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Karen Green
University of Melbourne
  1.  51
    A History of Women's Political Thought in Europe, 1400–1700.Jacqueline Broad & Karen Green - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    This ground-breaking book surveys the history of women's political thought in Europe from the late medieval period to the early modern era. The authors examine women's ideas about topics such as the basis of political authority, the best form of political organisation, justifications of obedience and resistance, and concepts of liberty, toleration, sociability, equality, and self-preservation. Women's ideas concerning relations between the sexes are discussed in tandem with their broader political outlooks; and the authors demonstrate that the development of a (...)
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  2.  16
    Catharine Macaulay’s Enlightenment Faith and Radical Politics.Karen Green - 2018 - History of European Ideas 44 (1):35-48.
    The disappearance of Catharine Macaulay’s eighteenth-century defense of the doctrines that justified the seventeeth-century republican parliament, has served to obscure an important strand of enlightenment faith, that was active in the lead up to the American and French Revolutions, and that also played a significant role in the history of feminism. This faith was made up of two intertwined strands, ‘Christian eudaimonism’ and ‘rational altruism’. Dominant contemporary accounts of the origins of republicanism and democratic theory during the eighteenth-century have excluded (...)
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  3.  18
    A History of Women's Political Thought in Europe, 1700–1800.Karen Green - 2014 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    During the eighteenth century, elite women participated in the philosophical, scientific, and political controversies that resulted in the overthrow of monarchy, the reconceptualisation of marriage, and the emergence of modern, democratic institutions. In this comprehensive study, Karen Green outlines and discusses the ideas and arguments of these women, exploring the development of their distinctive and contrasting political positions, and their engagement with the works of political thinkers such as Hobbes, Locke, Mandeville and Rousseau. Her exploration ranges across Europe from England (...)
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  4.  35
    On Some Footnotes to Catharine Trotter Cockburn’s Defence of the Essay Of Human Understanding.Karen Green - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 27 (4):824-841.
    ABSTRACTTwo footnotes added to the version of Catharine Cockburn’s Defence of the Essay Of Human Understanding reprinted in her Works have led to various accusations, including that s...
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  5.  12
    The Rights of Woman and the Equal Rights of Men.Karen Green - 2021 - Political Theory 49 (3):403-430.
    While standard histories of Western political thought represent women’s rights as an offshoot of the earlier movement for the equal rights of men, this essay argues that the eighteenth-century push for democracy and equal rights was grounded in arguments first used to defend women’s right to moral and religious self-determination, based on their rational and spiritual equality with men. In tandem with the rise of critiques of absolute monarchy, ideal marriage, which had previously involved lordship and subjection, was transformed into (...)
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  6. Davidson's Derangement: Of the Conceptual Priority of Language.Karen Green - 2001 - Dialectica 55 (3):239-258.
    Davidson has argued that the phenomenon of malapropism shows that languages thought of as social entities cannot be prior in the account of communication. This may be taken to imply that Dummett's belief, that language is prior in the account of thought, cannot be retained. This paper criticises the argument that takes Davidson from malapropism to the denial of the priority of language in the account of communication. It argues, against Davidson, that the distinction between word meaning and what speakers (...)
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  7.  20
    Indicating a Translation for ‘Bedeutung’.Karen Green - 2019 - History and Philosophy of Logic 41 (2):114-127.
    The translation of both ‘bedeuten’ and ‘Bedeutung’ in Frege's works remains sufficiently problematic that some contemporary authors prefer to leave these words untranslated. Here a case is made for returning to Russell's initial choice of ‘to indicate’ and ‘indication’ as better alternatives than the more usual ‘meaning’, ‘reference’, or ‘denotation’. It is argued that this choice has the philosophical payoff that Frege's controversial doctrines concerning the semantic values of sentences and predicative expressions are rendered far more comprehensible by it, and (...)
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  8.  49
    Dummett: Philosophy of Language.Karen Green - 2001 - Polity Press.
    Dummett's output has been prolific and highly influential, but not always as accessible as it deserves to be. This book sets out to rectify this situation.
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  9.  35
    A Moral Philosophy of Their Own? The Moral and Political Thought of Eighteenth-Century British Women.Karen Green - 2015 - The Monist 98 (1):89-101.
    Despite the fact that the High-Church Tory, Mary Astell, held political views diametrically opposed to the Whiggish Catharine Trotter Cockburn and Catharine Macaulay, it is here argued that their metaethical views were surprisingly similar. All were influenced by a blend of Christian universalism and Aristotelian eudaimonism, which accepted the existence of a law of nature, that we strive for happiness, and that happiness results from living in accord with our God-given nature. They differed with regard to epistemological issues; the means (...)
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  10. Virtue Ethics and the Origins of Feminism: The Case of Christine de Pizan.Karen Green - 2019 - In Marcy P. Lascano & Eileen O'Neill (eds.), Feminist History of Philosophy: the Recovery and Evaluation of Women’s Philosophical Thought. Dordrecht, Netherlands: pp. 261–79.
    This paper argues that modern virtue ethics provides a useful background against which to read the philosophical import of Christine de Pizan’s works. By recognizing the origins of much of her thought in the Medieval tradition of virtue ethics, the paper brings out the continuity between her writing and a rich stream of contemporary ethical debate. It shows how Christine’s strand of feminism was deeply indebted to Medieval virtue ethics; both as found in Boethius and in contemporary compilations on the (...)
     
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  11.  3
    The Woman of Reason: Feminism, Humanism and Political Thought.Karen Green - 1995 - Polity/Continuum.
    This is a timely re-appraisal of feminist political thinkers and their male contemporaries, providing a re-evaluation of feminist humanism.
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  12.  24
    Liberty and Virtue in Catherine Macaulay's Enlightenment Philosophy.Karen Green - 2012 - Intellectual History Review 22 (3):411-426.
  13.  13
    Two Distinctions in Environmental Goodness.Karen Green - 1996 - Environmental Values 5 (1):31 - 46.
    In her paper, 'Two distinctions in goodness', Korsgaard points out that while a contrast is often drawn between intrinsic and instrumental value there are really two distinctions to be drawn here. One is the distinction between intrinsic and extrinsic value, the other is that between having value as an end and having value as a means. In this paper I apply this contrast to some issues in environmental philosophy. It has become a commonplace of environmentalism that there are intrinsic values (...)
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  14. Frege on Existence and Non‐Existence.Karen Green - 2015 - Theoria 81 (4):293-310.
    Despite its importance for early analytic philosophy, Gottlob Frege's account of existence statements, according to which they classify concepts, has been thought to succumb to a number of well-worn criticisms. This article does two things. First, it argues that, by remaining faithful to the letter of Frege's claim that concepts are functions, the Fregean account can be saved from many of the standard criticisms. Second, it examines the problem that Frege's account fails to generalize to cases which involve definite descriptions (...)
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  15. When is a Contract Theorist Not a Contract Theorist? Mary Astell and Catharine Macaulay as Critics of Thomas Hobbes.Karen Green - 2012 - In Nancy Hirschmann Joanne Wright (ed.), Feminist Interpretations of Thomas Hobbes. Penn State. pp. 169-89.
    Although Catharine Macaulay was a contract theorist and early feminist her philosophy is not based on a concept of liberty like that of Hobbes, but on a notion of individual liberty as self government close to that accepted by Mary Astell. This raises the question of whether criticisms of liberal feminism which assume that it is rooted in Hobbes's suspect notion of freedom and consent may miss there mark.
     
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  16.  62
    Rawls, Women and the Priority of Liberty.Karen Green - 1986 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 64 (S1):26-36.
  17.  25
    Brain Writing and Derrida.Karen Green - 1993 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 71 (3):238 – 255.
    An approach to Derrida's différance from the perspective of analytic philosophy of language which attempts to show both how many of Derrida's insights are influenced by analytic philosophy of language and can be related to ideas found in Quine, Wittgenstein, and Dennett, but which ultimately concludes that the linguistic idealism that he promotes is incoherent.
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  18. A Pinch of Salt for Frege.Karen Green - 2006 - Synthese 150 (2):209-228.
    Michael Dummett has argued that a formal semantics for our language is inadequate unless it can be shown to illuminate to our actual practice of speaking and understanding. This paper argues that Frege’s account of the semantics of predicate expressions according to which the reference of a predicate is a concept (a function from objects to truth values) has exactly the required characteristics. The first part of the paper develops a model for understanding the distinction between objects and concepts as (...)
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  19. Catharine Macaulay as Critic of Hume.Karen Green - 2018 - In Geoff Boucher & Henry Martyn Lloyd (eds.), Rethinking the Enlightenment. Lanham, MD 20706, USA: pp. 113-130.
    Catharine Macaulay’s The History of England challenges Hume’s interpretation of the history of the Stuarts, as developed in his The History of Great Britain, and is grounded in meta-ethical, religious, and political principles that are also fundamentally opposed to those developed by Hume, as she makes clear in her Treatise on the Immutabilty of Moral Truth. Here it is argued that the contrast between them poses a problem for a number of recent accounts of the enlightenment period, and that Macaulay’s (...)
     
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  20.  28
    Reason and Feeling: Resisting the Dichotomy.Karen Green - 1993 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 71 (4):385 – 399.
    It is argued that it is not enough for feminist standpoint theory to argue that a feminine standpoint is better than a masculine one because of its genesis in female psycho-sexuality, it needs to show that its content is actually objectively more accurate. It then argues that historical feminists, such as Mary Wollstonecraft, have in fact tended to adopt a justice perspective, grounded in reason, which is objectively of greater value than that developed by many male authors, because these historical (...)
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  21.  79
    The Passions and the Imagination in Wollstonecraft's Theory of Moral Judgement.Karen Green - 1997 - Utilitas 9 (3):271.
    According to Wollstonecraft. This suggests that for her ethical judgement is based on reason, and so she is an ethical cognitivist. This impression is upheld by the fact that she clearly believes in the existence of ethical truth and has little sympathy with subjectivism. At the same time, she places a great deal of importance on the role of the emotions in ethical judgement. This raises the question how the emotions can be relevant if ethics consists in a realm of (...)
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  22. Parity and Procedural Justice.Karen Green - 2006 - Essays in Philosophy 7 (1):4.
    In this paper I briefly set out Susan Moller Okin’s liberal feminist position and then rehearse a number of criticisms of Okin which together suggest that dismantling the gender system and adopting the principle of androgyny would not be compatible with liberalism. This incompatibility appears to vindicate an extreme feminist critique of liberalism. I argue that nevertheless a liberal feminism is possible. The liberal feminist ought to adopt the principle of parity, that is, guaranteed equal representation of both sexes in (...)
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  23.  50
    A Plague on Both Your Houses.Karen Green - 1999 - The Monist 82 (2):278-303.
    Objections are raised to the demand that one be either exclusively for or against continental philosophy, and two arguments are developed; one in support of, and one against, positions developed within the continental tradition. The first is a quick argument against A.J. Ayer’s rejection, on the basis of Frege’s logical insights, of Heidegger and Sartre’s use of ‘nothing’. The second is a longer argument against Derrida’s claim, on the basis of his critique of Husserl’s phenomenology, that the difference between signifier (...)
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  24. Locke, Enlightenment, and Liberty in the Works of Catharine Macaulay and Her Contemporaries.Karen Green - 2017 - In Jacqueline Broad & Karen Detlefsen (eds.), Women and Liberty, 1600-1800. Oxford, UK: pp. 82-94.
    In this paper I explore the connection between Catharine Macaulay’s views on freedom of the will and her promotion of the cause of political liberty and show that the position she develops has its origins in Locke’s philosophy. I argue for the existence of a distinctive ‘Lockean’ conception of political liberty, which is grounded in an account of moral agency, and which does not fit very well into contemporary characterizations of negative, republican, or positive liberty. I demonstrate that this concept (...)
     
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  25.  53
    Is a Logic for Belief Sentences Possible?Karen Green - 1985 - Philosophical Studies 47 (1):29 - 55.
    In this paper I distinguish normative and descriptive reasons for attempting to construct a logic for belief sentences, and argue that because the interpretation of the content of an attribution of belief is context sensitive and ambiguous, no simple logic is adequate.
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  26.  34
    Australian Women Philosophers.Karen Green - 2011 - In Graham Oppy (ed.), The Antipodean Philosopher, vol. 1. pp. 67–97.
    History of women philosophers in Australia delivered as part of a series of of lectures on many aspects of philosophy in Australia.
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  27.  5
    On E.E. Constance Jones’s Account of Categorical Propositions and Her Defence of Frege.Karen Green - forthcoming - Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-13.
    E.E.C. Jones’s early logical writings have recently been rescued from obscurity and it has been claimed that, in her works dating from the 1890s, she anticipated Frege’s distinction between sense and reference. This claim is challenged on the ground that it is based on a common but inadequate reading of Frege, which runs together his concept/object and sense/reference distinctions. It is admitted that a case can be made for Jones having anticipated something very like Frege’s analysis of categorical propositions, and (...)
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  28. Will the Real Enlightenment Historian Please Stand Up? Catharine Macaulay Versus David Hume.Karen Green - 2011 - In Stephen Buckle Craig Taylor (ed.), Hume and the Enlightenment. Pickering & Chatto.
    Argues that on an interpretation of the Enlightenment which emphasises its radical potential and importance for the development of democracy Catharine Macaulay should be recognised as a more centrally Enlightenment historian than David Hume.
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  29.  29
    Does Science Persecute Women? The Case of the 16th–17th Century Witch-Hunts.Karen Green & John Bigelow - 1998 - Philosophy 73 (2):195-217.
    I. Logic, rationality and ideology Herbert Marcuse once claimed that the ‘“rational” is a mode of thought and action which is geared to reduce ignorance, destruction, brutality, and oppression.’ He echoed a widespread folk belief that a world in which people were rational would be a better world. This could be taken as an optimistic empirical conjecture: if people were more rational then probably the world would be a better place (a trust that ‘virtue will be rewarded’, so to speak). (...)
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  30.  11
    Catharine Macaulay on the Will.Karen Green & Shannon Weekes - 2013 - History of European Ideas 39 (3):409-425.
    Catharine Macaulay's discussion of freedom of the will in her Treatise on the Immutability of Moral Truth has received little attention, and what discussion there is attributes a number of different, incompatible views to her. In this paper the account of the nature of freedom of the will that she develops is related to her political aspirations, and the metaphysical position that she adopts is compared to those of John Locke, Samuel Clarke, Joseph Priestley, William Godwin, and others. It is (...)
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  31. The Context Principle and Dummett's Argument for Anti-Realism.Karen Green - 2005 - Theoria 71 (2):92-117.
    Dummettian anti-realism–the refusal to endorse bivalence–is generally thought to be associated with idealism This paper argues that this is only true of the position developed by early Dummett. In a later manifestation Dummettian anti-realism is better thought of as providing the logic for anti-realisms of an error theoretic kind. Early on Dummett distinguished deep from shallow arguments for giving up bivalence: deep arguments followed a strong ‘sufficiency’ reading of Frege’s context principle, and made the sentence the primary vehicle of meaning. (...)
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  32.  89
    Distance, Divided Responsibility and Universalizability.Karen Green - 2003 - The Monist 86 (3):501-515.
    Peter Singer is responsible for having developed a powerful argument that apparently shows that most of us are far more immoral than we take ourselves to be. Many people follow a minimalist morality. They avoid killing, stealing, lying and cruelty, but feel no obligation to devote themselves to the well-being of everybody else. If we are unstintingly generous, constantly kind or untiring advocates for the prevention of cruelty, we take it that we are doing more morally than is strictly required. (...)
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  33. Was Searle's Descriptivism Refuted?Karen Green - 1998 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 17 (1):109-13.
    It is generally thought that Searle 's cluster theory of the sense of a proper name was soundly refuted by Kripke in Naming and Necessity. This paper challenges this widespread belief and argues that the observations made by Kripke do not show that Searle 's version of descriptivism is false. Indeed, charitably interpreted, Searle 's theory retains considerable plausibility.
     
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  34.  6
    Sense, Reference and Contemporary Predicativism.Karen Green - 2022 - Semiotica 245 (245):99-123.
    Contributing to the debate between referentialist and predicativist accounts of the semantics of proper names, this paper partly endorses a recent trend to reject unitary accounts of their semantics. It does so by restoring a Fregean version of the variety of use account. It criticizes alternative variety of use accounts for not clearly distinguishing pragmatic, syntactic, and semantic issues and argues that, once these are distinguished, the necessity of accepting that names have a variety of uses, and are sometimes logical (...)
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  35.  55
    On the Error of Treating Functions as Objects.Karen Green - 2016 - Analysis and Metaphysics 15:20–35.
    In his late fragment, ‘Sources of Knowledge of Mathematics and Natural Sciences’ Frege laments the tendency to confuse functions with objects and says, ‘It is here that the tendency of language by its use of the definite article to stamp as an object what is a function and hence a non-object, proves itself to be the source of inaccurate and misleading expressions and also of errors of thought. Probably most of the impurities that contaminate the logical source of knowledge have (...)
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  36.  41
    Women's Writing and the Early Modern Genre Wars.Karen Green - 2013 - Hypatia 28 (3):499-515.
    This paper explores two phases of the early modern genre wars. The first was fought by Marie de Gournay, in her “Preface” to Montaigne's Essays, on behalf of her adoptive father and in defense of his naked and masculine prose. The second was fought half a century later by Nicholas Boileau in opposition to Gournay's feminizing successor, Madeleine de Scudéry. In this debate Gournay's position is egalitarian, whereas Scudéry's approximates to a feminism of difference. It is claimed that both female (...)
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  37.  58
    Freud, Wollstonecraft, and Ecofeminism.Karen Green - 1994 - Environmental Ethics 16 (2):117-134.
    I examine recent arguments to the effect that there are significant logical, conceptual, historical, or psychosexual connections between the subordination of women and the subordination of nature and argue that they are all problematic. Although there are important connections between women’s emancipation and the achievement of important environmental goals, they are practical connections rather than conceptual ones.
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  38.  67
    Was Wittgenstein Frege's Heir?Karen Green - 1999 - Philosophical Quarterly 49 (196):289-308.
    This paper argues that Dummett’s interpretation of the relationship between Frege’s anti-psychologism and Wittgenstein’s doctrine that meaning is use results in a misreading of Frege. It points out that anti-mentalism is a form of anti-psychologism, but that mentalism is not the only version of psycholgism. Thus, while Frege and Wittgenstein are united in their opposition to mentalism, they are not equally opposed to psychologism, and from Frege’s point of view, the doctrine that meaning is use could also imply a version (...)
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  39.  7
    Restoring Catharine Macaulay’s Enlightenment Republicanism?Karen Green - 2021 - Dialogue and Universalism 31 (3):39–57.
    Can Catharine Macaulay’s enlightenment, democratic, republicanism be justified from the point of view of contemporary naturalism? Naturalist accounts of political authority tend to be realist and pessimistic, foreclosing the possibility of enlightenment. Macaulay’s utopian political philosophy relies on belief in a good God, whose existence underpins the possibility of moral and political progress. This paper attempts a restoration of her optimistic utopianism, in a reconciliation, grounded in a revision of natural law, of naturalist and utopian attitudes to political theory. It (...)
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  40. Sister Prudence Allen, The Concept of Woman, Vol. II. The Early Humanist Reformation 1250-1500. [REVIEW]Karen Green - 2003 - Philosophy in Review 23 (5):313-316.
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  41.  38
    Christine de Pisan and Thomas Hobbes.Karen Green - 1994 - Philosophical Quarterly 44 (177):456-475.
  42.  34
    Psychologism and Anti-Realism.Karen Green - 1986 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 64 (4):488 – 500.
  43. The Other as Another Other.Karen Green - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (4):1-15.
    : De Beauvoir and Irigaray are archetypes of two opposed feminisms: egalitarian feminism and radical feminism of difference. Yet a filiation exists between de Beauvoir's claim, that women is Other, and Irigaray's Speculum of the Other Woman. This paper explores the relationship between de Beauvoir's and Irigaray's notion of otherness. It argues that Irigaray deforms de Beauvoir's categories, and that de Beauvoir provides a more coherent prospect for the development of an authentic feminine subjectivity.
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  44. What Were the Ladies in the City of Ladies Reading? The Libraries of Christine de Pizan’s Contemporaries.Karen Green - 2010 - Medievalia Et Humanistica 36:77-100.
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  45.  74
    Necessitating Nominalism.Karen Green - 2009 - Acta Analytica 24 (3):193-196.
    It is argued that, if Armstrong is correct and truthmakers necessitate the truths they make true, then the truthmakers must include facts about the meanings of the words used to express those truths, and nominalism apparently results. This conclusion, no doubt unpalatable to Armstrong, is, it is claimed, the result of his having failed to distinguish sufficiently the meanings of words and the properties of things.
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  46.  48
    Women, Hegel, and Recognition in The Second Sex.Karen Green & Nicholas Roffey - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (2):376 - 393.
    This paper develops a new account of Beauvoir's "Hegelianism" and argues that the strand of contemporary interpretation of Beauvoir that seeks to represent her thought in isolation from that of Jean-Paul Sartre constitutes a betrayal of the philosophy of recognition that she denves from Hegel. It underscores the extent to which Beauvoir influenced Sartre's Being and Nothingness and shows that Sartre and Beauvoir both adapted Hegel's ideas and agreed in rejecting his optimism.
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  47.  19
    Catharine Macaulay.Karen Green - 2012 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  48. Marilyn Friedman and Jan Narveson, Political Correctness: For and Against Reviewed By.Karen Green - 1995 - Philosophy in Review 15 (4):241-243.
     
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  49.  10
    Catharine Macaulay and the Concept of “Radical Enlightenment”.Karen Green - 2021 - Intellectual History Review 31 (1):165-180.
    Margaret Jacob and Jonathan Israel have offered somewhat different accounts of what they call the ‘Radical Enlightenment’, that is those elements of enlightenment thought which resulted in the radical political upheavals of the late eighteenth century and the rise of democratic republicanism. Jonathan Israel, in particular, insists that the radical enlightenment was radical both in its secular rejection of all providentialist and teleological metaphysics, as well as radical in its democratic tendencies. This paper looks at the way in which Catharine (...)
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  50.  9
    Freud, Wollstonecraft, and Ecofeminism.Karen Green - 1994 - Environmental Ethics 16 (2):117-134.
    I examine recent arguments to the effect that there are significant logical, conceptual, historical, or psychosexual connections between the subordination of women and the subordination of nature and argue that they are all problematic. Although there are important connections between women’s emancipation and the achievement of important environmental goals, they are practical connections rather than conceptual ones.
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