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  1.  71
    What’s So Bad About Self-Sacrifice?: Immolation, Abnegation, Effacement, and Donation in Ethics.Kalynne Hackney Pudner - 2007 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 81:241-250.
    A persistent worry in the ethical literature on care and empathy is that the agent is prone to self-sacrifice by the requisite state of engrossment in or engagement of the other. Addressing this worry particularly as expressed in feminist philosophy, I argue that the standard conceptions of self-sacrifice conflate four distinct relations of the self to its autonomous will: self-immolation (destroying one’s own autonomy), self-abnegation (disowning one’s autonomy), self-effacement (devaluing one’s autonomy) and self-donation (dedicating one’s autonomy). The latter, far from (...)
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  2.  19
    “Comment Me Back”: Expectations of Intimacy in the Culture of Blog.Kalynne Hackney Pudner - 2007 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 21 (1):65-71.
    Electronic communication raises challenges to our understanding of the ethics of interpersonal relationship. This paper examines one area of electronic communication, the practice of journal blogging, and its correlation to one form of interpersonal relationship, intimacy. Analyzing intimacy in terms of knowledge, esteem, and assimilation, the paper argues that while journal blogging would seem to enhance and facilitate these relational elements, the practice in fact and in principle undermines them.
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  3.  13
    The Philosopher-Mom: Kalynne Hackney Pudner Applies Logic, Metaphysics, Epistemology, Ethics and the History of Philosophy to Family Life at Large.Kalynne Hackney Pudner - 2008 - Philosophy Now 68:31-33.
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  4.  32
    Leading Them to Lady Wisdom: Putting Applied Ethics Courses in Broader Philosophical Context.Kalynne Hackney Pudner - 2008 - Teaching Philosophy 31 (3):255-266.
    Many postsecondary institutions now require an ethics course for graduation, typically one in applied ethics. This paper considers the justification for such a requirement from the institution’s perspective, on the one hand, and what might be a justification from a philosophical perspective, on the other; it then argues that teaching applied ethics courses in accordance with the philosophical justification satisfies the institutional justification as well. Moreover, the philosophical perspective, which aims to introduce compulsory ethics students to an understanding, appreciation and (...)
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