8 found
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  1.  78
    True Happiness: The Role of Morality in the Folk Concept of Happiness.Jonathan Phillips, Christian Mott, Julian De Freitas, June Gruber & Joshua Knobe - forthcoming - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General.
    Recent scientific research has settled on a purely descriptive definition of happiness that is focused solely on agents’ psychological states (high positive affect, low negative affect, high life satisfaction). In contrast to this understanding, recent research has suggested that the ordinary concept of happiness is also sensitive to the moral value of agents’ lives. Five studies systematically investigate and explain the impact of morality on ordinary assessments of happiness. Study 1 demonstrates that moral judgments influence assessments of happiness not only (...)
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  2. Normative Judgments and Individual Essence.Julian De Freitas, Kevin P. Tobia, George E. Newman & Joshua Knobe - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (1).
    A growing body of research has examined how people judge the persistence of identity over time—that is, how they decide that a particular individual is the same entity from one time to the next. While a great deal of progress has been made in understanding the types of features that people typically consider when making such judgments, to date, existing work has not explored how these judgments may be shaped by normative considerations. The present studies demonstrate that normative beliefs do (...)
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  3.  99
    Beliefs About the True Self Explain Asymmetries Based on Moral Judgment.George E. Newman, Julian De Freitas & Joshua Knobe - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (1):96-125.
    Past research has identified a number of asymmetries based on moral judgments. Beliefs about what a person values, whether a person is happy, whether a person has shown weakness of will, and whether a person deserves praise or blame seem to depend critically on whether participants themselves find the agent's behavior to be morally good or bad. To date, however, the origins of these asymmetries remain unknown. The present studies examine whether beliefs about an agent's “true self” explain these observed (...)
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  4.  6
    Consistent Belief in a Good True Self in Misanthropes and Three Interdependent Cultures.Julian De Freitas, Hagop Sarkissian, George Newman, Igor Grossmann, Felipe De Brigard, Andres Luco & Joshua Knobe - forthcoming - Cognitive Science.
    People sometimes explain behavior by appealing to an essentialist concept of the self, often referred to as the true self. Existing studies suggest that people tend to believe that the true self is morally virtuous, i.e., that, deep inside, every person is motivated to behave in morally good ways. Is this belief particular to individuals with optimistic beliefs or people from Western cultures, or does it reflect a widely held cognitive bias in how people understand the self? To address this (...)
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  5. Attentional Rhythm: A Temporal Analogue of Object-Based Attention.Julian De Freitas, Brandon M. Liverence & Brian J. Scholl - 2014 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 143 (1):71-76.
  6.  1
    Ownership Dilemmas: The Case of Finders Versus Landowners.Peter DeScioli, Rachel Karpoff & Julian De Freitas - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (2).
    People sometimes disagree about who owns which objects, and these ownership dilemmas can lead to costly disputes. We investigate the cognitive mechanisms underlying people's judgments about finder versus landowner cases, in which a person finds an object on someone else's land. We test psychological hypotheses motivated directly by three major principles that govern these cases in the law. The results show that people are more likely to favor the finder when the object is in a public space compared to a (...)
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  7.  1
    Recursive Mentalizing and Common Knowledge in the Bystander Effect.Kyle A. Thomas, Julian De Freitas, Peter DeScioli & Steven Pinker - 2016 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 145 (5):621-629.
  8.  2
    Response: Clinical Wisdom and Evidence-Based Medicine Are Complementary.Julian De Freitas, Omar S. Haque, Abilash A. Gopal & Harold J. Bursztajn - 2012 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 23 (1):28.
    A long-debated question in the philosophy of health, and contingent disciplines, is the extent to which wise clinical practice is, or could be, compatible with empirically validated medicine . Here we respond to Baum-Baicker and Sisti, who not only suggest that these two types of knowledge are divided due to their differing sources, but also that EBM can sometimes even hurt wise clinical practice. We argue that the distinction between EBM and clinical wisdom is poorly defined, unsupported by the methodology (...)
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