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  1.  8
    Human Development Without Democratic Accountability: How Regressive Taxation Contributes to Human Development Through State Capacity.Junko Kato & Seiki Tanaka - 2018 - Japanese Journal of Political Science 19 (3):429-443.
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  2.  7
    The Divergent Paths of Tax Development During Different Waves of Democratization.Junko Kato & Miki Toyofuku - 2018 - Japanese Journal of Political Science 19 (3):333-352.
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  3.  34
    Coalition Governments, Party Switching, and the Rise and Decline of Parties: Changing Japanese Party Politics Since 1993.Junko Kato & Yuto Kannon - 2008 - Japanese Journal of Political Science 9 (3):341-365.
    Since 1993, coalition governments have replaced the 38-year-long, one-party dominance of the Liberal Democratic Party (the LDP) in Japan. Except for one year, from 1993 to 1994, the LDP has remained a key party in successive governing coalitions, but the dynamics of party competition has been completely transformed since the period of the LDP's dominance. Although the LDP has survived to form a variety of coalitions ranging from a minority to an over-sized majority, since 1998 the Democratic Party of Japan (...)
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    Kathleen Thelen, How Institutions Evolve–The Political Economy of Skills in Germany, Britain, the United States, and Japan, Cambridge University Press, $29.99, ISBN: 0521546745. [REVIEW]Junko Kato - 2005 - Japanese Journal of Political Science 6 (3):439-440.
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  5.  4
    Policy and Party Competition in Japan After the Election of 2000.Junko Kato & Michael Laver - 2003 - Japanese Journal of Political Science 4 (1):121-133.
    This paper reports the results of the latest in a series of expert surveys of party policy positions in Japan and considers some of the implications of these results for our understanding of party competition and government formation in recent Japanese politics.
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