52 found
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  1.  62
    Managing Incidental Findings in Human Subjects Research: Analysis and Recommendations.Susan M. Wolf, Frances P. Lawrenz, Charles A. Nelson, Jeffrey P. Kahn, Mildred K. Cho, Ellen Wright Clayton, Joel G. Fletcher, Michael K. Georgieff, Dale Hammerschmidt, Kathy Hudson, Judy Illes, Vivek Kapur, Moira A. Keane, Barbara A. Koenig, Bonnie S. LeRoy, Elizabeth G. McFarland, Jordan Paradise, Lisa S. Parker, Sharon F. Terry, Brian Van Ness & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):219-248.
    No consensus yet exists on how to handle incidental fnd-ings in human subjects research. Yet empirical studies document IFs in a wide range of research studies, where IFs are fndings beyond the aims of the study that are of potential health or reproductive importance to the individual research participant. This paper reports recommendations of a two-year project group funded by NIH to study how to manage IFs in genetic and genomic research, as well as imaging research. We conclude that researchers (...)
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  2.  90
    Imaging or Imagining? A Neuroethics Challenge Informed by Genetics.Judy Illes & Eric Racine - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (2):5 – 18.
    From a twenty-first century partnership between bioethics and neuroscience, the modern field of neuroethics is emerging, and technologies enabling functional neuroimaging with unprecedented sensitivity have brought new ethical, social and legal issues to the forefront. Some issues, akin to those surrounding modern genetics, raise critical questions regarding prediction of disease, privacy and identity. However, with new and still-evolving insights into our neurobiology and previously unquantifiable features of profoundly personal behaviors such as social attitude, value and moral agency, the difficulty of (...)
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  3.  52
    Oxford Handbook of Neuroethics.Judy Illes & Barbara J. Sahakian (eds.) - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    The handbook contains more than 50 chapters by leaders from around the world and a broad range of sectors of academia and clinical practice spanning the ...
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  4.  26
    Neuroethics: Defining the Issues in Theory, Practice, and Policy.Judy Illes (ed.) - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    Recent advances in the brain sciences have dramatically improved our understanding of brain function. As we find out more and more about what makes us tick, we must stop and consider the ethical implications of this new found knowledge. This ground-breaking book on the emerging field of neuroethics answers many pertinent questions, such as: What makes monitoring and manipulating the human brain so ethically challenging? Will having a new biology of the brain through imaging make us less responsible for our (...)
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  5. “Currents of Hope”: Neurostimulation Techniques in U.S. And U.K. Print Media.Eric Racine, Sarah Waldman, Nicole Palmour, David Risse & Judy Illes - 2007 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (3):312-316.
    The application of neurostimulation techniques such as deep brain stimulation —often called a brain pacemaker for neurological conditions like Parkinson's disease —has generated “currents of hope.” Building on this hope, there is significant interest in applying neurostimulation to psychiatric disorders such as major depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder. These emerging neurosurgical practices raise a number of important ethical and social questions in matters of resource allocation, informed consent for vulnerable populations, and commercialization of research.
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  6.  12
    A Cross-Cultural Neuroethics View on the Language of Disability.Judy Illes & Hayami Lou - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (2):75-84.
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  7.  87
    Neuroimaging and Disorders of Consciousness: Envisioning an Ethical Research Agenda.Joseph J. Fins, Judy Illes, James L. Bernat, Joy Hirsch, Steven Laureys & Emily Murphy - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (9):3 – 12.
    The application of neuroimaging technology to the study of the injured brain has transformed how neuroscientists understand disorders of consciousness, such as the vegetative and minimally conscious states, and deepened our understanding of mechanisms of recovery. This scientific progress, and its potential clinical translation, provides an opportunity for ethical reflection. It was against this scientific backdrop that we convened a conference of leading investigators in neuroimaging, disorders of consciousness and neuroethics. Our goal was to develop an ethical frame to move (...)
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  8.  8
    Ethics, Ethicists, and Professional Organizations in the Neurological Sciences.Tabitha Moses & Judy Illes - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 8 (1):3-11.
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  9.  58
    The International Dimensions of Neuroethics.Sofia Lombera & Judy Illes - 2009 - Developing World Bioethics 9 (2):57-64.
    Neuroethics, in its modern form, investigates the impact of brain science in four basic dimensions: the self, social policy, practice and discourse. In this study, we analyzed a set of 461 peer-reviewed articles with neuroethics content, published by authors from 32 countries. We analyzed the data for: (1) trends in the development of international neuroethics over time, and (2) how challenges at the intersection of ethics and neuroscience are viewed in countries that are considered developed by International Monetary Fund (IMF) (...)
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  10. Neuroethics.Eric Racine & Judy Illes - 2008 - In Peter A. Singer & A. M. Viens (eds.), The Cambridge Textbook of Bioethics. Cambridge University Press. pp. 495--503.
     
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  11. “This is Why You’Ve Been Suffering”: Reflections of Providers on Neuroimaging in Mental Health Care.Emily Borgelt, Daniel Z. Buchman & Judy Illes - 2011 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (1):15-25.
    Mental health care providers increasingly confront challenges posed by the introduction of new neurotechnology into the clinic, but little is known about the impact of such capabilities on practice patterns and relationships with patients. To address this important gap, we sought providers’ perspectives on the potential clinical translation of functional neuroimaging for prediction and diagnosis of mental illness. We conducted 32 semi-structured telephone interviews with mental health care providers representing psychiatry, psychology, family medicine, and allied mental health. Our results suggest (...)
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  12.  8
    Negotiating the Relationship Between Addiction, Ethics, and Brain Science.Daniel Z. Buchman, Wayne Skinner & Judy Illes - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 1 (1):36-45.
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  13.  97
    ELSI Priorities for Brain Imaging.Judy Illes, Raymond De Vries, Mildred K. Cho & Pam Schraedley-Desmond - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (2):W24-W31.
    As one of the most compelling technologies for imaging the brain, functional MRI (fMRI) produces measurements and persuasive pictures of research subjects making cognitive judgments and even reasoning through difficult moral decisions. Even after centuries of studying the link between brain and behavior, this capability presents a number of novel significant questions. For example, what are the implications of biologizing human experience? How might neuroimaging disrupt the mysteries of human nature, spirituality, and personal identity? Rather than waiting for an ethical (...)
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  14.  12
    Fetal Repair of Open Neural Tube Defects: Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues.Julia A. E. Radic, Judy Illes & Patrick J. Mcdonald - 2019 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 28 (3):476-487.
    :Open neural tube defects or myelomeningoceles are a common congenital condition caused by failure of closure of the neural tube early in gestation, leading to a number of neurologic sequelae including paralysis, hindbrain herniation, hydrocephalus and neurogenic bowel and bladder dysfunction. Traditionally, the condition was treated by closure of the defect postnatally but a recently completed randomized controlled trial of prenatal versus postnatal closure demonstrated improved neurologic outcomes in the prenatal closure group. Fetal surgery, or more precisely maternal-fetal surgery, raises (...)
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  15.  18
    Ethical and Clinical Considerations at the Intersection of Functional Neuroimaging and Disorders of Consciousness.Adrian C. Byram, Grace Lee, Adrian M. Owen, Urs Ribary, A. Jon Stoessl, Andrea Townson & Judy Illes - 2016 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (4):613-622.
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  16.  29
    Internet Marketing of Neuroproducts: New Practices and Healthcare Policy Challenges.Eric Racine, Hz Adriaan van Der Loos & Judy Illes - 2007 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (2):181-194.
    Direct-to-consumer advertising of healthcare products refers to a variety of marketing practices based on a combination of information and promotion strategies directed at consumers through different media such as radio and television broadcasts, newspaper and magazine ads, and, more recently, through the Internet. The principal form of marketing used by the pharmaceutical industry is the distribution of free samples to physicians but DTCA is an increasing part of global promotional spending for prescription drugs. Latest estimates suggest that DTCA now represents (...)
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  17.  18
    Bridging Philosophical and Practical Implications of Incidental Findings in Brain Research.Judy Illes & Vivian Nora Chin - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):298-304.
    Empirical studies and ethical-legal analyses have demonstrated that incidental fndings in the brain, most commonly vascular in origin, must be addressed in the current era of imaging research. The challenges, however, are substantial. The discovery and management of incidental fndings vary, at minimum, by institutional setting, professional background of investigators, and the inherent diferences between research and clinical protocols. In the context of human subjects protections, the challenges of disclosure of unexpected and potentially meaningful clinical information concern privacy and confdentiality, (...)
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  18.  4
    Bridging Philosophical and Practical Implications of Incidental Findings in Brain Research.Judy Illes & Vivian Nora Chin - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):298-304.
    In Phillip Kerr’s 1994 spellbinding novel A Philosophical Investigation, the medical test to which the protagonist refers is a functional brain scan based on positron emission tomography. It is used to run large studies of male and female brains and, following a lead suggested by animal studies, has been used to identify rare cases of human male subjects who lack the ventral medial nucleus. This nucleus, in the experiment, is hypothesized to inhibit the activity of the sexually dimorphic nucleus, a (...)
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  19.  8
    Pragmatic Convergence and the Epistemology of an Adolescent Neuroethics.Joseph J. Fins & Judy Illes - 2018 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 27 (4):554-557.
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  20.  68
    Advancing Neuroregenerative Medicine: A Call for Expanded Collaboration Between Scientists and Ethicists.Jocelyn Grunwell, Judy Illes & Katrina Karkazis - 2008 - Neuroethics 2 (1):13-20.
    To date, ethics discussions about stem cell research overwhelmingly have centered on the morality and acceptability of using human embryonic stem cells. Governments in many jurisdictions have now answered these “first-level questions” and many have now begun to address ethical issues related to the donation of cells, gametes, or embryos for research. In this commentary, we move beyond these ethical concerns to discuss new themes that scientists on the forefront of NRM development anticipate, providing a preliminary framework for further discussion (...)
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  21.  27
    Managing Incidental Findings: Lessons From Neuroimaging.Emily Borgelt, James A. Anderson & Judy Illes - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (2):46 - 47.
  22.  1
    An Ethicolegal Analysis of Involuntary Treatment for Opioid Use Disorders.Farhad R. Udwadia & Judy Illes - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (4):735-740.
    Supply-side interventions such as prescription drug monitoring programs, “pill mill” laws, and dispensing limits have done little to quell the burgeoning opioid crisis. An increasingly popular demand-side alternative to these measures – now adopted by 38 jurisdictions in the USA and 7 provinces in Canada — is court-mandated involuntary commitment and treatment. In Massachusetts, for example, Part I, Chapter 123, Section 35 of the state's General Laws allows physicians, spouses, relatives, and police officers to petition a court to involuntarily commit (...)
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  23. A Picture is Worth 1000 Words, but Which 1000?Judy Illes, Eric Racine & Kirschen & P. Matthew - 2005 - In Neuroethics: Defining the Issues in Theory, Practice, and Policy. Oxford University Press.
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  24.  10
    Environmental Neuroethics: Bridging Environmental Ethics and Mental Health.Adam J. Shriver, Laura Y. Cabrera & Judy Illes - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (9):26-27.
  25.  7
    Neurologisms.Judy Illes - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (9):1-1.
  26.  17
    Ethical Challenges in Contemporary FASD Research and Practice.Nina di Pietro, Jantina de Vries, Angelina Paolozza, Dorothy Reid, James N. Reynolds, Amy Salmon, Marsha Wilson, Dan J. Stein & Judy Illes - 2016 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (4):726-732.
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  27.  12
    Closing Gaps: Strength-Based Approaches to Research with Aboriginal Children with Neurodevelopmental Disorders.Nina Di Pietro & Judy Illes - 2016 - Neuroethics 9 (3):243-252.
    There is substantial literature on fetal alcohol spectrum disorder research involving Aboriginal children, but little related literature on other common neurodevelopmental conditions such as autism spectrum disorder or cerebral palsy for this population. As part of our work in cross-cultural neuroethics, we examined this phenomenon as a case study in Canada. We conducted semi-structured interviews with health researchers working on the frontline with First Nation communities to obtain perspectives about: reasons for the lack of ASD and CP research within the (...)
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  28.  38
    Neuroethics, Confidentiality, and a Cultural Imperative in Early Onset Alzheimer Disease: A Case Study with a First Nation Population.Shaun Stevenson, B. L. Beattie, Richard Vedan, Emily Dwosh, Lindsey Bruce & Judy Illes - 2013 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 8:15.
    The meaningful consideration of cultural practices, values and beliefs is a necessary component in the effective translation of advancements in neuroscience to clinical practice and public discourse. Society’s immense investment in biomedical science and technology, in conjunction with an increasingly diverse socio-cultural landscape, necessitates the study of how potential discoveries in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease are perceived and utilized across cultures. Building on the work of neuroscientists, ethicists and philosophers, we argue that the growing field of neuroethics provides (...)
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  29.  18
    The Gray Zones of Privatized Imaging.Patricia W. Lau & Judy Illes - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (4):21-22.
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  30.  9
    In Pursuit of “Informed Hope” in the Stem Cell Discourse.Joanne Reimer, Emily Borgelt & Judy Illes - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (5):31-32.
  31.  4
    Neuroimaging and Mental Health: Drowning in a Sea of Acrimony.James A. Anderson & Judy Illes - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 3 (4):42-43.
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  32.  8
    Integration Under Negotiation.Daniel Z. Buchman, Wayne Skinner & Judy Illes - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 1 (3):W1-W2.
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  33.  37
    Lights, Camera, Inaction? Neuroimaging and Disorders of Consciousness.Joseph J. Fins & Judy Illes - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (9):W1 – W3.
    Without exaggeration, it could be said that we are entering a golden age of neuroscience. Informed by recent developments in neuroimaging that allow us to peer into the working brain at both a structural and functional level, neuroscientists are beginning to untangle mechanisms of recovery after brain injury and grapple with age-old questions about brain and mind and their correlates neural mechanisms and consciousness. Neuroimaging, coupled with new diagnostic categories and assessment scales are helping us develop a new diagnostic nosology (...)
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  34.  20
    Not Forgetting Forgetting.Judy Illes - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (9):1 – 2.
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  35. Practicioners' Views on Neuroimaging : Mental Health, Patient Consent, and Choice.Emily Borgelt, Daniel Buchman & Judy Illes - 2012 - In Sarah Richmond, Geraint Rees & Sarah J. L. Edwards (eds.), I Know What You're Thinking: Brain Imaging and Mental Privacy. Oxford University Press.
     
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  36.  7
    International Legal Approaches to Neurosurgery for Psychiatric Disorders.Jennifer A. Chandler, Laura Y. Cabrera, Paresh Doshi, Shirley Fecteau, Joseph J. Fins, Salvador Guinjoan, Clement Hamani, Karen Herrera-Ferrá, C. Michael Honey, Judy Illes, Brian H. Kopell, Nir Lipsman, Patrick J. McDonald, Helen S. Mayberg, Roland Nadler, Bart Nuttin, Albino J. Oliveira-Maia, Cristian Rangel, Raphael Ribeiro, Arleen Salles & Hemmings Wu - 2021 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 14.
    Neurosurgery for psychiatric disorders, also sometimes referred to as psychosurgery, is rapidly evolving, with new techniques and indications being investigated actively. Many within the field have suggested that some form of guidelines or regulations are needed to help ensure that a promising field develops safely. Multiple countries have enacted specific laws regulating NPD. This article reviews NPD-specific laws drawn from North and South America, Asia and Europe, in order to identify the typical form and contents of these laws and to (...)
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  37.  41
    Treatments and Services for Neurodevelopmental Disorders on Advocacy Websites: Information or Evaluation? [REVIEW]Nina C. Di Pietro, Louise Whiteley & Judy Illes - 2012 - Neuroethics 5 (2):197-209.
    The Internet has quickly gained popularity as a major source of health-related information, but its impact is unclear. Here, we investigate the extent to which advocacy websites for three neurodevelopmental disorders—cerebral palsy (CP), autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD)—inform stakeholders about treatment options, and discuss the ethical challenges inherent in providing such information online. We identified major advocacy websites for each disorder and assessed website accountability, the number, attributes, and accessibility of treatments described, and the valence (...)
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  38.  13
    Rural and Remote Communities: Unique Ethical Issues in the COVID-19 Pandemic.Cheryl Erwin, Julie Aultman, Tom Harter, Judy Illes & Rabbi Claudio J. Kogan - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (7):117-120.
    Volume 20, Issue 7, July 2020, Page 117-120.
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  39. Participants of the Working Meeting on Ethics, Neuroimaging and Limited States of Consciousness. Neuroimaging and Disorders of Consciousness: Envisioning an Ethical Research Agenda.Joseph J. Fins, Judy Illes, James L. Bernat, Joy Hirsch, Steven Laureys & Emily Murphy - 2008 - Am J Bioethics 8 (9):3-12.
     
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  40.  2
    Invasive Experimental Brain Surgery for Dementia: Ethical Shifts in Clinical Research Practices?Frederic Gilbert, John Noel M. Viaña, Merlin Bittlinger, Ian Stevens, Maree Farrow, James Vickers, Susan Dodds & Judy Illes - forthcoming - Bioethics.
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  41.  17
    Chimeras of Nurture.Judy Illes & Emily R. Murphy - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (5):1 – 2.
  42.  5
    Deep Brain Stimulation: Paradoxes and a Plea.Judy Illes - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 3 (1):65-70.
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  43.  6
    Ethically Problematic Medical Device Representation.Judy Illes, Patrick J. McDonald, Chloe Lau, Viorica M. Hrincu & Mary B. Connolly - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (8):5-6.
    Volume 20, Issue 8, August 2020, Page 5-6.
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  44.  2
    Head Transplants: Ghoulish Takes on New Definition.Judy Illes & Patrick J. McDonald - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 8 (4):211-212.
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  45.  10
    Ipsa Scientia Potestas Est (Knowledge is Power).Judy Illes - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):1 – 2.
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  46.  3
    Neuroethics at 10, and Counting.Judy Illes & Paul Root Wolpe - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 4 (1):1-3.
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  47. Neuroethics: Defining the Issues in Theory, Practice, and Policy.Judy Illes (ed.) - 2005 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Recent advances in the brain sciences have dramatically improved our understanding of brain function. As we find out more and more about what makes us tick, we must stop and consider the ethical implications of this new found knowledge. Will having a new biology of the brain through imaging make us less responsible for our behavior and lose our free will? Should certain brain scan studies be disallowed on the basis of moral grounds? Why is the media so interested in (...)
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  48. Oxford Handbook of Neuroethics.Judy Illes & Barbara J. Sahakian (eds.) - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    A landmark in the scientific literature, the Oxford Handbook of Neuroethics presents a pioneering review of a topic central to the biosciences. It breaks new ground in bringing together leading neuroscientists, philosophers, and lawyers to tackle some of the most significant ethical issues that face us now and will continue to do so.
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  49. Guest Editorial: Neuroethics—From Neurotechnology to Healthcare.Judy Illes & Eric Racine - 2007 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (2):125-128.
    In proportion to other serious illnesses, diseases of the brain and mind represent the greatest—and still increasing—public health burden that Western societies are facing. Consequently, scientists, governments, advocacy groups, and public health authorities are committed to research to tackle the causes and consequences of neurological and psychiatric diseases and to find cures for them. As neuroscience research progresses, ethicists and neuroscientists face numerous ethical challenges to the integration of frontier application of research—neurotechnology—with the delivery of high-quality healthcare. In this special (...)
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  50.  2
    Never Say Never: Limitations of Neuroimaging for Communicating Decisions After Brain Injury.Grace Lee & Judy Illes - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 4 (1):58-58.
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