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  1.  29
    The Naïve Utility Calculus: Computational Principles Underlying Commonsense Psychology.Julian Jara-Ettinger, Hyowon Gweon, Laura E. Schulz & Joshua B. Tenenbaum - 2016 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 20 (8):589-604.
  2.  13
    Children’s Understanding of the Costs and Rewards Underlying Rational Action.Julian Jara-Ettinger, Hyowon Gweon, Joshua B. Tenenbaum & Laura E. Schulz - 2015 - Cognition 140:14-23.
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  3.  30
    What Comes to Mind?Adam Bear, Samantha Bensinger, Julian Jara-Ettinger, Joshua Knobe & Fiery Cushman - 2020 - Cognition 194:104057.
    When solving problems, like making predictions or choices, people often “sample” possibilities into mind. Here, we consider whether there is structure to the kinds of thoughts people sample by default—that is, without an explicit goal. Across three experiments we found that what comes to mind by default are samples from a probability distribution that combines what people think is likely and what they think is good. Experiment 1 found that the first quantities that come to mind for everyday behaviors and (...)
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  4.  7
    The Naïve Utility Calculus: Computational Principles Underlying Commonsense Psychology.Julian Jara-Ettinger, Hyowon Gweon, Laura E. Schulz & Joshua B. Tenenbaum - 2016 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 20 (10):785.
  5.  4
    Communication Efficiency of Color Naming Across Languages Provides a New Framework for the Evolution of Color Terms.Bevil R. Conway, Sivalogeswaran Ratnasingam, Julian Jara-Ettinger, Richard Futrell & Edward Gibson - 2020 - Cognition 195:104086.
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  6.  20
    Children Understand That Agents Maximize Expected Utilities.Julian Jara-Ettinger, Sammy Floyd, Joshua B. Tenenbaum & Laura E. Schulz - 2017 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 146 (11):1574-1585.
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  7.  17
    Sensitivity to the Sampling Process Emerges From the Principle of Efficiency.Julian Jara-Ettinger, Felix Sun, Laura Schulz & Joshua B. Tenenbaum - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (S1):270-286.
    Humans can seamlessly infer other people's preferences, based on what they do. Broadly, two types of accounts have been proposed to explain different aspects of this ability. The first account focuses on spatial information: Agents' efficient navigation in space reveals what they like. The second account focuses on statistical information: Uncommon choices reveal stronger preferences. Together, these two lines of research suggest that we have two distinct capacities for inferring preferences. Here we propose that this is not the case, and (...)
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