Results for 'Kapusta Stephanie'

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  1. Misgendering and Its Moral Contestability.Stephanie Julia Kapusta - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (3):502-519.
    In this article, I consider the harms inflicted upon transgender persons through “misgendering,” that is, such deployments of gender terms that diminish transgender persons' self-respect, limit the discursive resources at their disposal to define their own gender, and cause them microaggressive psychological harms. Such deployments are morally contestable, that is, they can be challenged on ethical or political grounds. Two characterizations of “woman” proposed in the feminist literature are critiqued from this perspective. When we consider what would happen to transgender (...)
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  2. Intersex Diagnostics and Prognostics: Imposing Sex-Predicate Determinacy.Stephanie Julia Kapusta - 2017 - Topoi 36 (3):539-548.
    I offer a reconstruction of contemporary medical procedures of sex assignment for infants with intersex conditions. In the perspective adopted, sex assignment to intersexed newborns can be understood as a procedure that imposes determinate sex predicates. The account describes two stages of sex assignment. At the first stage of the process, the sex predicates ‘female’, ‘male’, or ‘intersexed’ are taken to denote genital morphology. Initial genital assessment of newborns imposes clear boundaries upon the extensions of these predicates through diagnostic schemes (...)
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  3. Mary Daly’s Philosophy: Some Bergsonian Themes.Stephanie Kapusta - 2021 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 7 (2).
    The primary goal of this article is point out certain close parallels between some ideas of the radical feminist theorist Mary Daly and those of the French philosopher Henri Bergson. These similarities are particularly striking regarding distinctions made by both authors between two fundamentally contrasting types of cognitive faculty, of time and temporal experience, and of self and emotion. Daly departs from Bergson inasmuch as she employs these distinctions in her own way. She does not—like Bergson—employ them to depict the (...)
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  4.  61
    Contesting Gender Concepts, Language and Norms: Three Critical Articles on Ethical and Political Aspects of Gender Non-conformity.Stephanie Julia Kapusta - 2015 - Dissertation, Western University
    In chapter one I firstly critique some contemporary family-resemblance approaches to the category woman, and claim that they do not take sufficient account of dis-semblance, that is, resemblances that people have in common with members of the contrast category man. Second, I analyze how the concept of woman is semantically contestable: resemblance/dissemblance structures give rise to vagueness and to borderline cases. Borderline cases can either be included in the category or excluded from it. The factors which incline parties in a (...)
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  5.  39
    Practice of Cognitive Estrangement.Stephanie Julia Kapusta - 2019 - Tandf: Australasian Philosophical Review 3 (1):90-94.
  6. Misgendering and its Moral Contestability.Kapusta Stephanie - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (3):512-519.
    In this article, I consider the harms inflicted upon transgender persons through “misgendering,” that is, such deployments of gender terms that diminish transgender persons’ selfrespect, limit the discursive resources at their disposal to define their own gender, and cause them microaggressive psychological harms. Such deployments are morally contestable, that is, they can be challenged on ethical or political grounds. Two characterizations of “woman” proposed in the feminist literature are critiqued from this perspective. When we consider what would happen to transgender (...)
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  7.  7
    Rethinking medical invasiveness in the clinical encounter.Stephanie K. Slack & Nathan Higgins - 2024 - Journal of Medical Ethics 50 (4):234-235.
    De Marco et al 1 argue that the standard account of medical ‘invasiveness’ (as ‘incision’ or ‘insertion’) fails to capture three aspects of its existing use, namely that invasiveness can come in degrees, often depends on features of alternative medical interventions and can be non-physical. They propose a new schematic account that suggests that medical interventions can possess ‘basic invasiveness’ (which can come in degrees and of which they suggest at least two types: physical and mental), and ‘threshold invasiveness’ which (...)
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  8.  22
    Karl jaspers'project of psychopathology (Karla jaspersa projekt psychopatologii).Kapusta Andrzej - 2010 - Studia Philosophiae Christianae 46 (2):105-128.
  9.  27
    Style in Art.Stephanie Ross - 2003 - In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), The Oxford handbook of aesthetics. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 228.
  10. Group Duties: Their Existence and Their Implications for Individuals.Stephanie Collins - 2019 - Oxford University Press.
    Moral duties are regularly attributed to groups. Does this make conceptual sense or is this merely political rhetoric? And what are the implications for these individuals within groups? Collins outlines a Tripartite Model of group duties that can target political demands at the right entities, in the right way and for the right reasons.
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  11.  8
    Seeking the sacred: transforming our view of ourselves and one another.Stephanie Dowrick - 2011 - New York: Jeremy P. Tarcher/Penguin.
    Argues that positive changes in perspective and deeper spiritual connections to things greater than oneself can influence the world for the better.
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  12.  8
    Adaptable robots, ethics, and trust: a qualitative and philosophical exploration of the individual experience of trustworthy AI.Stephanie Sheir, Arianna Manzini, Helen Smith & Jonathan Ives - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-14.
    Much has been written about the need for trustworthy artificial intelligence (AI), but the underlying meaning of trust and trustworthiness can vary or be used in confusing ways. It is not always clear whether individuals are speaking of a technology’s trustworthiness, a developer’s trustworthiness, or simply of gaining the trust of users by any means. In sociotechnical circles, trustworthiness is often used as a proxy for ‘the good’, illustrating the moral heights to which technologies and developers ought to aspire, at (...)
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  13.  57
    Dharma rain: sources of Buddhist environmentalism.Stephanie Kaza & Kenneth Kraft (eds.) - 2000 - Boston, Mass.: Shambhala Publications.
    A comprehensive collection of classic texts, contemporary interpretations, guidelines for activists, issue-specific information, and materials for environmentally-oriented religious practice. Sources and contributors include Basho, the Dalai Lama, Thich Nhat Hanh, Gary Snyder, Chogyam Trungpa, Gretel Ehrlich, Peter Mathiessen, Helen Tworkov (editor of Tricycle ), and Philip Glass.
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  14. International relations theory and the Third World.Stephanie G. Neuman (ed.) - 1998 - New York: St. Martin's Press.
    In this collected volume, the authors analyze the deficiencies of existing theory and present alternate explanations of Third World foreign policy behavior. The essays show how examining Third World experience can broaden our understanding of how and why states and non-state actors interact in the international system.
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  15.  9
    Interpreting ‘What One Would Have Wanted’.Stephanie Beardman - forthcoming - Journal of Applied Philosophy.
    When making decisions on behalf of someone, is asking what they would have wanted a good way to respect their autonomy? Against prevalent assumptions, I argue that in decisions about the care and treatment of those with advanced dementia, the notion of ‘what one would have wanted’ is conceptually, epistemically, and practically problematic. The problem stems from the disparity between the first-person subjectivity of the past person and that of the present person. The transformative nature of dementia renders the very (...)
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  16. The Core of Care Ethics.Stephanie Collins - 2015 - New York: Palgrave-Macmillan.
    The ethics of care has flourished in recent decades yet we remain without a succinct statement of its core theoretical commitment. This book uses the methods of analytic philosophy to argue for a simple care ethical slogan: dependency relationships generate responsibilities. It uses this slogan to unify, specify and justify the wide range of views found within the care ethical literature.
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  17. Empathy: Its ultimate and proximate bases.Stephanie D. Preston & Frans B. M. de Waal - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):1-20.
    There is disagreement in the literature about the exact nature of the phenomenon of empathy. There are emotional, cognitive, and conditioning views, applying in varying degrees across species. An adequate description of the ultimate and proximate mechanism can integrate these views. Proximately, the perception of an object's state activates the subject's corresponding representations, which in turn activate somatic and autonomic responses. This mechanism supports basic behaviors that are crucial for the reproductive success of animals living in groups. The Perception-Action Model, (...)
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  18.  41
    The origins of probabilistic inference in human infants.Stephanie Denison & Fei Xu - 2014 - Cognition 130 (3):335-347.
  19.  5
    My first picture book about God.Stephanie Jeffs - 2001 - Minneapolis, MN: Augsburg Books. Edited by Roma Samri.
    Young children learn about the power of God's love and creation through simple text and illustrations.
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  20. In Defense of Practical Reasons for Belief.Stephanie Leary - 2017 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 95 (3):529-542.
    Many meta-ethicists are alethists: they claim that practical considerations can constitute normative reasons for action, but not for belief. But the alethist owes us an account of the relevant difference between action and belief, which thereby explains this normative difference. Here, I argue that two salient strategies for discharging this burden fail. According to the first strategy, the relevant difference between action and belief is that truth is the constitutive standard of correctness for belief, but not for action, while according (...)
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  21. Julian Savulescu and Nick Bostrom, eds., Human Enhancement.Stephanie Bauer - 2010 - Ethics 121 (1):218.
     
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  22. Affective Deliberation: Toward a Humean Account of Practical Reasons.Stephanie Beardman - 2000 - Dissertation, Rutgers the State University of New Jersey - New Brunswick
    On a Humean account, a person's reasons for action are determined by her desires---in the broadest sense of 'desires', that is, noncognitive pro-attitudes. In four essays, I defend this account against several prominent objections. The first essay addresses the concern that the Humean cannot account for rationalizing reasons . The next three essays concern justifying reasons : reasons for action that are more fully normative than those that merely make action intelligible. Instrumental reasons, prudential reasons, and intrinsic reasons are three (...)
     
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  23.  17
    Organizations as Wrongdoers: From Ontology to Morality.Stephanie Collins - 2023 - Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press.
    Organizations do moral wrong. States pursue unjust wars, businesses avoid tax, charities misdirect funds. Our social, political, and legal responses require guidance. We need to know what we’re responding to and how we should respond to it. We need a metaphysical and moral theory of wrongful organizations. This book provides a new such theory, paying particular attention to questions that have been underexplored in existing debates. These questions include: where are organizations located as material objects in the natural world? What’s (...)
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  24.  93
    Beyond Consent: Building Trusting Relationships With Diverse Populations in Precision Medicine Research.Stephanie A. Kraft, Mildred K. Cho, Katherine Gillespie, Meghan Halley, Nina Varsava, Kelly E. Ormond, Harold S. Luft, Benjamin S. Wilfond & Sandra Soo-Jin Lee - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (4):3-20.
    With the growth of precision medicine research on health data and biospecimens, research institutions will need to build and maintain long-term, trusting relationships with patient-participants. While trust is important for all research relationships, the longitudinal nature of precision medicine research raises particular challenges for facilitating trust when the specifics of future studies are unknown. Based on focus groups with racially and ethnically diverse patients, we describe several factors that influence patient trust and potential institutional approaches to building trustworthiness. Drawing on (...)
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  25. The Epistemic Risk in Representation.Stephanie Harvard & Eric Winsberg - 2022 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 32 (1):1-31.
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  26.  12
    How Involved Is Involved Fathering?: An Exploration of the Contemporary Culture of Fatherhood.Stephanie Arnold & Glenda Wall - 2007 - Gender and Society 21 (4):508-527.
    While popular cultural representations portray the “new father” of the past two decades as more involved, more nurturing, and capable of coparenting, many argue that actual fathering conduct has not kept pace. Others, however, question the extent to which the culture of fatherhood does indeed support involved fathering and, if so, what this involvement entails. This study aims to contribute to the exploration of the culture of fatherhood through an analysis of a yearlong Canadian newspaper series dedicated to family issues. (...)
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  27. Non-naturalism and Normative Necessities.Stephanie Leary - 2017 - Oxford Studies in Metaethics 12.
    This chapter argues that the best way for a non-naturalist to explain why the normative supervenes on the natural is to claim that, while there are some sui generis normative properties whose essences cannot be fully specified in non-normative terms and do not specify any non-normative sufficient conditions for their instantiation, there are certain hybrid normative properties whose essences specify both naturalistic sufficient conditions for their own instantiation and sufficient conditions for the instantiation of certain sui generis normative properties. This (...)
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  28. The Transfer of Duties: From Individuals to States and Back Again.Stephanie Collins & Holly Lawford-Smith - 2016 - In Michael Brady & Miranda Fricker (eds.), The Epistemic Life of Groups. Oxford University Press. pp. 150-172.
    Individuals sometimes pass their duties on to collectives, which is one way in which collectives can come to have duties. The collective discharges its duties by acting through its members, which involves distributing duties back out to individuals. Individuals put duties in and get (transformed) duties out. In this paper we consider whether (and if so, to what extent) this general account can make sense of states' duties. Do some of the duties we typically take states to have come from (...)
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  29. The Many Faces of Empathy: Parsing Emathic Phenomena through a Proximate, Dynamic-Systems View Reprsenting the Other in the Self.Stephanie D. Preston & Alicia J. Hofelich - 2012 - Emotion Review 4 (1):24-33.
    A surfeit of research confirms that people activate personal, affective, and conceptual representations when perceiving the states of others. However, researchers continue to debate the role of self–other overlap in empathy due to a failure to dissociate neural overlap, subjective resonance, and personal distress. A perception–action view posits that neural-level overlap is necessary during early processing for all social understanding, but need not be conscious or aversive. This neural overlap can subsequently produce a variety of states depending on the context (...)
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  30.  15
    Think Pragmatically: Investigators’ Obligations to Patient-Subjects When Research is Embedded in Care.Stephanie R. Morain & Emily A. Largent - 2022 - American Journal of Bioethics 23 (8):10-21.
    Growing interest in embedded research approaches—where research is incorporated into clinical care—has spurred numerous studies to generate knowledge relevant to the real-world needs of patients and other stakeholders. However, it also has presented ethical challenges. An emerging challenge is how to understand the nature and extent of investigators’ obligations to patient-subjects. Prior scholarship on investigator duties has generally been grounded upon the premise that research and clinical care are distinct activities, bearing distinct duties. Yet this premise—and its corresponding implications—are challenged (...)
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  31.  50
    Promoting virtual, informal learning now to thrive in a post‐pandemic world.Stephanie Zajac, Jason Randall & Courtney Holladay - 2022 - Business and Society Review 127 (S1):283-298.
    Business and Society Review, Volume 127, Issue S1, Page 283-298, Spring 2022.
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  32.  53
    Three-year-old children's reasoning about possibilities.Stephanie Alderete & Fei Xu - 2023 - Cognition 237 (C):105472.
  33.  31
    A Social-Ecological Framework of Theory, Assessment, and Prevention of Suicide.Robert J. Cramer & Nestor D. Kapusta - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  34.  32
    A Framework for Unrestricted Prenatal Whole-Genome Sequencing: Respecting and Enhancing the Autonomy of Prospective Parents.Stephanie C. Chen & David T. Wasserman - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (1):3-18.
    Noninvasive, prenatal whole genome sequencing may be a technological reality in the near future, making available a vast array of genetic information early in pregnancy at no risk to the fetus or mother. Many worry that the timing, safety, and ease of the test will lead to informational overload and reproductive consumerism. The prevailing response among commentators has been to restrict conditions eligible for testing based on medical severity, which imposes disputed value judgments and devalues those living with eligible conditions. (...)
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  35.  30
    Of Models and Machines: Implementing Bounded Rationality.Stephanie Dick - 2015 - Isis 106 (3):623-634.
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  36.  39
    When Is It Ethical for Physician-Investigators to Seek Consent From Their Own Patients?Stephanie R. Morain, Steven Joffe & Emily A. Largent - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (4):11-18.
    Classic statements of research ethics advise against permitting physician-investigators to obtain consent for research participation from patients with whom they have preexisting treatment relationships. Reluctance about “dual-role” consent reflects the view that distinct normative commitments govern physician–patient and investigator–participant relationships, and that blurring the research–care boundary could lead to ethical transgressions. However, several features of contemporary research demand reconsideration of the ethics of dual-role consent. Here, we examine three arguments advanced against dual-role consent: that it creates role conflict for the (...)
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  37.  44
    Presumed Consent for Pelvic Exams Under Anesthesia Is Medical Sexual Assault.Stephanie Tillman - 2023 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 16 (1):1-20.
    Unconsented pelvic exams under anesthesia are assaults cloaked in defense of healthcare education. Preemptive linguistic qualifiers “presumed” or “implied” attempt to justify such violations with flippancy toward their oxymoronic implications: to suggest a priori that consent can be assumed undermines its otherwise standalone social, ethical, and medico-legal reverence. In this paper I conceptualize “medical sexual assault” and argue that presumed consent for intimate exams exemplifies its definition. By bluntly describing pelvic exams as “penetration,” this work aims to reify the intimate (...)
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  38. Beyond Individualism.Stephanie Collins - 2019 - In Effective Altruism: Philosophical Issues.
    In this chapter, Stephanie Collins examines the idea that individuals can acquire ‘membership duties’ as a result of being members of a group that itself bears duties. In particular, powerful and wealthy states are duty-bearing groups, and their citizens have derivative membership duties (for example, to contribute to putting right wrongs that have been done in the past by the group in question, and to increase the extent to which the group fulfils its duties). In addition, she argues, individuals (...)
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  39.  14
    The Aesthetic Use of the Logical Functions in Kant's Third Critique.Stephanie Adair - 2018 - Boston: De Gruyter.
    In the third Critique Kant details an aesthetic operation of judgment that is surprising considering how judgment functioned in the first Critique. In this book, I defend an understanding of Kant’s theory of Geschmacksurteil as detailing an operation of the faculties that does not violate the cognitive structure laid out in the first Critique. My orientation is primarily epistemological, elaborating the determinations that govern the activity of pure aesthetic judging that specify it as a "bestimmte" type of judgment without transforming (...)
  40. Australian University Students' Attitudes Towards the Acceptability and Regulation of Pharmaceuticals to Improve Academic Performance.Stephanie Bell, Brad Partridge, Jayne Lucke & Wayne Hall - 2012 - Neuroethics 6 (1):197-205.
    There is currently little empirical information about attitudes towards cognitive enhancement - the use of pharmaceutical drugs to enhance normal brain functioning. It is claimed this behaviour most commonly occurs in students to aid studying. We undertook a qualitative assessment of attitudes towards cognitive enhancement by conducting 19 semi-structured interviews with Australian university students. Most students considered cognitive enhancement to be unacceptable, in part because they believed it to be unethical but there was a lack of consensus on whether it (...)
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  41.  93
    Collective Responsibility Gaps.Stephanie Collins - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 154 (4):943-954.
    Which kinds of responsibility can we attribute to which kinds of collective, and why? In contrast, which kinds of collective responsibility can we not attribute—which kinds are ‘gappy’? This study provides a framework for answering these questions. It begins by distinguishing between three kinds of collective and three kinds of responsibility. It then explains how gaps—i.e. cases where we cannot attribute the responsibility we might want to—appear to arise within each type of collective responsibility. It argues some of these gaps (...)
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  42.  10
    A Responsive Approach to Organizational Misconduct.Stephanie Bertels, Michael Cody & Simon Pek - 2014 - Business Ethics Quarterly 24 (3):343-370.
    In this article, we examine how regulators, prosecutors, and courts might support and encourage the efforts of organizations to not only reintegrate after misconduct but also to improve their conduct in a way that reduces their likelihood of re-offense (rehabilitation). We explore a novel experiment in creative sentencing in Alberta Canada that aimed to try to change the behaviour of an industry by publicly airing the root causes of a failure of one the industry’s leaders. Drawing on this case and (...)
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  43.  34
    Individual differences in children’s mathematical competence are related to the intentional but not automatic processing of Arabic numerals.Stephanie Bugden & Daniel Ansari - 2011 - Cognition 118 (1):32-44.
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  44. We the People: Is the Polity the State?Stephanie Collins & Holly Lawford-Smith - 2021 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 7 (1):78-97.
    When a liberal-democratic state signs a treaty or wages a war, does its whole polity do those things? In this article, we approach this question via the recent social ontological literature on collective agency. We provide arguments that it does and that it does not. The arguments are presented via three considerations: the polity's control over what the state does; the polity's unity; and the influence of individual polity members. We suggest that the answer to our question differs for different (...)
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  45. Interconnected Blameworthiness.Stephanie Collins & Niels de Haan - 2021 - The Monist 104 (2):195-209.
    This paper investigates agents’ blameworthiness when they are part of a group that does harm. We analyse three factors that affect the scope of an agent’s blameworthiness in these cases: shared intentionality, interpersonal influence, and common knowledge. Each factor involves circumstantial luck. The more each factor is present, the greater is the scope of each agent’s vicarious blameworthiness for the other agents’ contributions to the harm. We then consider an agent’s degree of blameworthiness, as distinct from her scope of blameworthiness. (...)
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  46.  75
    The choice between current and retrospective evaluations of pain.Stephanie Beardman - 2000 - Philosophical Psychology 3 (1):97-110.
    Daniel Kahneman and his colleagues have made an interesting discovery about people's preferences. In several experiments, subjects underwent two separate ordeals of pain, identical except that one ended with an added amount of diminishing pain. When asked to evaluate these episodes after experiencing both, subjects generally preferred the longer episode--even though it had a greater objective quantity of pain. These data raise an ethical question about whether to respect such preferences when acting on another's behalf. John Broome thinks that it (...)
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  47.  70
    First-person disavowals of digital phenotyping and epistemic injustice in psychiatry.Stephanie K. Slack & Linda Barclay - 2023 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 26 (4):605-614.
    Digital phenotyping will potentially enable earlier detection and prediction of mental illness by monitoring human interaction with and through digital devices. Notwithstanding its promises, it is certain that a person’s digital phenotype will at times be at odds with their first-person testimony of their psychological states. In this paper, we argue that there are features of digital phenotyping in the context of psychiatry which have the potential to exacerbate the tendency to dismiss patients’ testimony and treatment preferences, which can be (...)
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  48. Femmes refugiees palestiniennes.Stephanie Latte Abdallah - 2006
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  49. Green coffee, green consumers : green philosophy?Stephanie W. Aleman - 2011 - In Scott F. Parker & Michael W. Austin (eds.), Coffee - Philosophy for Everyone: Grounds for Debate. Wiley-Blackwell.
     
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  50. Fetishized meat: Asserting power over animals.Stephanie Cram - 2009 - Gnosis 10 (3):1-8.
     
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