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  1.  65
    Business Ethics Research: A Global Perspective. [REVIEW]Kam C. Chan, Hung-Gay Fung & Jot Yau - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (1):39 - 53.
    Using 10 years of publication data (1999-2008) from 10 leading business ethics journals, we examine global patterns of business ethics research and contributing institutions and scholars. Although U.S. academic institutions continue to lead in the contributions toward business ethics research, Asian and European institutions have made significant progress. Our study shows that business ethics research output is closely linked to the missions of the institutions driven by their values or religious belief. An additional analysis of the productivity of each highly (...)
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  2.  72
    Predominant Sources and Contributors of Influential Business Ethics Research: Evidence and Implications From a Threshold Citation Analysis.Kam C. Chan, Hung-Gay Fung & Jot Yau - 2013 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 22 (3):263-276.
    Influential or frequently cited business ethics research does not appear in a vacuum; our study reveals its predominant sources and contributors by discipline. By examining citations from articles published in three top business ethics journals (Journal of Business Ethics, Business Ethics Quarterly and Business Ethics: A European Review) over the period 2004–2008, we document that the preponderance of influential business ethics research comes primarily from the management faculty. In addition, management journals and management books are the predominant sources for influential (...)
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  3.  15
    Predominant Sources and Contributors of Influential Business Ethics Research: Evidence and Implications From a Threshold Citation Analysis.Kam C. Chan, Hung-Gay Fung & Jot Yau - 2013 - Business Ethics: A European Review 22 (3):263-276.
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  4.  19
    A Citation Analysis of Business Ethics Research: A Global Perspective.Kam C. Chan, Anna Fung, Hung-Gay Fung & Jot Yau - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (3):557-573.
    This study provides a global perspective on citations of articles published in ten business ethics journals between 1999 and 2012 and establishes three findings. First, the results indicate that Journal of Business Ethics and Business and Society are the two top business ethics journals based on the distribution of normalized citations received. Second, although North America, particularly the US, remains the top producer of business ethics research, it has been surpassed by Europe in terms of weighted normalized research citations received (...)
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  5.  16
    Social Trust and Corporate Misconduct: Evidence From China.Wang Dong, Hongling Han, Yun Ke & Kam C. Chan - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 151 (2):539-562.
    We study whether greater social trust is associated with a lower incidence of corporate misconduct. Both social norm and network theory suggest that social trust can affect managerial behavior and reduce the likelihood of misconduct behavior. Consistent with this prediction, we find that social trust is negatively associated with corporate misconduct behavior. Moreover, we show that, when media coverage is higher, the negative relation between social trust and corporate misconduct behavior is more pronounced. Further analyses suggest that social trust can (...)
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  6.  6
    Cultural Diversity and Corporate Tax Avoidance: Evidence From Chinese Private Enterprises.Guangyong Lei, Wanwan Wang, Junli Yu & Kam C. Chan - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-23.
    We examine the impact of a city’s cultural diversity on a firm’s tax avoidance. Our findings suggest that when a firm is located in a culturally diverse city, it exhibits less TA than a firm located in a less culturally diverse city. The findings are robust to alternative metrics of cultural diversity and TA and after accounting for omitted sample bias and endogeneity. Additional analysis suggests that the negative impact of cultural diversity on a firm’s TA is more salient in (...)
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