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  1.  34
    Apologies and Transformational Leadership.Sean Tucker, Nick Turner, Julian Barling, Erin M. Reid & Cecilia Elving - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 63 (2):195-207.
    This empirical investigation showed that contrary to the popular notion that apologies signify weakness, the victims of mistakes made by leaders consistently perceived leaders who apologized as more transformational than those who did not apologize. In a field experiment (Study 1), male referees who were perceived as having apologized for mistakes made officiating hockey games were rated by male coaches (n = 93) as more transformational than when no apology was made. Studies 2 (n = 50) and 3 (n = (...)
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  2. Pseudo-Transformational Leadership: Towards the Development and Test of a Model.Julian Barling, Amy Christie & Nick Turner - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (4):851-861.
    We develop and test a model of pseudo-transformational leadership. Pseudo-transformational leadership is manifested by a particular combination of transformational leadership behaviors, and is differentiated from both transformational leadership and laissez-faire -leadership. Survey data from senior managers show differential outcomes of transformational, pseudo-transformational, and laissez-faire leadership. Possible extensions of the theoretical model and directions for future research are offered.
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  3.  8
    Leader Apologies and Employee and Leader Well-Being.Alyson Byrne, Julian Barling & Kathryne E. Dupré - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 121 (1):91-106.
    Regardless of leaders’ efforts to do the right thing and meet performance expectations, they make mistakes, with possible ramifications for followers’ and leaders’ well-being. Some leaders will apologize following transgressions, which may have positive implications for their followers’ and their own well-being, contingent upon the nature and severity of the transgressions. We examine these relationships in two separate studies. In Study 1, leader apologies had a positive relationship with followers’ psychological well-being and emotional health, and these relationships were moderated by (...)
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  4.  44
    Transformational Leadership and Leaders' Mode of Care Reasoning.Sheldene Simola, Julian Barling & Nick Turner - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 108 (2):229-237.
    Previous research on the moral foundations of transformational leadership has focused primarily on stage of justice reasoning; this study focuses on developmental mode of care reasoning. Multilevel regression analyses were conducted on data coded from interviews with a sample of Canadian public sector managers ( N = 58) and survey responses from their subordinates ( N = 119). Results indicated that managers’ developmental mode of care reasoning significantly and positively predicted subordinates’ reports of transformational (but not transactional) leadership, with significant (...)
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  5.  12
    Odd Jobs, Bad Habits, and Ethical Implications: Smoking-Related Outcomes of Children’s Early Employment Intensity.Amy L. Bergenwall, E. Kevin Kelloway & Julian Barling - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 122 (2):269-282.
    Considerable interest has long existed in two separate phenomena of considerable social interest, namely children’s early exposure to employment outside of any organizational, legislative, or collective bargaining protection, and teenage smoking. We used data from a large national survey to address possible direct and indirect links between children’s early employment intensity and smoking because of significant long-term implications of the link between work and well-being in a vulnerable population. Fifth to ninth grade children’s informal employment intensity was related to both (...)
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  6.  27
    De-Marketing Tobacco Through Price Changes and Consumer Attempts Quit Smoking.Michelle Inness, Julian Barling, Keith Rogers & Nick Turner - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 77 (4):405-416.
    Using panel data from three Canadian provinces, this article examines the relationship between the de-marketing of tobacco products through provincial-level price increases and consumers’ attempts to quit smoking as measured by the uptake of tobacco replacement therapies. We ground our hypotheses in the rational addiction model and the theory of planned behavior. Our analyses suggest a positive, one-month lagged effect of a price increase of tobacco products on the uptake of tobacco replacement therapies. This effect dissipates 3 months later, suggesting (...)
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