Results for 'Karen Knight'

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Karen Knight
University of Western Australia
  1.  8
    Book Review Section 1. [REVIEW]Steve Tozer, Kenneth D. Benne, Karen Tice, George R. Knight, Thomas Fleming, Barbara S. Stengel, Evelina Orteza Y. Miranda, George T. Hole, Sharon Bailin & Edward G. Rozycki - 1991 - Educational Studies 22 (3):287-352.
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  2.  14
    The RNA Ontology (RNAO): An Ontology for Integrating RNA Sequence and Structure Data.Robert Hoehndorf, Colin Batchelor, Thomas Bittner, Michel Dumontier, Karen Eilbeck, Rob Knight, Chris J. Mungall, Jane S. Richardson, Jesse Stombaugh & Eric Westhof - 2011 - Applied Ontology 6 (1):53-89.
  3.  20
    Socialising Epistemic Cognition.Simon Knight & Karen Littleton - forthcoming - Educational Research Review.
    We draw on recent accounts of social epistemology to present a novel account of epistemic cognition that is ‘socialised’. In developing this account we foreground the: normative and pragmatic nature of knowledge claims; functional role that ‘to know’ plays when agents say they ‘know x’; the social context in which such claims occur at a macro level, including disciplinary and cultural context; and the communicative context in which such claims occur, the ways in which individuals and small groups express and (...)
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  4.  54
    Limit Computable Integer Parts.Paola D’Aquino, Julia Knight & Karen Lange - 2011 - Archive for Mathematical Logic 50 (7-8):681-695.
    Let R be a real closed field. An integer part I for R is a discretely ordered subring such that for every ${r \in R}$ , there exists an ${i \in I}$ so that i ≤ r < i + 1. Mourgues and Ressayre (J Symb Logic 58:641–647, 1993) showed that every real closed field has an integer part. The procedure of Mourgues and Ressayre appears to be quite complicated. We would like to know whether there is a simple procedure, (...)
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  5.  10
    Epistemology, Assessment, Pedagogy: Where Learning Meets Analytics in the Middle Space.Simon Knight, Simon Buckingham Shum & Karen Littleton - forthcoming - Journal of Learning Analytics.
    Learning Analytics is an emerging research field and design discipline which occupies the ‘middle space’ between the learning sciences/educational research, and the use of computational techniques to capture and analyse data (Suthers and Verbert, 2013). We propose that the literature examining the triadic relationships between epistemology (the nature of knowledge), pedagogy (the nature of learning and teaching) and assessment provide critical considerations for bounding this middle space. We provide examples to illustrate the ways in which the understandings of particular analytics (...)
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  6.  15
    Karen A. Rader; Victoria E. M. Cain. Life on Display: Revolutionizing U.S. Museums of Science and Natural History in the Twentieth Century. Xiv + 467 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. Chicago/London: University of Chicago Press, 2014. $45. [REVIEW]William Knight - 2016 - Isis 107 (1):202-204.
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  7. Welfare Economics and the Welfare State in Historical Perspective.Karen Knight - manuscript
    Although the economic thought of Marshall and Pigou was united by ethical positions broadly considered utilitarian, differences in their intellectual milieu led to degrees of difference between their respective philosophical visions. This change in milieu includes the influence of the little understood period of transition from the early idealist period in Great Britain, which provided the context to Marshall’s intellectual formation, and the late British Idealist period, which provided the context to Pigou’s intellectual formation. During this latter period, the pervading (...)
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  8. The Expedited Removal Study: Report on the First Years of Implementation of Expedited Removal.Karen Musalo, Lauren Gibson, Stephen Knight & J. Taylor - 2001 - Notre Dame Journal of Law, Ethics and Public Policy 15 (2).
     
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  9.  12
    Recognition Memory for Accented and Unaccented Voices.Alvin G. Goldstein, Paul Knight, Karen Bailis & Jerry Conover - 1981 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 17 (5):217-220.
  10.  11
    Erratum To: Limit Computable Integer Parts.Paola D’Aquino, Julia Knight & Karen Lange - 2015 - Archive for Mathematical Logic 54 (3-4):487-489.
  11.  7
    Representing Scott Sets in Algebraic Settings.Alf Dolich, Julia F. Knight, Karen Lange & David Marker - 2015 - Archive for Mathematical Logic 54 (5-6):631-637.
    We prove that for every Scott set S there are S-saturated real closed fields and S-saturated models of Presburger arithmetic.
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  12.  11
    Franciscan Versus Dominican Responses to the Knight as a Societal Model: The Case of the "South English Legendary".Karen Bjelland - 1988 - Franciscan Studies 48 (1):11-27.
  13.  74
    XI. Emotion, Weakness of Will, and the Normative Conception of Agency1: Karen Jones.Karen Jones - 2003 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 52:181-200.
    Empirical work on and common observation of the emotions tells us that our emotions sometimes key us to the presence of real and important reason-giving considerations without necessarily presenting that information to us in a way susceptible of conscious articulation and, sometimes, even despite our consciously held and internally justified judgment that the situation contains no such reasons. In this paper, I want to explore the implications of the fact that emotions show varying degrees of integration with our conscious agency—from (...)
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  14.  41
    Explaining Economic Change: The Interplay Between Cognition and Institutions: Jack Knight and Douglass North.Jack Knight - 1997 - Legal Theory 3 (3):211-226.
    Economic theory is built on assumptions about human behavior—assumptions embodied in rational-choice theory. Underlying these assumptions are implicit notions about how we think and learn. These implicit notions are fundamentally important to social explanation. The very plausibility of the explanations that we develop out of rational-choice theory rests crucially on the accuracy of these notions about cognition and rationality. But there is a basic problem: There is often very little relationship between the assumptions that rational-choice theorists make and the way (...)
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  15. Functions as Selected Effects: The Conceptual Analyst’s Defense.Karen Neander - 1991 - Philosophy of Science 58 (2):168-184.
    In this paper I defend an etiological theory of biological functions (according to which the proper function of a trait is the effect for which it was selected by natural selection) against three objections which have been influential. I argue, contrary to Millikan, that it is wrong to base our defense of the theory on a rejection of conceptual analysis, for conceptual analysis does have an important role in philosophy of science. I also argue that biology requires a normative notion (...)
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  16.  20
    Risk, Uncertainty and Profit.Frank Knight - 1921 - University of Chicago Press.
    Role of the entrepreneur in a distinct role of profit.
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  17. By Frank H. Knight.Frank H. Knight - 1946 - Ethics 57:199.
     
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  18. Why the Exclusion Problem Seems Intractable and How, Just Maybe, to Tract It.Karen Bennett - 2003 - Noûs 37 (3):471-97.
    The basic form of the exclusion problem is by now very, very familiar. 2 Start with the claim that the physical realm is causally complete: every physical thing that happens has a sufficient physical cause. Add in the claim that the mental and the physical are distinct. Toss in some claims about overdetermination, give it a stir, and voilá—suddenly it looks as though the mental never causes anything, at least nothing physical. As it is often put, the physical does all (...)
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  19. Composition, Colocation, and Metaontology.Karen Bennett - 2009 - In David John Chalmers, David Manley & Ryan Wasserman (eds.), Metametaphysics: New Essays on the Foundations of Ontology. Oxford University Press. pp. 38.
    The paper is an extended discussion of what I call the ‘dismissive attitude’ towards metaphysical questions. It has three parts. In the first part, I distinguish three quite different versions of dismissivism. I also argue that there is little reason to think that any of these positions is correct about the discipline of metaphysics as a whole; it is entirely possible that some metaphysical disputes should be dismissed and others should not be. Doing metametaphysics properly requires doing metaphysics first. I (...)
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  20.  37
    Karen Gloy: Was ist die Wirklichkeit?Karen Gloy & Steffen Kluck - 2016 - Philosophischer Literaturanzeiger 69 (2):175-181.
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  21. The Teleological Notion of 'Function'.Karen Neander - 1991 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 69 (4):454 – 468.
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  22. The Power and the Promise of Ecological Feminism.Karen J. Warren - 1990 - Environmental Ethics 12 (2):125-146.
    Ecological feminism is the position that there are important connections-historical, symbolic, theoretical-between the domination of women and the domination of nonhuman nature. I argue that because the conceptual connections between the dual dominations of women and nature are located in an oppressive patriarchal conceptual framework characterized by a logic of domination, (1) the logic of traditional feminism requires the expansion of feminism to include ecological feminism and (2) ecological feminism provides a framework for developing a distinctively feminist environmental ethic. I (...)
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  23. Misrepresenting and Malfunctioning.Karen Neander - 1995 - Philosophical Studies 79 (2):109-41.
  24.  54
    Children's Understanding of Counting.Karen Wynn - 1990 - Cognition 36 (2):155-193.
  25. Ecofeminist Philosophy: A Western Perspective on What It is and Why It Matters.Karen J. Warren - 2000 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    A philosophical exploration of the nature, scope, and significance of ecofeminist theory and practice. This book presents the key issues, concepts, and arguments which motivate and sustain ecofeminism from a western philosophical perspective.
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  26. The Promise and Power of Ecofeminism.Karen J. Warren - 1990 - Environmental Ethics 12 (2):125-46.
    Ecological feminism is the position that there are important connections-historical, symbolic, theoretical-between the domination of women and the domination of nonhuman nature. I argue that because the conceptual connections between the dual dominations of women and nature are located in an oppressive patriarchal conceptual framework characterized by a logic of domination, the logic of traditional feminism requires the expansion of feminism to include ecological feminism and ecological feminism provides a framework for developing a distinctively feminist environmental ethic. I conclude that (...)
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  27. Luck Egalitarianism: Equality, Responsibility, and Justice.Carl Knight - 2009 - Edinburgh University Press.
    How should we decide which inequalities between people are justified, and which are unjustified? One answer is that such inequalities are only justified where there is a corresponding variation in responsible action or choice on the part of the persons concerned. This view, which has become known as 'luck egalitarianism', has come to occupy a central place in recent debates about distributive justice. This book is the first full length treatment of this significant development in contemporary political philosophy. Each of (...)
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  28. Luck Egalitarianism.Carl Knight - 2013 - Philosophy Compass 8 (10):924-934.
    Luck egalitarianism is a family of egalitarian theories of distributive justice that aim to counteract the distributive effects of luck. This article explains luck egalitarianism's main ideas, and the debates that have accompanied its rise to prominence. There are two main parts to the discussion. The first part sets out three key moves in the influential early statements of Dworkin, Arneson, and Cohen: the brute luck/option luck distinction, the specification of brute luck in everyday or theoretical terms and the specification (...)
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  29. Feminism and Ecology: Making Connections.Karen J. Warren - 1987 - Environmental Ethics 9 (1):3-20.
    The current feminist debate over ecology raises important and timely issues about the theoretical adequacy of the four leading versions of feminism-liberal feminism, traditional Marxist feminism, radical feminism, and socialist feminism. In this paper I present a minimal condition account of ecological feminism, or ecofeminism. I argue that if eco-feminism is true or at least plausible, then each of the four leading versions of feminism is inadequate, incomplete, or problematic as a theoretical grounding for eco-feminism. I conclude that, if eco-feminism (...)
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  30.  28
    Force and Freedom: Reflections on World History. By Frank H. Knight.Frank H. Knight - 1943 - Ethics 54 (2):149-150.
  31. Spinoza; 4 Essays, by Land [and Others, Tr. By A. Menzies and Others] Ed. By Prof. Knight.William Angus Knight, Jan Pieter N. Land & Allan Menzies - 1882
     
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  32.  7
    Religion, Science, and Society in the Modern World. By Frank H. Knight[REVIEW]Frank H. Knight - 1943 - Ethics 54:60.
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  33.  26
    Philosophy as Passion: The Thinking of Simone de Beauvoir.Karen Vintges - 1996 - Indiana University Press.
    Indispensable for students of Beauvoir’s philosophy and existentialism, Vintges’s book will prove valuable as well in courses on ethics, postmodernism, and feminist theory." —Ethics "... a highly informative book." —Teaching ...
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  34. Teleological Theories of Mental Content.Karen Neander - 2004 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  35. Solving the Circularity Problem for Functions: A Response to Nanay.Karen Neander & Alex Rosenberg - 2012 - Journal of Philosophy 109 (10):613-622.
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  36.  63
    Aristotelian Philosophy: Ethics and Politics From Aristotle to Macintyre.Kelvin Knight - 2007 - Polity.
    Aristotle is the most influential philosopher of practice, and Knight's new book explores the continuing importance of Aristotelian philosophy. First, it examines the theoretical bases of what Aristotle said about ethical, political and productive activity. It then traces ideas of practice through such figures as St Paul, Luther, Hegel, Heidegger and recent Aristotelian philosophers, and evaluates Alasdair MacIntyre's contribution. Knight argues that, whereas Aristotle's own thought legitimated oppression, MacIntyre's revision of Aristotelianism separates ethical excellence from social elitism and (...)
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  37.  26
    The Psychology of Intelligence.Rex Knight, Jean Piaget, M. Piercy & D. E. Berlyne - 1951 - Philosophical Quarterly 1 (5):470.
    First Published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  38. Emotion, Weakness of Will, and the Normative Conception of Agency.Karen Jones - 2003 - In A. Hatzimoysis (ed.), Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement. Cambridge University Press. pp. 181-200.
    Empirical work on and common observation of the emotions tells us that our emotions sometimes key us to the presence of real and important reason-giving considerations without necessarily presenting that information to us in a way susceptible of conscious articulation and, sometimes, even despite our consciously held and internally justified judgment that the situation contains no such reasons. In this paper, I want to explore the implications of the fact that emotions show varying degrees of integration with our conscious agency—from (...)
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  39. Aggregation and Deliberation: On the Possibility of Democratic Legitimacy.Jack Knight & James Johnson - 1994 - Political Theory 22 (2):277-296.
  40. Explaining Complex Adaptations: A Reply to Sober’s ”Reply to Neander’.Karen Neander - 1995 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 46 (4):583-587.
  41. Moderate Emissions Grandfathering.Carl Knight - 2014 - Environmental Values 23 (5):571-592.
    Emissions grandfathering holds that a history of emissions strengthens an agent’s claim for future emission entitlements. Though grandfathering appears to have been influential in actual emission control frameworks, it is rarely taken seriously by philosophers. This article presents an argument for thinking this an oversight. The core of the argument is that members of countries with higher historical emissions are typically burdened with higher costs when transitioning to a given lower level of emissions. According to several appealing views in political (...)
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  42. Intersectionality and Ameliorative Analyses of Race and Gender.Karen Jones - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 171 (1):99-107.
    This discussion of Sally Haslanger’s recent book, Resisting Reality: Social Construction and Social Critique (Oxford 2012), investigates how her theory of race and gender handles the problem of intersectionality; that is, the problem of how to understand the ways in which one’s location in multiple socially constructed categories affects one’s lived experiences, social roles, and relative privilege or disadvantage. Haslanger defines race and gender as locations within hierarchical social structures. This high-level structural analysis allows her to find commonality without claiming (...)
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  43.  69
    Psychological Foundations of Number: Numerical Competence in Human Infants.Karen Wynn - 1998 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (8):296-303.
  44.  72
    What Does Natural Selection Explain? Correction to Sober.Karen Neander - 1988 - Philosophy of Science 55 (3):422-426.
    In this paper I argue against Sober's claim that natural selection does not explain the traits of individuals. Sober argues that natural selection only explains the distribution of traits in a population. My point is that the explanation of an individual's traits involves us in a description of the individual's ancestry, and in an explanation of the distribution of traits in that ancestral population. Thus Sober is wrong, natural selection is part of the explanation of the traits of individuals.
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  45.  27
    EPIC: A Framework for Using Video Games in Ethics Education.Karen Schrier - 2015 - Journal of Moral Education 44 (4):393-424.
    Ethics education can potentially be supplemented through the use of video games. This article proposes a novel framework, which helps educators choose games to be used for ethics education purposes. The EPIC Framework is derived from a number of classic moral development, learning, and ethical decision-making models, including frameworks and theories associated with games and ethics, as well as prior empirical and theoretical research literature. The EPIC Framework consists of seven ethics education goals, and 12 strategies associated with ethics education, (...)
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  46. Benefiting From Injustice and Brute Luck.Carl Knight - 2013 - Social Theory and Practice 39 (4):581-598.
    Many political philosophers maintain that beneficiaries of injustice are under special obligations to assist victims of injustice. However, the examples favoured by those who endorse this view equally support an alternative luck egalitarian view, which holds that special obligations should be assigned to those with good brute luck. From this perspective the distinguishing features of the benefiting view are (1) its silence on the question of whether to allocate special obligations to assist the brute luck worse off to those who (...)
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  47. Egalitarian Justice and Expected Value.Carl Knight - 2013 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (5):1061-1073.
    According to all-luck egalitarianism, the differential distributive effects of both brute luck, which defines the outcome of risks which are not deliberately taken, and option luck, which defines the outcome of deliberate gambles, are unjust. Exactly how to correct the effects of option luck is, however, a complex issue. This article argues that (a) option luck should be neutralized not just by correcting luck among gamblers, but among the community as a whole, because it would be unfair for gamblers as (...)
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  48. How to Change the Past.Karen Jones - 2008 - In Kim Atkins & Catriona Mackenzie (eds.), Practical Identity and Narrative Agency. Routledge.
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  49.  30
    Abandoning the Abandonment Objection: Luck Egalitarian Arguments for Public Insurance.Carl Knight - 2015 - Res Publica 21 (2):119-135.
    Critics of luck egalitarianism have claimed that, far from providing a justification for the public insurance functions of a welfare state as its proponents claim, the view objectionably abandons those who are deemed responsible for their dire straits. This article considers seven arguments that can be made in response to this ‘abandonment objection’. Four of these arguments are found wanting, with a recurrent problem being their reliance on a dubious sufficientarian or quasi-sufficientarian commitment to provide a threshold of goods unconditionally. (...)
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  50.  20
    Comment by Janie B Butts and Karen L Rich On: `Guilty but Good: Defending Voluntary Active Euthanasia From a Virtue Perspective'.Janie B. Butts & Karen L. Rich - 2008 - Nursing Ethics 15 (4):449-451.
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