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Julie R. Klein [13]Julie Rachel Klein [1]
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Julie R. Klein
Villanova University
  1. "Something of It Remains": Spinoza and Gersonides on Intellectual Eternity.Julie R. Klein - 2014 - In Steven M. Nadler (ed.), Spinoza and Jewish Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. pp. 177-203.
  2.  61
    Spinoza’s Debt to Gersonides.Julie R. Klein - 2003 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 24 (1):19-43.
    In proposition 7 of the second part of the Ethics, Spinoza famously contends that the “order and connection of things is the same as the order and connection of ideas.” On this basis, Spinoza argues in the scholium that thought and extension are different ways of conceiving one and the same substance: “the thinking substance and the extended substance are one and the same substance, which is now comprehended under this attribute, now under that”. Less famously, in the same scholium, (...)
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  3.  67
    Dreaming with Open Eyes: Cartesian Dreams, Spinozan Analyses.Julie R. Klein - 2003 - Idealistic Studies 33 (2/3):141-159.
    "Dreaming with open eyes" is a tagline for Spinoza's critique of Descartes; the dreams in question are principally those of volition and the active imagination. In this article, I compare the Cartesian theory of imagination as an active, but not fully rational, power of the mind and the Cartesian account of the volitional self to Spinoza's views. Descartes's own dreams and theories of dreaming are the focus of the first part of the article. Thereafter I examine Spinoza's critique of Descartes (...)
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  4. Philosophizing Historically/Historicizing Philosophy: Some Spinozistic Reflections.Julie R. Klein - 2013 - In Mogens Laerke, Justin E. H. Smith & Eric Schliesser (eds.), Philosophy and Its History. Aims and Methods in the Study of Early Modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 134-158.
     
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  5. "By Eternity I Understand": Eternity According to Spinoza.Julie R. Klein - 2002 - Iyyun, The Jerusalem Philosophical Quarterly 51 (July):295-324.
  6.  5
    The Ethics of Joy: Spinoza on the Empowered Life by Andrew Youpa.Julie R. Klein - 2022 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 60 (1):162-163.
    The Ethics of Joy offers reconstructive argument, careful engagement with select literature, and a big-picture presentation of Spinoza’s view of the well-lived human life. Not “convinced that Kantians in ethics are Kantians because of an argument that Kant or Korsgaard makes,” Andrew Youpa urges us to consider Spinoza’s view as “an alternative way of thinking about our lives—an alternative that is illuminating and insightful”. Since “the presentation of an illuminating alternative is arguably the best a philosopher can do”, this is (...)
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  7.  96
    The Question of Pantheism in the Second Objections to Descartes’s Meditations.Julie R. Klein - 2003 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 77 (3):357-379.
    Through a close analysis of texts from the Second Objections and Replies to the Meditations, this article addresses the tension between the pursuit of certainty and the preservation of divine transcendence in Descartes’s philosophy. Via a hypothetical “atheist geometer,” the Objectors charge Descartes with pantheism. While the Objectors’ motivations are not clear, the objection raises provocative questions about the relation of the divine and the human mind and about the being of created or dependent entities inDescartes’s metaphysics. Descartes contends that (...)
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  8.  82
    Aristotle and Descartes in Spinoza’s Approach to Matter and Body.Julie R. Klein - 2005 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 26 (2):157-176.
    Considered in its seventeenth-century context, Spinoza’s way of thinking about substance and nature is striking for its simultaneous refusal of Cartesian dualism and Hobbesian materialism. Spinoza knew both thinkers’ work well, yet sided with neither. Where Descartes divides substance into thinking and extended substance, and where Hobbes reduces all things to body, Spinoza espouses what is best called a double-aspect or non-reductive monism. The single substance of the Ethics is expressed as an infinity of modes in an infinity of attributes, (...)
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  9.  29
    Memory and the Extension of Thinking in Descartes’s Regulae.Julie R. Klein - 2002 - International Philosophical Quarterly 42 (1):23-40.
    This article discusses the impact of Descartes’s substance-dualism on his account of discursive reason. Taking the presentation of deduction in the Rules as a paradigmatic case of thought’s extension and movement in time, I analyze the relation between intuitive and discursive understanding and that between intellect and imagination. I focus specifically on the mediation of corporeal impressions and of intellectual ideas by ingenium. As intellectual, ingenium is a faculty of understanding; as joining with phantasia, ingenium has access to corporeal affections, (...)
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  10.  25
    Etienne Balibar's Marxist Spinoza.Julie R. Klein - 2000 - Philosophy Today 44 (Supplement):41-50.
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  11. Gersonides's Approach to Emanation and Transcendence: Evidence From the Theory of Intellection.Julie R. Klein - 2006 - In M. C. Pacheco & J. F. Meirinhos (eds.), Intellect Et Imagination Dans la Philosophie Médiévale = Intellect and Imagination in Medieval Philosophy = Intelecto E Imaginaçao Na Filosofia Medieval: Actes du Xie Congrès International de Philosophie Médiévale de la Société Internationale Pour l'Étude. Brepols Publishers. pp. I: 53-64.
     
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  12.  43
    Descartes’s Critique of the Atheist Geometer.Julie R. Klein - 2000 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 38 (3):429-445.
  13.  20
    The Cambridge Companion to Early Modern Philosophy (Review).Julie R. Klein - 2008 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (4):pp. 645-646.
    This admirable volume treats the period from Montaigne to Kant. As the editor, Donald Rutherford, promises in his Introduction, the volume reflects the broadly contextualist consensus among scholars in the field over the last few decades. Neither intellectual history nor abstract conceptual analysis, contextualist scholarship looks at the way philosophical ideas develop in concrete settings, within intellectual horizons, and in response to specific philosophical problems. Thus this Cambridge Companion is committed to the idea that a philosopher’s published works must be (...)
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