participation, but Not Performance, in Cognitive Tests with Common Marmosets.Michèle N. Schubiger, Florian L. Wüstholz, André Wunder & Judith M. Burkart - 2015 - Animal Cognition 18 (3):701-712.
    When testing primates with cognitive tasks, it is usually not considered that subjects differ markedly in terms of emotional reactivity toward the experimenter, which potentially affects a subject’s cognitive performance. We addressed this issue in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus), a monkey species in which males tend to show stronger emotional reactivity in testing situations, whereas females have been reported to outperform males in cognitive tasks. In a two-phase experiment, we first quantified the emotional reactivity of 14 subjects toward four different (...)
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  7.  17
    Future Directions for Studying the Evolution of General Intelligence.Judith M. Burkart, Michèle N. Schubiger & Carel P. van Schaik - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
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  8.  11
    The Cooperative Breeding Perspective Helps in Pinning Down When Uniquely Human Evolutionary Processes Are Necessary.Judith Maria Burkart & Carel P. van Schaik - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39.
    The cultural group selection approach provides a compelling explanation for recent changes in human societies, but has trouble explaining why our ancestors, rather than any other great ape, evolved into a hyper-cooperative niche. The cooperative breeding hypothesis can plug this gap and thus complement CGS, because recent comparative evidence suggests that it promoted proactive prosociality, social transmission, and communication in Pleistocene hominins.
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  9.  41
    The Comparative Neuroprimatology 2018 Road Map for Research on How the Brain Got Language.Michael A. Arbib, Francisco Aboitiz, Judith M. Burkart, Michael C. Corballis, Gino Coudé, Erin Hecht, Katja Liebal, Masako Myowa-Yamakoshi, James Pustejovsky, Shelby S. Putt, Federico Rossano, Anne E. Russon, P. Thomas Schoenemann, Uwe Seifert, Katerina Semendeferi, Chris Sinha, Dietrich Stout, Virginia Volterra, Sławomir Wacewicz & Benjamin Wilson - 2018 - Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 19 (1-2):370-387.
    We present a new road map for research on “How the Brain Got Language” that adopts an EvoDevoSocio perspective and highlights comparative neuroprimatology – the comparative study of brain, behavior and communication in extant monkeys and great apes – as providing a key grounding for hypotheses on the last common ancestor of humans and monkeys and chimpanzees and the processes which guided the evolution LCA-m → LCA-c → protohumans → H. sapiens. Such research constrains and is constrained by analysis of (...)
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  10.  11
    Validity of Cognitive Tests for Non-Human Animals: Pitfalls and Prospects.Michèle N. Schubiger, Claudia Fichtel & Judith M. Burkart - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  11.  17
    The Moral Capacity as a Biological Adaptation: A Commentary on Tomasello.Carel P. van Schaik & Judith M. Burkart - 2018 - Philosophical Psychology 31 (5):703-721.
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  12.  5
    The Comparative Neuroprimatology 2018 (CNP-2018) Road Map for Research on How the Brain Got Language.Michael A. Arbib, Francisco Aboitiz, Judith M. Burkart, Michael Corballis, Gino Coudé, Erin Hecht, Katja Liebal, Masako Myowa-Yamakoshi, James Pustejovsky, Shelby Putt, Federico Rossano, Anne E. Russon, P. Thomas Schoenemann, Uwe Seifert, Katerina Semendeferi, Chris Sinha, Dietrich Stout, Virginia Volterra, Sławomir Wacewicz & Benjamin Wilson - 2018 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 19 (1-2):370-387.
    We present a new road map for research on “How the Brain Got Language” that adopts an EvoDevoSocio perspective and highlights comparative neuroprimatology – the comparative study of brain, behavior and communication in extant monkeys and great apes – as providing a key grounding for hypotheses on the last common ancestor of humans and monkeys and chimpanzees and the processes which guided the evolution LCA-m → LCA-c → protohumans → H. sapiens. Such research constrains and is constrained by analysis of (...)
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  13.  1
    Probleme aufgrund sozialer Ungleichheit: Ein Mismatch-Phänomen.Carel P. van Schaik & Judith M. Burkart - 2019 - In Gerald Hartung & Matthias Herrgen (eds.), Interdisziplinäre Anthropologie: Jahrbuch 7/2019: Soziale Ungleichheit. Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden. pp. 77-84.
    Vorrede | In diesem charakteristischerweise hervorragend recherchierten Beitrag erörtern Kappeler und Fichtel die Konsequenzen sozialer und einkommensbedingter Ungleichheit für die individuelle Gesundheit und die empfundene Einsamkeit aus einer evolutionären Perspektive. Das zentrale Argument der Autoren ist, dass sich die modernen Großgesellschaften, in denen fast alle Menschen heutzutage leben, grundsätzlich von den egalitären Kleingesellschaften unterscheiden, in denen wir evolviert sind und in denen wir bis vor lediglich 20.000 Jahren alle gelebt haben. Diese Zeitspanne war gemäß den meisten Schätzungen viel zu kurz, (...)
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