Search results for 'Judith Owen' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  12
    Judith Owen (2003). Ethics In Electra. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 53 (1):11-13.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  13
    Judith Owen (2003). ETHICS IN ELECTRA L. MacLeod: Dolos and Dike in Sophokles' Elektra. ( Mnemosyne Suppl. 219.) Pp. Viii + 210. Leiden, Boston, and Cologne: Brill, 2001. Cased, $73. ISBN: 90-04-11898-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 53 (01):11-.
  3. Malcolm Schofield, Martha Craven Nussbaum & G. E. L. Owen (1982). Language and Logos Studies in Ancient Greek Philosophy Presented to G.E.L. Owen /Edited by Malcolm Schofield and Martha Craven Nussbaum. --. --. [REVIEW] Cambridge University Press, 1982.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  6
    Robert Owen (1969). Robert Owen on Education. London: Cambridge University Press.
    Robert Owen was one of the most extraordinary Englishmen who ever lived and a great man. In a way his history is the history of the establishment of modern industrial Britain, reflected in the mind and activities of a very intelligent, capable and responsible industrialist, alive to the best social thought of his time. The organisation of industrial labour, factory legislation, education, trade unionism, co-operation, rationalism: he was passionately and ably engaged in all of them. His community at New (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  5.  12
    G. E. L. Owen, Malcolm Schofield & Martha Craven Nussbaum (eds.) (1982). Language and Logos: Studies in Ancient Greek Pgilosophy Presented to G.E.L. Owen. Cambridge University Press.
    The essays in this volume were written to celebrate the sixtieth birthday of G. E. L. Owen, who by his essays and seminars on ancient Greek philosophy has made a contribution to its study that is second to none. The authors, from both sides of the Atlantic, include not only scholars whose main research interests lie in Greek philosophy, but others best known for their work in general philosophy. All are pupils or younger colleagues of Professor Owen who (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  26
    D. K. Menon, A. M. Owen & John D. Pickard (1999). Response From Menon, Owen and Pickard. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (2):44-46.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  93
    G. E. L. Owen & M. Nussbaum (1988). Owen's Progress: Logic, Science, and Dialectic: Collected Papers in Greek Philosophy. Philosophical Review 97 (3):373-399.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  8.  12
    S. G. Owen (1904). Owen's Persius and Juvenal.—A Rejoinder. The Classical Review 18 (02):125-131.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  1
    H. P. Owen (1977). The Person of Christ in Recent Theology: H. P. OWEN. Religious Studies 13 (4):491-506.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. G. H. Hainton, Harold Silver & Robert Owen (1970). Robert Owen on Education. British Journal of Educational Studies 18 (1):98.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibnitz, Alexandre Louis Foucher de Careil & Octavius Freire Owen (1855). A Refutation Recently Discovered of Spinoza, with Intr. By the Count A. Foucher de Careil, Tr. By O.F. Owen.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. John Owen & Peter Toon (1971). The Correspondence of John Owen , with an Account of His Life and WorkThe Oxford Orations of Dr. John Owen. British Journal of Educational Studies 19 (3):352.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. H. P. Owen (1968). The Moral and Religious Philosophy of C. A. Campbell: H. P. OWEN. Religious Studies 3 (2):433-446.
    For over thirty years C. A. Campbell has made major contributions to both ethics and metaphysics. Since these do not correspond to the prevailing fashions in philosophy and theology they are in danger of being under-estimated, if not ignored. I hope to summarise and comment on them as impartially as possible. Inevitably I must be selective. In writing for this journal I have, naturally, chosen to stress those elements in Campbell's thought which are directly or indirectly relevant to religion. Even (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  91
    Bert van den Brink & David Owen (eds.) (2007). Recognition and Power: Axel Honneth and the Tradition of Critical Social Theory. Cambridge University Press.
    The topic of recognition has come to occupy a central place in debates in social and political theory. Developed by George Herbert Mead and Charles Taylor, it has been given expression in the program for Critical Theory developed by Axel Honneth in his book The Struggle for Recognition. Honneth's research program offers an empirically insightful way of reflecting on emancipatory struggles for greater justice and a powerful theoretical tool for generating a conception of justice and the good that enables the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  56
    David Owen (1999). Hume's Reason. Oxford University Press.
    This book explores Hume's account of reason and its role in human understanding, seen in the context of other notable accounts by philosophers of the early modern period. David Owen offers new interpretations of many of Hume's most famous arguments about induction, belief, scepticism, the passions, and moral distinctions.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   24 citations  
  16.  29
    David Owen (2007). Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morality. McGill-Queen's University Press/Acumen.
    Combining philosophical acuity, psychological insight and a remarkably powerful prose style, On the Genealogy of Morality is a dazzling and brilliantly incisive attack on European morality. David Owen situates the Genealogy in the context of the development of Nietzsche's philosophy and offers readers a sophisticated and nuanced analysis of this great text. He provides a lucid account of Nietzsche’s reasons for adopting a “genealogical” investigation of our moral values as well as a detailed analysis of the Genealogy itself. Highlighting (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  17. David Owen (2002). Humes Reason. Oxford University Press UK.
    'This is very well-trodden ground, but Owen succeeds in casting new light... Hume's Reason is proof of the value of careful elaboration.' -James Harris, Times Literary SupplementDavid Owen explores Hume's account of reason and its role in human understanding, seen in the context of other notable accounts by philosophers of the early modern period. Owen offers new interpretations of many of Hume's most famous arguments, about demonstration and the relation of ideas, induction, belief, and scepticism. Hume's Reason (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  18.  16
    David Owen (1994). Maturity and Modernity: Nietzsche, Weber, Foucault, and the Ambivalence of Reason. Routledge.
    Maturity and Modernity examines Nietzsche, Weber and Foucault as a distinct trajectory of critical thinking within modern thought which traces the emergence and development of genealogy in the form of imminent critique. David Owen clarifies the relationship between these thinkers and responds to Habermas' (and Dews') charge that these thinkers are nihilists and that their approach is philosophically incoherent and practically irresponsible by showing how genealogy as a practical activity is directed toward the achievements of human autonomy. The scope (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  19. G. E. R. Lloyd & G. E. L. Owen (eds.) (1978). Aristotle on Mind and the Senses: Proceedings of the Seventh Symposium Aristotelicum. Cambridge University Press.
    The Symposia Aristotelica were inaugurated at Oxford in 1957. They are conferences of select groups of Aristotelian scholars from the UK, USA and Europe, and are held every three years. In 1975 the meeting was held in Cambridge and was devoted to Aristotle's psychological treatises, the De anima and the Parva uaturalia. The members of the conference discussed some of the much debated problems of Aristotle's psychology and broached important new topics such as his ideas on imagination. Dr Lloyd and (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. G. E. R. Lloyd & G. E. L. Owen (eds.) (2007). Aristotle on Mind and the Senses. Cambridge University Press.
    The Symposia Aristotelica were inaugurated at Oxford in 1957. They are conferences of select groups of Aristotelian scholars from the UK, USA and Europe, and are held every three years. In 1975 the meeting was held in Cambridge and was devoted to Aristotle's psychological treatises, the De anima and the Parva uaturalia. The members of the conference discussed some of the much debated problems of Aristotle's psychology and broached important new topics such as his ideas on imagination. Dr Lloyd and (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. J. Judd Owen (2014). Making Religion Safe for Democracy: Transformation From Hobbes to Tocqueville. Cambridge University Press.
    Does the toleration of liberal democratic society mean that religious faiths are left substantively intact, so long as they respect the rights of others? Or do liberal principles presuppose a deeper transformation of religion? Does life in democratic society itself transform religion? In Making Religion Safe for Democracy, J. Judd Owen explores these questions by tracing a neglected strand of Enlightenment political thought that presents a surprisingly unified reinterpretation of Christianity by Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, and Thomas Jefferson. (...) then turns to Alexis de Tocqueville's analysis of the effects of democracy on religion in the early United States. Tocqueville finds a religion transformed by democracy in a way that bears a striking resemblance to what the Enlightenment thinkers sought, while offering a fundamentally different interpretation of what is at stake in that transformation. Making Religion Safe for Democracy offers a novel framework for understanding the ambiguous status of religion in modern democratic society. (shrink)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. David Owen (2014). Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morality. Routledge.
    A landmark work of western philosophy, "On the Genealogy of Morality" is a dazzling and brilliantly incisive attack on European "morality". Combining philosophical acuity with psychological insight in prose of remarkable rhetorical power, Nietzsche takes up the task of offering us reasons to engage in a re-evaluation of our values. In this book, David Owen offers a reflective and insightful analysis of Nietzsche's text. He provides an account of how Nietzsche comes to the project of the re-evaluation of values; (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Adrian M. Owen, Martin R. Coleman, Melanie Boly, Matthew H. Davis, Steven Laureys, Dietsje Jolles & John D. Pickard (2006). Detecting Awareness in the Conscious State. Science 313:1402.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   52 citations  
  24.  57
    Steven Laureys, Adrian M. Owen & Nicholas D. Schiff (2004). Brain Function in Coma, Vegetative State, and Related Disorders. Lancet Neurology 3:537-546.
  25.  49
    Adrian M. Owen, Martin R. Coleman, Melanie Boly, Matthew H. Davis, Steven Laureys, Dietsje Jolles & John D. Pickard (2007). Response to Comments on "Detecting Awareness in the Vegetative State". Science 315 (5816).
  26. Adrian M. Owen, Martin R. Coleman, Melanie Boly, Matthew H. Davis, Steven Laureys & John D. Pickard (2007). Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Detect Covert Awareness in the Vegetative State. Archives of Neurology 64 (8):1098-1102.
  27. David Owen (1987). Hume Versus Price on Miracles and Prior Probabilities: Testimony and the Bayesian Calculation. Philosophical Quarterly 37 (147):187-202.
    Hume’s celebrated argument concerning miracles, and an 18th century criticism of it put forward by Richard Price, is here interpreted in terms of the modern controversy over the base-rate fallacy. When considering to what degree we should trust a witness, should we or should we not take into account the prior probability of the event reported? The reliability of the witness (’Pr’(says e/e)) is distinguished from the credibility of the testimony (’Pr’(e/says e)), and it is argued that Hume, as a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  28.  12
    Adrian M. Owen, Martin R. Coleman, D. K. Menon, E. L. Berry, I. S. Johnsrude, J. M. Rodd, Matthew H. Davis & John D. Pickard (2006). Using a Hierarchical Approach to Investigate Residual Auditory Cognition in Persistent Vegetative State. In Steven Laureys (ed.), Boundaries of Consciousness. Elsevier.
  29.  16
    David Owen & Tracey Swift (2001). Introduction Social Accounting, Reporting and Auditing: Beyond the Rhetoric? Business Ethics 10 (1):4–8.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  30. Roberts B. Owen (1919). Teleology and Pragmatism: A Note. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 16 (18):487.
  31.  37
    David Owen (2002). Equality, Democracy, and Self-Respect: Reflections on Nietzsche's Agonal Perfectionism. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 24 (1):113-131.
  32.  19
    J. N. Findlay, T. D. Weldon, Stuart Hampshire, David Hamlyn, Stephen Toulmin, G. E. L. Owen, Bernard Mayo & Robert Thomson (1952). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 61 (242):276-295.
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  6
    Peter Owen (1973). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 13 (1):399-400.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  6
    Peter Owen (1976). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 16 (2):399-400.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  26
    David Owen (2003). The Contest of Enlightenment: An Essay on Critique and Genealogy. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 25 (1):35-57.
  36.  21
    Patricia R. Owen & Jennifer Zwahr-Castro (2007). Boundary Issues in Academia: Student Perceptions of Faculty - Student Boundary Crossings. Ethics and Behavior 17 (2):117 – 129.
    Boundary crossings in academia are rarely addressed by university policy despite the risk of problematic or unethical faculty - student interactions. This study contributes to an understanding of undergraduate college student perceptions of appropriateness of faculty - student nonsexual interactions by investigating the influence of gender and ethnicity on student judgments of the appropriateness of numerous hypothetical interactions. Overall, students deemed the majority of interactions as inappropriate. Female students judged a number of interactions as more inappropriate than did male students, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  16
    Austin Duncan-Jones, G. B. Keene, G. C. J. Midgley, Karl Britton, G. E. L. Owen, H. D. Lewis, Edna Daitz, J. L. Ackrill, Martha Kneale, Frederick C. Copleston, J. O. Urmson, J. P. Corbett & R. I. Aaron (1953). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 62 (246):259-288.
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  9
    Michael Owen (2006). Conflict and Convergence: The Ethics Review of Action Research. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 4 (1-4):61-75.
    The article is based on the author’s experience as an administrator of three primarily social science institutional review boards (IRBs) to which researchers presented research protocols that purported to be minimal risk studies of teacher practice where the “teacher–researcher” was the “research subject.” Recently, educational, social, and behavioral science researchers encounter many problems with regard to their methodologies and the oversight mandate of the IRBs. There is a divergence between the IRB’s role and assumed bio-clinical predisposition and the ability of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  10
    Robert Bishop Owen (1916). The Predicates Real and Unreal. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 13 (12):322-325.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  6
    E. T. Owen (1948). The Illusion of Thought. Journal of Philosophy 45 (19):505-511.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  2
    Peter Owen (1970). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 10 (4):399-400.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Valerie Owen (1966). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 6 (2):208-a-208.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Peter Owen (1967). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 7 (4):399-400.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Peter Owen (1972). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 12 (3):399-400.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Ian R. Owen (2007). On Justifying Psychotherapy: Essays for Psychotherapists on Phenomenology, Integration and Psychology. iUniverse.
  46.  37
    Ian R. Owen (2006). Psychotherapy and Phenomenology: On Freud, Husserl and Heidegger. iUniverse.
  47.  30
    André Casajus (2010). Another Characterization of the Owen Value Without the Additivity Axiom. Theory and Decision 69 (4):523-536.
    We provide another characterization of the Owen value for TU games with a coalition structure without the additivity axiom.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  48.  18
    A. Laruelle & F. Valenciano (2004). On The Meaning Of Owen–Banzhaf Coalitional Value In Voting Situations. Theory and Decision 56 (1-2):113-123.
    In this paper we discuss the meaning of Owen's coalitional extension of the Banzhaf index in the context of voting situations. It is discussed the possibility of accommodating this index within the following model: in order to evaluate the likelihood of a voter to be crucial in making a decision by means of a voting rule a second input (apart from the rule itself) is necessary: an estimate of the probability of different vote configurations. It is shown how (...)'s coalitional extension can be seen as three different normative variations of this model. (shrink)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  49.  5
    Giovanni Camardi (2001). Richard Owen, Morphology and Evolution. Journal of the History of Biology 34 (3):481 - 515.
    Richard Owen has been condemned by Darwinians as an anti-evolutionist and an essentialist. In recent years he has been the object of a revisionist analysis intended to uncover evolutionary elements in his scientific enterprise. In this paper I will examine Owen's evolutionary hypothesis and its connections with von Baer's idea of divergent development. To give appropriate importance to Owen's evolutionism is the first condition to develop an up-to-date understanding of his scientific enterprise, that is to disentagle (...)'s contribution to the modernization of typology and morphology. I will argue that Owen's Platonic essentialism is rhetorical and incongruous. On the contrary, an interpretation of the archetype based on Aristotle's biological works makes possible a new conception of type, based on a homeostatic mechanism of stability. The renewal of morphology hinges on homological correspondences and a homeostatic process is also the origin of serial and special homology. I will argue that special homology shows an evolutionary orientation insofar as it is a typically inter-specific character while serial homology is determined through an elementary usage of the categories of developmental morphology. (shrink)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  50.  20
    Shaun Young (2007). Avoiding the Unavoidable? Judith Shklar's Unwilling Search for an Overlapping Consensus. Res Publica 13 (3):231-253.
    No less an authority than John Rawls identified Judith Shklar as a ‘political’ liberal. However, though their respective conceptions of political liberalism are similar in a number of important respects, Shklar emphasizes that her vision differs notably from that of Rawls. In particular, she explicitly eschews Rawls’s focus on establishing and sustaining an overlapping consensus, arguing that his belief in the possibility of securing such a consensus is naïve and, indeed, dangerous insofar as it embodies an obvious disregard for (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 1000