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  1.  26
    Descartes and the Metaphysics of Human Nature.Justin Skirry - 2005 - Review of Metaphysics 15:1-200.
    The traditional account of mind/body union attributed to Descartes supposesthat the immaterial, thinking mind and the material, non-thinking bodyinteract by means of efficient causation - that the mind causes events in thebody, e.g. the voluntary raising of an arm, and vice versa, e.g. the visualsensation of a tree. But this gives rise to a notorious philosophical problem:how can this causal interaction occur between the spiritual mind and thephysical body since they have absolutely nothing in common and cannot comeinto contact with (...)
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  2.  29
    Descartes's Conceptual Distinction and its Ontological Import.Justin Skirry - 2004 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 42 (2):121-144.
    : Descartes' conceptual distinction (or distinctio rationis) is commonly understood to be a distinction created by the mind's activity without a foundation in re. This paper challenges this understanding partially based on a letter to an unknown correspondent in which Descartes claims not to admit distinctions without a foundation. He goes on to claim that his conceptual distinction is not a distinctio rationis ratiocinantis (i.e. a distinction of reasoning reason) but is something like a formal distinction or, more precisely, a (...)
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  3.  26
    Three Kinds of Certainty in Moore's Defense of Common Sense.Justin Skirry - 2003 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 20 (4):393 - 406.
  4.  28
    A Hylomorphic Interpretation of Descartes's Theory of Mind-Body Union.Justin Skirry - 2001 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 75:267-283.
    I contend that Descartes’s view of mind-body union is not a Platonic view in which the soul uses the body as its vehicle, but hylomorphic in that mind and body form a single unit. I argue that Descartes’s view is most like Ockham’s, and therefore Descartes is entitled to maintain a hylomorphic theory to the same extent that Ockham is. I argue further that the soul is the substantial form of human being, and that mind and body are incomplete substances (...)
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  5.  81
    Sartre on William Faulkner's Metaphysics of Time in the Sound and the Fury.Justin Skirry - 2001 - Sartre Studies International 7 (2):15-43.
    Jean Paul Sartre in his essay, "On 'The Sound and the Fury': Time in the work of Faulkner," states that the technique of the fiction writer always relates back to his metaphysics (OSF 79). Faulkner's clock-based or chronological metaphysics of time found in The Sound and the Fury is the focal point of Sartre's criticism of this work. His main criticism that the novel's metaphysics of time leaves its characters with only pasts and no futures led some Faulkner scholars to (...)
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  6.  5
    Does Descartes’s Real Distinction Argument Prove Too Much?Justin Skirry - 2004 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 78 (3):399-423.
    Arnauld raised the concern that Descartes’s real distinction argument proved too much, because it seemed to lead us back to the Platonic view according to which the mind uses the body as its vehicle. Descartes responds by pointing out that he argued against this account of mind-body union in the Sixth Meditation. Descartes believes he did not prove too much, because he offers an argument against this view whose premises and conclusion are consistent with the real distinction argument. In this (...)
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  7.  31
    Does Descartes's Real Distinction Argument Prove Too Much?Justin Skirry - 2004 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 78 (3):399-423.
    Arnauld raised the concern that Descartes’s real distinction argument proved too much, because it seemed to lead us back to the Platonic view according to which the mind uses the body as its vehicle. Descartes responds by pointing out that he argued against this account of mind-body union in the Sixth Meditation. Descartes believes he did not prove too much, because he offers an argument against this view whose premises and conclusion are consistent with the real distinction argument. In this (...)
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  8.  36
    Descartes: The Mind-Body Distinction.Justin Skirry - 2006 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  9.  34
    Silencing the Demon's Advocate: The Strategy of Descartes' Meditations (Review).Justin Skirry - 2009 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (2):pp. 315-316.
    Ronald Rubin's new book provides a refreshingly even-handed interpretation and analysis of Descartes's Meditations. Rubin skillfully employs short expositions of Latin philosophical terminology, textual analysis, and contemporary analytic method to arrive at a largely sympathetic understanding of this seminal work. But his development and employment of the heuristic device of the "Demon's Advocate" surely sets this work apart from the other, vast literature on the Meditations.The first three chapters lay the groundwork for Rubin's study. Chapters 1–2 examine Descartes's use of (...)
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  10.  17
    Descartes.Justin Skirry - 2009 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 83 (2):298-302.
  11.  18
    Review: The Architecture of Matter: Galileo to Kant. [REVIEW]Justin Skirry - 2006 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (2):321-322.
    Justin Skirry - The Architecture of Matter: Galileo to Kant - Journal of the History of Philosophy 44:2 Journal of the History of Philosophy 44.2 321-322 Thomas Holden, The Architecture of Matter: Galileo to Kant. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2004. Pp. x + 305. Cloth $74.00. Most scholars believe that the problem of infinite divisibility that plagued early modern natural philosophy was an entirely mathematical issue and, therefore, resulted from the short-comings of early modern mathematics. Accordingly, advances in geometry, topology and (...)
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  12.  10
    The Numerical Monist Interpretation of Parmenides.Justin Skirry - 2001 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 39 (3):403-417.
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  13.  1
    Descartes: A Biography. [REVIEW]Justin Skirry - 2009 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 83 (2):298-302.
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  14.  4
    Book Discussion.Justin Skirry & Does Descartes’S. Real Distinction - 2004 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 78 (4).
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  15. A Hylomorphic Interpretation of Descartes’s Theory of Mind-Body Union.Justin Skirry - 2001 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 75:267-283.
    I contend that Descartes’s view of mind-body union is not a Platonic view in which the soul uses the body as its vehicle, but hylomorphic in that mind and body form a single unit. I argue that Descartes’s view is most like Ockham’s, and therefore Descartes is entitled to maintain a hylomorphic theory to the same extent that Ockham is. I argue further that the soul is the substantial form of human being, and that mind and body are incomplete substances (...)
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  16. Sartre on William Faulkner's Metaphysics of Time in The Sound and the Fury.Justin Skirry - 2001 - Sartre Studies International 7:15-43.
    Jean Paul Sartre in his essay, "On 'The Sound and the Fury': Time in the work of Faulkner," states that the technique of the fiction writer always relates back to his metaphysics. Faulkner's clock-based or chronological metaphysics of time found in The Sound and the Fury is the focal point of Sartre's criticism of this work. His main criticism that the novel's metaphysics of time leaves its characters with only pasts and no futures led some Faulkner scholars to seek the (...)
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  17. The Architecture of Matter: Galileo to Kant. [REVIEW]Justin Skirry - 2006 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 44:321-322.
    Justin Skirry - The Architecture of Matter: Galileo to Kant - Journal of the History of Philosophy 44:2 Journal of the History of Philosophy 44.2 321-322 Thomas Holden, The Architecture of Matter: Galileo to Kant. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2004. Pp. x + 305. Cloth $74.00. Most scholars believe that the problem of infinite divisibility that plagued early modern natural philosophy was an entirely mathematical issue and, therefore, resulted from the short-comings of early modern mathematics. Accordingly, advances in geometry, topology and (...)
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