Results for 'Jun'ichirō Kawaguchi'

15 found
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  1. "Yuragi" No Chikara: Hayabusa No Kikan, Uchū No Hajimari, Kōji Na Seimei Kinō.Jun'ichirō Kawaguchi (ed.) - 2011 - Hanbaimoto Kagaku Dōjin.
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  2.  4
    Spontaneous Activation of Event Details in Episodic Future Simulation.Yuichi Ito, Yuri Terasawa, Satoshi Umeda & Jun Kawaguchi - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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    An Extension of a Parallel‐Distributed Processing Framework of Reading Aloud in Japanese: Human Nonword Reading Accuracy Does Not Require a Sequential Mechanism.Kenji Ikeda, Taiji Ueno, Yuichi Ito, Shinji Kitagami & Jun Kawaguchi - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S6).
    Humans can pronounce a nonword. Some researchers have interpreted this behavior as requiring a sequential mechanism by which a grapheme-phoneme correspondence rule is applied to each grapheme in turn. However, several parallel-distributed processing models in English have simulated human nonword reading accuracy without a sequential mechanism. Interestingly, the Japanese psycholinguistic literature went partly in the same direction, but it has since concluded that a sequential parsing mechanism is required to reproduce human nonword reading accuracy. In this study, by manipulating the (...)
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    Involvement of the Ventrolateral Prefrontal Cortex in Learning Others’ Bad Reputations and Indelible Distrust.Atsunobu Suzuki, Yuichi Ito, Sachiko Kiyama, Mitsunobu Kunimi, Hideki Ohira, Jun Kawaguchi, Hiroki C. Tanabe & Toshiharu Nakai - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  5.  8
    Visual Long-Term Memory and Change Blindness: Different Effects of Pre- and Post-Change Information on One-Shot Change Detection Using Meaningless Geometric Objects.Megumi Nishiyama & Jun Kawaguchi - 2014 - Consciousness and Cognition 30:105-117.
  6.  75
    Contro gli artisti. Tanizaki Jun’ichirō e l’uomo d’arte.Enea Bianchi - 2017 - Ágalma: Rivista di studi culturali e di estetica 33:54-64.
    Against the Artists. Jun'ichirō Tanizaki and the Man of Art. -/- This essay explores the concepts of "art" (gei) and "man of art" (geinin) in Tanizaki's works. These two notions belong to an ancient Japanese aesthetic tradition. The concept of 'gei' means "realization", "skill", but also "technique" and "ability". Traditional stage performances such as 'nō', 'kyōgen', 'bunraku', 'kabuki', are typical examples of 'gei'. On the other hand the concept of 'geinin' implies three pivotal aspects: 1) a strict and harsh (...)
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    Han'guk Kwahaksa Hakhoe-Ji: Journal of the Korean History of Science Society. Song Sang-yongHistoria Scientiarum: The International Journal of the History of Science Society of Japan. Jun FujimuraKagakusi Kenkyu: Journal of History of Science, Japan. Ichiro YabeZiran Kexueshi Yanjiu . Lin Wenjao. [REVIEW]Yung Sik Kim - 1991 - Isis 82 (2):291-293.
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  8.  18
    The Preattentive Emperor has No Clothes: A Dynamic Redressing.Vincent Di Lollo, Jun-Ichiro Kawahara, Samantha M. Zuvic & Troy A. W. Visser - 2001 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 130 (3):479.
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    Measuring the Spatial Distribution of the Metaattentional Spotlight.Jun-Ichiro Kawahara - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):107-124.
    Studies in cognitive psychology have shown that the deployment of visual attention operates under spatial limitations, rendering its assignment to multiple locations difficult or costly. This study explored whether this conventional understanding applies to human metaattention as well. I measured the spatial distribution of metaattention during viewing of natural scenes and found that participants believed they could attend to multiple locations simultaneously. Study 2 tested whether this tendency could be modified by information about the tendency to overestimation. After participants were (...)
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  10.  18
    Assessing Acute Stress with the Implicit Association Test.Hirotsune Sato & Jun-Ichiro Kawahara - 2012 - Cognition and Emotion 26 (1):129-135.
  11. Aesthetics.Susan L. Feagin & Patrick Maynard (eds.) - 1997 - Oxford University Press.
    Can we ever claim to understand a work of art or be objective about it? Why have cultures thought it important to separate out a group of objects and call them art? What does aesthetics contribute to our understanding of the natural landscape? Are the concepts of art and the aesthetic elitist? Addressing these and other issues in aesthetics, this important new Oxford Reader includes articles by authors ranging from Aristotle and Xie-He to Jun'ichiro Tanizaki, Michael Baxandall, and Susan Sontag. (...)
     
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  12.  16
    Attention Capture Without Awareness in a Non-Spatial Selection Task.Chris Oriet, Mamata Pandey & Jun-Ichiro Kawahara - 2017 - Consciousness and Cognition 48:117-128.
  13.  13
    Informal Face-to-Face Interaction Improves Mood State Reflected in Prefrontal Cortex Activity.Jun-Ichiro Watanabe, Hirokazu Atsumori & Masashi Kiguchi - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  14. In Praise of Shadows.Jun Ichiro Tanizaki, Thomas J. Harper & Edward G. Seidensticker - 1977 - Leete's Island Books.
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  15.  15
    The Effect of Unconscious Priming on Temporal Production☆.Fuminori Ono & Jun-Ichiro Kawahara - 2005 - Consciousness and Cognition 14 (3):474-482.
    We examined the effects of unconscious priming on temporal-interval production. In Experiment 1, participants were instructed to keep visual displays on a screen for 2500 ms intervals. Half of the displays were repeated across blocks throughout the entire experiment, and the others were newly generated from trial to trial. The displays consisted of patterns so complex that the participants could not intentionally memorize them. The results showed that significantly more time elapsed for old displays than for new displays before participants (...)
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