Results for 'Juvenal Murwanashyaka'

243 found
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  1.  1
    First-order concatenation theory with bounded quantifiers.Lars Kristiansen & Juvenal Murwanashyaka - forthcoming - Archive for Mathematical Logic:1-28.
    We study first-order concatenation theory with bounded quantifiers. We give axiomatizations with interesting properties, and we prove some normal-form results. Finally, we prove a number of decidability and undecidability results.
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  2.  3
    The Monkey's Off Our Back: An Alternative Reading of Juvenal 5.153–5.Ryan M. Pasco - forthcoming - Classical Quarterly:1-9.
    Readers have struggled to interpret an image from the end of Juvenal's fifth satire, a poem which focusses upon the poor hospitality shown to a dinner guest, Trebius, at the hands of his host, Virro. After repeatedly juxtaposing the luxurious food served to Virro with the scant fare served to Trebius, Juvenal describes the final course of the cena. He again contrasts the host's hyper-abundance with his guest's mere scraps : Virro sibi et reliquis Virronibus illa iubebit poma (...)
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  3.  17
    Juvenal 1.149 and 10.106–7.D. A. Kidd - 1964 - Classical Quarterly 14 (1):103-108.
    The traditional interpretation of line 149 understands in praecipiti as a metaphor expressing the height that vice has reached in Juvenal's day. Vice is now ‘at its zenith’ , ‘at its highest point’ , ‘auf demGipfel’ , ‘at its acme’ , ‘a son comble’ , ‘at a climax’ , ‘at a dizzy height’ . Lewis and Short have a special sub-heading, II. B. 3. b. , for this example of praeceps and translate ‘at its point of culmination’.
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  4.  37
    Dictionnaire des Philosophes Antiques, Tome III: D’Éccélos À Juvénal. [REVIEW]Yvon LaFrance - 2002 - Dialogue 41 (4):798-801.
    Voici le troisième tome de cette entreprise colossale que constitue le Dictionnaire des philosophes antiques, dans lequel sont recensés de façon exhaustive tous les noms reliés de près ou de loin à la philosophie, entendue au sens large du terme, sur une période qui s’étend des présocratiques jusqu’aux derniers néoplatoniciens du VIe siècle. Le premier tome paraissait en 1989 et couvrait par ordre alphabétique 517 noms, d’Abamon à Axiothée. Le deuxième tome paraissait en 1994 et présentait 540 noms allant de (...)
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  5.  10
    Three Cruces in Juvenal.Michael Hendry - 1998 - Classical Quarterly 48 (1):252-261.
    A. E. Housman has written that the context of Juvenal 5.140 is ‘the most obscure in Juvenal’. I am primarily concerned with the following five lines, but the entire passage, and its position in the poem, must also be examined.
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  6.  10
    Juvenal, the Phaedrus, and the Truth About Rome.Alex Hardie - 1998 - Classical Quarterly 48 (01):234-.
    In Juvenal's third satire the main speaker, Umbricius, delivers a speech of farewell as he prepares to leave Rome. In it, he mounts a sustained attack on life in the capital. By contrast, he praises Italian country towns, a combination of laudatio and vituperatio which is foreshadowed in the prefatory praise of provincial Cumae and denigration of Rome.
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  7.  2
    Historicizing Satire in Juvenal.Michael Ritter - 2019 - Classical Antiquity 38 (2):250-274.
    The implications of the persona theory pose a problem for the interpretation of Juvenal's early satires, because it presents the satirist as intent on nullifying his didactic stances. This leaves us with an unsatisfactory conclusion that excises Juvenal's persistent treatment of themes consistent with contemporaneous authors who were similarly engaged in blackening the reputations of the famous dead. This article argues that a strict application of persona theory isolates Juvenal's satirist from his volatile contemporary climate by excluding (...)
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  8.  24
    An Uncollated MS of Juvenal.C. E. Stuart - 1909 - Classical Quarterly 3 (01):1-.
    A Page of this MS, which however I discovered independently, is reproduced by M. Chatelain in his Paléographie des Classiques Latins, and for an account of the codex I refer to vol. ii. p. 11 of that work. The volume consists of four parts: Juvenal, ff. 1–47; Persius, ff. 48–59; Horace, ff. 60–93; Juvenal, ff. 94–113. This last part contains Sat. i. 1–ii. 66, iii. 32–vi. 437, i.e. two intermediate leaves, the two outside double leaves of the first (...)
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  9. A sátira X, de Juvenal.Amós Coêlho da Silva - 2009 - Principia: Revista do Departamento de Letras Clássicas e Orientais do Instituto de Letras 1 (18):53-59.
    Poetas que se destacaram pela sátira. Ecos satíricos em outros discursos poéticos. Juvenal, que não soube mentir, ocupou o seu tempo tentando a educar os romanos: Quid Romae faciam? Mentiri néscio. Que fazer em Roma? Não sei mentir.(I, 3, 41) A emergência urbana tornou o povo romano civilizado, mas insensato em suas preces suplicantes de desejos aos deuses: Juvenal, Sátiras, X.
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  10.  9
    Juvenal, Satire 1.155—7.Anthony A. Barrett - 1977 - Classical Quarterly 27 (02):438-.
    These lines, presented as they appear in the O.C.T., are among the most difficult and hotly disputed that Juvenal wrote. The poet defends his decision not to attack contemporary politicians directly: ‘expose a Tigellinus’, he says, ‘and you know what the consequences will be’. It has long been recognized that the consequences related are probably inspired by those suffered by the Christians in A.D. 64 during the reign of Nero, and so vividly described by Tacitus.
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  11.  1
    As canções populares e o sentimento de missão educadora dos intelectuais rom'nticos: o exemplo do poeta Juvenal Galeno no contexto do romantismo brasileiro. [REVIEW]Joao Batista Andrade Filho & Francisco Ari Andrade - 2019 - Conjectura: Filosofia E Educação 24:019038.
    A partir do século XVIII, na Europa, muitos intelectuais europeus passaram a alimentar o gosto e o interesse pelas questões populares. O filósofo alemão Johann Gottfried Herder é considerado um dos expontes que influenciaram muitos intelectuais, cujas ideias alimentaram o movimento romântico. Contrariando a mentalidade racionalizante iluminista, tais ideias conduziram os adeptos dessa tendência a voltarem-se aos estudos da tradição campesina, buscando, no povo e no seu passado glorioso, o elemento constituidor da nacionalidade, particularmente na canção e na poesia populares. (...)
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  12.  2
    Juvenal 5.104: Text and Intertext.Ben Cartlidge - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (1):370-377.
    This paper draws on Juvenal's intertextual relationship with comedy to solve a textual crux involving fish-names. The monograph by Ferriss-Hill will no doubt warn scholarship away from the treatment of Roman satire's intertextuality with Old Comedy for a time. Yet, Greek comedy's influence on Roman satire is far from exhausted, and this paper will show that this influence goes more widely, and more deeply, than is usually seen. In time, one might hope for a renewed monographic treatment of the (...)
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  13.  16
    The Earliest Scholiast on Juvenal.G. B. Townend - 1972 - Classical Quarterly 22 (02):376-.
    Among classical Latin poets, Juvenal is unusually richly provided with ancient scholia; at the same time, the scholia exhibit an unusual degree of ignorance and sheer stupidity. What is perhaps most surprising, however, is the extent to which these commentators appear to have been worse informed than we are today concerning the identity of individuals who appear in the satires.
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  14.  6
    Glacle Aspersvs Macvlis: Juvenal 5. 104.A. T. Von & S. Bradshaw - 1965 - Classical Quarterly 15 (01):121-.
    The reader of Juvenal's fifth satire, making his way through the new Oxford text edited by W. V. Clausen, finds the sweep of the poet's indignant rhetoric interrupted by the obeli of 104. Reference to Clausen's paper which he quotes in support of his proposed reading glaucis sparsus reveals that he proceeds from the assumption that the line is corrupt, and evidence that this is the case must be sought elsewhere.
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  15.  11
    Notes on Juvenal, Apuleius, Etc.S. T. Collins - 1909 - Classical Quarterly 3 (04):279-.
    IN the Sixteenth Satire, the first topic Juvenal takes up in detail is the impossibility of obtaining satisfactory legal redress from the praetorians. The account has two divisions: you will have a bad time yourself in the military court, and what friend will come to support you ?
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  16.  17
    Juvenal 8. 58–59.S. H. Braund - 1981 - Classical Quarterly 31 (01):221-.
    Juvenal opens his eighth Satire with the question stemmata quid faciunt?, supplies an answer in line 20, nobilitas sola est atque unica virtus, and devotes the rest of the poem to exhorting his addressee to virtuous activity, both by negative exempla drawn from the degenerate nobility and by positive exempla drawn from the plebs, novi homines and the like. In lines 39–70 he addresses one particularly self-important noble and attempts to deflate his bombastic pride: in 56–67 he adduces an (...)
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  17.  7
    MSS. Of Persius and Juvenal at Valenciennes.S. G. Owen - 1912 - Classical Quarterly 6 (01):21-.
    The MS. 410 of the Bibliotheque publique of Valenciennes consists of 70 leaves of vellum, written in Caroline minuscules in the 11th century. The titles Ivvenalis liber primvs incipit and Explicit Ivvenalis. Incipit Persivs are in small rustic capitals. The MS. contains Juvenal and Persius in that order. The last leaf but one has been cut out, that containing Pers. vi. 8 dant–vi. 71 exits. Juvenal, Sat. xvi, follows at the end of Sat. xiv, fol. 56v: then Sat. (...)
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  18.  6
    Juvenal in Ireland?R. Knox McElderry - 1922 - Classical Quarterly 16 (3-4):151-.
    If such rhetorical flourishes are allowed any weight against indisputable historical fact, what strange inferences might we not draw from Juvenal's exclamation: “… Arma quidem ultra litora Iuuernae promouimus” or “de conducendo loquitur iam rhetore Thyle.“’.
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  19.  3
    Juvenal 1.142–4.J. D. Morgan - 1988 - Classical Quarterly 38 (1):264-265.
    For a defence of ‘crudum’ against Courtney's strictures, see the reviews by Goodyear and Reeve. I am presently concerned not with the unresolved crux in verse 144, but with the medical reason for the death of the glutton. Galen, quoted by Mayor, warned that one should not bathe after eating να μ μραξις κατ νερς κα παρ γνηται. More recently, Courtney ad loc. has quoted Persius 3.98ff. and has attributed the death to ‘apoplexy’, which in more modern parlance is called (...)
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  20.  7
    Juvenal 1.155–7.B. Baldwin - 1979 - Classical Quarterly 29 (01):162-.
    A. A. Barrett's recent addition of a raeda to Juvenal 1.155 is a novel and ingenious contribution to the ago-old debate over the text and meaning of the passage in question. His proposal is, however, vulnerable to the following objections. First, it is worth emphasizing that there is no manuscript variant for the traditional reading taeda. In a passage so fraught with problems and textual discrepancies, this is probably suggestive.
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  21.  6
    Juvenal 10. 175–6.D. A. Kidd - 1969 - Classical Quarterly 19 (01):196-.
    What is the point of isdem ? Editors of Juvenal pass over the word without comment and most translators are content with an unexplained ‘the same’. But if it means ‘the same as the ships that made the bridge’, it is odd that it should be put with the first clause. On the other hand, if Juvenal means the same ships as those that passed through the Athos canal, the reference must be to the fleet that sailed to (...)
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  22.  6
    Juvenal 1.142–4.J. D. Morgan - 1988 - Classical Quarterly 38 (01):264-.
    For a defence of ‘crudum’ against Courtney's strictures, see the reviews by Goodyear and Reeve. I am presently concerned not with the unresolved crux in verse 144, but with the medical reason for the death of the glutton. Galen , quoted by Mayor, warned that one should not bathe after eating να μ μραξις κατ νερς κα παρ γνηται. More recently, Courtney ad loc. has quoted Persius 3.98ff. and has attributed the death to ‘apoplexy’, which in more modern parlance is (...)
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  23.  3
    Juvenal, 1. 155–7.John G. Griffith - 1979 - Classical Quarterly 29 (02):463-.
    It is gratifying to read, in a recent issue of this periodical, Mr. A. A. Barrett's informed exposition of the syntax of this passage, even though he balks at the need to extract a grammatical subject for the verb deducit in 157 from the relative pronoun qua in the previous line. However his persuasive presentation of what he relies on as evidence in support of his suggested interpretation from the mosaics from Zliten in Tripolitania, which portray scenes in an amphitheatre, (...)
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  24.  2
    Classis Numerosa: Juvenal, Satire 7. 151.D. S. Wiesen - 1971 - Classical Quarterly 21 (02):506-.
    What is the meaning of numerosa? From the fifteenth-century commentaries of Valla and Mancinelli to the most recent translation of Juvenal into English, by Peter Green, interpreters are in nearly unanimous agreement that numerosa describes a particular annoyance of the rhetor's unrewarding life, namely, the large size of his classes. A few commentaries, however, touch upon another interpretation, although without defending it. Pearson and Strong, after translating numerosa as ‘overgrown’, continue: numerosa might mean “in rhythmical cadence”, referring to the (...)
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  25.  42
    Juvénal: Saturae Iii, Iv, V. Édition, Introduction Et Commentaire de René Marache. (Collection Érasme, 15.) Pp. [Vi] + 143. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 1965. Paper, 9 Fr. [REVIEW]E. J. Kenney - 1966 - The Classical Review 16 (3):412-412.
  26.  39
    Juvenal: Satires. Translated by Jerome Mazzaro with an Introduction and Notes by Richard E. Braun. Pp. [Viii]+235. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1965. Cloth, $5.00. [REVIEW]E. J. Kenney - 1966 - The Classical Review 16 (1):118-118.
  27.  35
    JUVENAL, SATIRE 3 - S.M. Manzella Decimo Giunio Giovenale: Satira III. Pp. Viii + 471. Naples: Liguori Editore, 2011. Paper, €34.99. ISBN: 978-88-207-5502-7. [REVIEW]Yvan Nadeau - 2013 - The Classical Review 63 (1):129-131.
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  28.  8
    Food and Fictionalization in Juvenal's Eleventh Satire.Evan J. Armacost - 2019 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 113 (1):65-86.
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  29.  23
    P. Green : Juvenal. The Sixteen Satires. Pp. Lxvii + 252. London: Penguin Books, 1998 . Paper, £7.99. ISBN: 0-14-044704-0. [REVIEW]Michael Coffey - 1999 - The Classical Review 49 (2):572-573.
  30. Recensão A: Juvénal-Saturae III, IV, V.Walter de Sousa Medeiros - 1966 - Humanitas 17.
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  31.  23
    A Persius and Juvenal Companion - Braund, Osgood a Companion to Persius and Juvenal. Pp. XVI + 612, Ills. Malden, Ma and Oxford: Wiley–Blackwell, 2012. Cased, £120, €148.80, Us$195. Isbn: 978-0-470-67425-3. [REVIEW]Amy Norgard - 2014 - The Classical Review 64 (1):146-149.
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  32.  12
    The Satires of Juvenal, Translated by Charles Plumb. London: Panther Books, 1968. Paper, 42½P.M. L. Clarke - 1972 - The Classical Review 22 (3):414-414.
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  33.  37
    The Satiric Voice: Program, Form and Meaning in Persius and Juvenal[REVIEW]F. Jones - 1993 - The Classical Review 43 (1):182-183.
  34.  11
    Two Passages in Juvenal's Eighth Satire.P. Brown - 1972 - Classical Quarterly 22 (2):374-375.
    The words I wish to delete in 48-9 spoil a ‘tricolon crescendo’ whose three members are clearly marked and whose verbs are perhaps deliberately varied in person and tense. The parataxis by means of hic is awkward, and the words seem to be a versified gloss. The Scholiast says : id est: to nobilis tantum et imperitus. nam de plebe, id est de humili familia, eloquentes exeunt, qui nobilium imperitorum causas defendunt; but that could be a paraphrase based on the (...)
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  35.  4
    Juvenal and Globalisation. Umurhan Juvenal's Global Awareness. Circulation, Connectivity, and Empire. Pp. X + 190, Map. London and New York: Routledge, 2018. Cased, £105, Us$140. Isbn: 978-1-138-12530-8.1. [REVIEW]Gergő Gellérfi - forthcoming - The Classical Review:1-2.
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  36.  15
    A READING OF JUVENAL, BOOK 4 - Godwin Juvenal: Satires, Book IV. Pp. Viii + 219. Oxford: Aris & Phillips, Oxbow Books, 2016. Paper, £19.99, US$35 . ISBN: 978-1-91057-233-7. [REVIEW]Osman Umurhan - 2019 - The Classical Review 69 (1):137-139.
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  37.  8
    Juvenal and Anxiety. Nappa Making Men Ridiculous. Juvenal and the Anxieties of the Individual. Pp. XII + 224. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2018. Cased, Us$75. Isbn: 978-0-472-13066-5. [REVIEW]Biagio Santorelli - forthcoming - The Classical Review:1-2.
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  38.  38
    Wykked Wyves and the Woes of Marriage: Misogamous Literature From Juvenal to Chaucer.Katharina M. Wilson, Elizabeth M. Makowski. [REVIEW]H. Kelly - 1992 - Speculum 67 (3):755-757.
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  39.  9
    Richard Jenkyns: Three Classical Poets: Sappho, Catullus and Juvenal. Pp. Ix+243. London: Duckworth, 1982. £24.Roland Mayer - 1984 - The Classical Review 34 (1):133-133.
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  40.  7
    The Date of the Scholia Vetustiora on Juvenal.Alan Cameron - 2010 - Classical Quarterly 60 (2):569-576.
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  41.  28
    The Grand Style in the Satires of Juvenal. By Inez Gertrude Scott. Smith College Classical Studies, No. 8. Pp. Ii + 118. Northampton, Mass., 1927. 75 Cents. [REVIEW]W. B. Anderson - 1928 - The Classical Review 42 (1):43-43.
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  42.  9
    Braund Juvenal and Persius. Pp. Xiv + 536. Cambridge, MA and London: Harvard University Press, 2004. Cased, £14.50. ISBN: 0-674-99612-7. [REVIEW]Catherine Keane - 2006 - The Classical Review 56 (1):127-129.
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  43.  39
    A Study of Juvenal Enzo V. Marmorale: Giovenale. Pp. 157. Naples: Ricciardi, 1938. Paper, L. 10.Gilbert Highet - 1939 - The Classical Review 53 (02):71-72.
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  44.  39
    On Juvenal Sat. III., 203.W. O. Sproull - 1900 - The Classical Review 14 (04):218-.
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  45.  32
    On the New Fragments of Juvenal.J. P. Postgate - 1899 - The Classical Review 13 (4):206-208.
  46.  24
    Juvenal and the Society of His Day. [REVIEW]William Barr - 1978 - The Classical Review 28 (2):256-257.
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  47.  33
    On Juvenal, Sat. I 102 Ff.N. P. Vlachos - 1900 - The Classical Review 14 (04):217-218.
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  48.  40
    Juvenal, Iii. 297–9.R. L. Dunbabin - 1945 - The Classical Review 59 (01):11-12.
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  49.  40
    Studies in Juvenal P. Ercole: Studi Giovenaliani. Pp. 355. Lanciano: Carabba, 1935. Paper, L. 15.Gilbert Highet - 1938 - The Classical Review 52 (02):79-81.
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  50.  40
    Glanis and Juvenal V. 104. (See C.R. LII. 56.).L. R. Palmer, S. G. Owen & D'Arcy W. Thompson - 1938 - The Classical Review 52 (04):115-119.
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