10 found
Order:
  1.  13
    Feminisms.Sandra Kemp & Judith Squires (eds.) - 1997 - Oxford University Press.
    Spanning nearly two decades, from 1980 to 1996, this Reader investigates the debates which have best characterized feminist theory. Including such articles as Pornography and Fantasy, The Body and Cinema, Nature as Female, and A Manifesto for Cyborgs, the extracts examine thoughts on sexualtiy as a domain of exploration, the visual representation of women, what being a feminist means, and why feminists are increasingly involved in political struggles to negotiate the context and meaning of technological development. With writings by bell (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  2.  1
    Discourses Surrounding Prostitution Policies in the UK.Judith Squires & Johanna Kantola - 2004 - European Journal of Women's Studies 11 (1):77-101.
    This article examines discourses invoked in the UK debates about prostitution and trafficking in women. The authors suggest that there are three striking features about these discourses: the absence of the sex work discourse, the dominance of the public nuisance discourse in relation to kerb-crawling and the dominance of moral order discourses in relation to trafficking. At a time when the UK is about to revise its sex laws, it is important to consider the discourses that frame prostitution policies in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  3.  60
    Beyond the Public/Private Dichotomy: Relational Space and Sexual Inequalities.Chris Armstrong & Judith Squires - 2002 - Contemporary Political Theory 1 (3):261-283.
    The public/private dichotomy has long been the object of considerable attention for feminists. We argue that, by focusing their attention on a divide which has declined in importance, feminists may fail to keep up with the current means by which sexual inequalities are perpetuated. Furthermore, by concentrating on this divide feminists risk reproducing such dichotomous thinking in their own work, discursively perpetuating that which they had initially hoped to displace. We begin by surveying feminist critiques of the public/private dichotomy, consider (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  23
    Contesting Citizenship: Comparative Analyses.Birte Siim & Judith Squires - 2007 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 10 (4):403-416.
  5.  18
    Negotiating Equality and Diversity in Britain: Towards a Differentiated Citizenship?Judith Squires - 2007 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 10 (4):531-559.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Book Review: Troubled Pleasures: Writing on Politics, Gender and Hedonism. [REVIEW]Judith Squires - 1992 - Feminist Review 40 (1):118-120.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Dimensions of Radical Democracy. [REVIEW]Judith Squires - 1993 - Feminist Review 44 (1):120-123.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  34
    Hugh Mercer Curtler: Rediscovering Values: Coming to Terms with Postmodernism. [REVIEW]Judith Squires - 2000 - Journal of Value Inquiry 34 (4):579-583.
  9. Principled Positions: Postmodernism and the Rediscovery of Value.Judith Squires (ed.) - 1993 - Lawrence & Wishart.
    The deconstruction of all 'principled positions' creates a value vacuum which, in turn, leads to a state of ethical and political paralysis. The contributors to Principled Positions ponder these dilemmas and try to build bridges between the modernist absolutes of truth, value and justice and the anti-totalising spirit of postmodernism.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  10. Representing Groups, Deconstructing Identities.Judith Squires - 2001 - Feminist Theory 2 (1):7-27.
    This article explores feminist arguments for group representation and suggests that there are three distinct theoretical frameworks on which these arguments are based: an equality perspective leading to a strategy of inclusion, a difference perspective leading to a strategy of reversal and a diversity perspective leading to a strategy of displacement. I focus in particular on the defence of group representation developed by Iris Marion Young, because this is made from a diversity perspective, which offers the most theoretically satisfying account (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation