72 found
Order:
Disambiguations
Karl J. Friston [39]Karl Friston [33]
  1. The Free-Energy Principle: A Rough Guide to the Brain?Karl Friston - 2009 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (7):293-301.
  2.  76
    From Cognitivism to Autopoiesis: Towards a Computational Framework for the Embodied Mind.Micah Allen & Karl J. Friston - 2018 - Synthese 195 (6):2459-2482.
    Predictive processing approaches to the mind are increasingly popular in the cognitive sciences. This surge of interest is accompanied by a proliferation of philosophical arguments, which seek to either extend or oppose various aspects of the emerging framework. In particular, the question of how to position predictive processing with respect to enactive and embodied cognition has become a topic of intense debate. While these arguments are certainly of valuable scientific and philosophical merit, they risk underestimating the variety of approaches gathered (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   36 citations  
  3. Is the Free-Energy Principle a Formal Theory of Semantics? From Variational Density Dynamics to Neural and Phenotypic Representations.Inês Hipólito, Maxwell Ramstead & Karl Friston - 2020 - Entropy 1 (1):1-30.
    The aim of this paper is twofold: (1) to assess whether the construct of neural representations plays an explanatory role under the variational free-energy principle and its corollary process theory, active inference; and (2) if so, to assess which philosophical stance - in relation to the ontological and epistemological status of representations - is most appropriate. We focus on non-realist (deflationary and fictionalist-instrumentalist) approaches. We consider a deflationary account of mental representation, according to which the explanatorily relevant contents of neural (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  4. Predictive Coding Explains Binocular Rivalry: An Epistemological Review.Jakob Hohwy, Andreas Roepstorff & Karl Friston - 2008 - Cognition 108 (3):687-701.
  5.  50
    Am I Self-Conscious?Karl Friston - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
  6. Free-Energy and the Brain.Karl J. Friston & Klaas E. Stephan - 2007 - Synthese 159 (3):417 - 458.
    If one formulates Helmholtz's ideas about perception in terms of modern-day theories one arrives at a model of perceptual inference and learning that can explain a remarkable range of neurobiological facts. Using constructs from statistical physics it can be shown that the problems of inferring what cause our sensory inputs and learning causal regularities in the sensorium can be resolved using exactly the same principles. Furthermore, inference and learning can proceed in a biologically plausible fashion. The ensuing scheme rests on (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   100 citations  
  7.  25
    Predictive Processes and the Peculiar Case of Music.Stefan Koelsch, Peter Vuust & Karl Friston - 2019 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 23 (1):63-77.
  8.  27
    Regimes of Expectations: An Active Inference Model of Social Conformity and Human Decision Making.Axel Constant, Maxwell J. D. Ramstead, Samuel P. L. Veissière & Karl Friston - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
  9.  28
    Multiscale Integration: Beyond Internalism and Externalism.Maxwell J. D. Ramstead, Michael D. Kirchhoff, Axel Constant & Karl J. Friston - 2019 - Synthese 198 (Suppl 1):41-70.
    We present a multiscale integrationist interpretation of the boundaries of cognitive systems, using the Markov blanket formalism of the variational free energy principle. This interpretation is intended as a corrective for the philosophical debate over internalist and externalist interpretations of cognitive boundaries; we stake out a compromise position. We first survey key principles of new radical views of cognition. We then describe an internalist interpretation premised on the Markov blanket formalism. Having reviewed these accounts, we develop our positive multiscale account. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  10. A Variational Approach to Niche Construction.Axel Constant, Maxwell Ramstead, Samuel Veissière, John Campbell & Karl Friston - 2018 - Journals of the Royal Society Interface 15:1-14.
    In evolutionary biology, niche construction is sometimes described as a genuine evolutionary process whereby organisms, through their activities and regulatory mechanisms, modify their environment such as to steer their own evolutionary trajectory, and that of other species. There is ongoing debate, however, on the extent to which niche construction ought to be considered a bona fide evolutionary force, on a par with natural selection. Recent formulations of the variational free-energy principle as applied to the life sciences describe the properties of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  11.  35
    Representation Wars: Enacting an Armistice Through Active Inference.Axel Constant, Andy Clark & Karl J. Friston - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Over the last 30 years, representationalist and dynamicist positions in the philosophy of cognitive science have argued over whether neurocognitive processes should be viewed as representational or not. Major scientific and technological developments over the years have furnished both parties with ever more sophisticated conceptual weaponry. In recent years, an enactive generalization of predictive processing – known as active inference – has been proposed as a unifying theory of brain functions. Since then, active inference has fueled both representationalist and dynamicist (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  12.  18
    Free-Energy and the Brain.Karl Friston & Klaas Stephan - 2007 - Synthese 159 (3):417-458.
    If one formulates Helmholtz’s ideas about perception in terms of modern-day theories one arrives at a model of perceptual inference and learning that can explain a remarkable range of neurobiological facts. Using constructs from statistical physics it can be shown that the problems of inferring what cause our sensory inputs and learning causal regularities in the sensorium can be resolved using exactly the same principles. Furthermore, inference and learning can proceed in a biologically plausible fashion. The ensuing scheme rests on (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   97 citations  
  13.  42
    Free-Energy Minimization and the Dark-Room Problem.Karl Friston, Christopher Thornton & Andy Clark - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 3.
  14.  56
    The Active Inference Approach to Ecological Perception: General Information Dynamics for Natural and Artificial Embodied Cognition.Adam Linson, Andy Clark, Subramanian Ramamoorthy & Karl Friston - 2018 - Frontiers in Robotics and AI 5 (21):1-22.
    The emerging neurocomputational vision of humans as embodied, ecologically embedded, social agents—who shape and are shaped by their environment—offers a golden opportunity to revisit and revise ideas about the physical and information-theoretic underpinnings of life, mind, and consciousness itself. In particular, the active inference framework makes it possible to bridge connections from computational neuroscience and robotics/AI to ecological psychology and phenomenology, revealing common underpinnings and overcoming key limitations. AIF opposes the mechanistic to the reductive, while staying fully grounded in a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  15. A Multi-Scale View of the Emergent Complexity of Life: A Free-Energy Proposal.Casper Hesp, Maxwell Ramstead, Axel Constant, Paul Badcock, Michael David Kirchhoff & Karl Friston - forthcoming - In Michael Price & John Campbell (eds.), Evolution, Development, and Complexity: Multiscale Models in Complex Adaptive Systems.
    We review some of the main implications of the free-energy principle (FEP) for the study of the self-organization of living systems – and how the FEP can help us to understand (and model) biotic self-organization across the many temporal and spatial scales over which life exists. In order to maintain its integrity as a bounded system, any biological system - from single cells to complex organisms and societies - has to limit the disorder or dispersion (i.e., the long-run entropy) of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  16. Computational Psychiatry.P. Read Montague, Raymond J. Dolan, Karl J. Friston & Peter Dayan - 2012 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (1):72-80.
  17.  33
    A Duet for One.Karl Friston & Christopher Frith - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 36:390-405.
  18.  18
    Hierarchical Active Inference: A Theory of Motivated Control.Giovanni Pezzulo, Francesco Rigoli & Karl J. Friston - 2018 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 22 (4):294-306.
  19.  24
    The Anatomy of Choice: Active Inference and Agency.Karl Friston, Philipp Schwartenbeck, Thomas FitzGerald, Michael Moutoussis, Timothy Behrens & Raymond J. Dolan - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  20.  21
    The Depressed Brain: An Evolutionary Systems Theory.Paul B. Badcock, Christopher G. Davey, Sarah Whittle, Nicholas B. Allen & Karl J. Friston - 2017 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 21 (3):182-194.
  21.  41
    Consciousness, Dreams, and Inference: The Cartesian Theatre Revisited.J. Allan Hobson & Karl J. Friston - 2014 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 21 (1-2):6-32.
    This paper considers the Cartesian theatre as a metaphor for the virtual reality models that the brain uses to make inferences about the world. This treatment derives from our attempts to understand dreaming and waking consciousness in terms of free energy minimization. The idea here is that the Cartesian theatre is not observed by an internal audience but furnishes a theatre in which fictive narratives and fantasies can be rehearsed and tested against sensory evidence. We suppose the brain is driven (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  22.  19
    Extended Active Inference: Constructing Predictive Cognition Beyond Skulls.Axel Constant, Andy Clark, Michael Kirchhoff & Karl J. Friston - forthcoming - Mind and Language.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  23.  55
    Active Inference and Free Energy.Karl Friston - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (3):212-213.
    Why do brains have so many connections? The principles exposed by Andy Clark provide answers to questions like this by appealing to the notion that brains distil causal regularities in the sensorium and embody them in models of their world. For example, connections embody the fact that causes have particular consequences. This commentary considers the imperatives for this form of embodiment.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  24.  44
    Thinking Through Other Minds: A Variational Approach to Cognition and Culture.Samuel P. L. Veissière, Axel Constant, Maxwell J. D. Ramstead, Karl J. Friston & Laurence J. Kirmayer - 2020 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 43:1-97.
    The processes underwriting the acquisition of culture remain unclear. How are shared habits, norms, and expectations learned and maintained with precision and reliability across large-scale sociocultural ensembles? Is there a unifying account of the mechanisms involved in the acquisition of culture? Notions such as “shared expectations,” the “selective patterning of attention and behaviour,” “cultural evolution,” “cultural inheritance,” and “implicit learning” are the main candidates to underpin a unifying account of cognition and the acquisition of culture; however, their interactions require greater (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  25.  37
    ‘Seeing the Dark’: Grounding Phenomenal Transparency and Opacity in Precision Estimation for Active Inference.Jakub Limanowski & Karl Friston - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
  26.  21
    Exploration, Novelty, Surprise, and Free Energy Minimization.Philipp Schwartenbeck, Thomas FitzGerald, Raymond J. Dolan & Karl Friston - 2013 - Frontiers in Psychology 4.
  27.  21
    Computational Neuropsychology and Bayesian Inference.Thomas Parr, Geraint Rees & Karl J. Friston - 2018 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12.
  28.  33
    Bayesian Inferences About the Self : A Review.Michael Moutoussis, Pasco Fearon, Wael El-Deredy, Raymond J. Dolan & Karl J. Friston - 2014 - Consciousness and Cognition 25:67-76.
    Viewing the brain as an organ of approximate Bayesian inference can help us understand how it represents the self. We suggest that inferred representations of the self have a normative function: to predict and optimise the likely outcomes of social interactions. Technically, we cast this predict-and-optimise as maximising the chance of favourable outcomes through active inference. Here the utility of outcomes can be conceptualised as prior beliefs about final states. Actions based on interpersonal representations can therefore be understood as minimising (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  29.  18
    The Functional Anatomy of Time: What and When in the Brain.Karl Friston & Gyorgy Buzsáki - 2016 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 20 (7):500-511.
  30.  28
    The Projective Consciousness Model and Phenomenal Selfhood.Kenneth Williford, Daniel Bennequin, Karl Friston & David Rudrauf - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
  31.  7
    Attenuating Oneself.Jakub Limanowski & Karl Friston - 2020 - Philosophy and the Mind Sciences 1 (I):1-16.
    In this paper, we address reports of “selfless” experiences from the perspective of active inference and predictive processing. Our argument builds upon grounding self-modelling in active inference as action planning and precision control within deep generative models – thus establishing a link between computational mechanisms and phenomenal selfhood. We propose that “selfless” experiences can be interpreted as cases in which normally congruent processes of computational and phenomenal self-modelling diverge in an otherwise conscious system. We discuss two potential mechanisms – within (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  32.  25
    Uncertainty in Perception and the Hierarchical Gaussian Filter.Christoph D. Mathys, Ekaterina I. Lomakina, Jean Daunizeau, Sandra Iglesias, Kay H. Brodersen, Karl J. Friston & Klaas E. Stephan - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  33.  69
    Degeneracy and Cognitive Anatomy.Cathy J. Price & Karl J. Friston - 2002 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (10):416-421.
  34.  7
    Examining the Continuity Between Life and Mind: Is There a Continuity Between Autopoietic Intentionality and Representationality?Wanja Wiese & Karl J. Friston - 2021 - Philosophies 6 (18):18.
    A weak version of life-mind continuity thesis entails that every living system also has a basic mind. The strong version entails that the same concepts that are sufficient to explain basic minds are also central to understanding non-basic minds. We argue that recent work on the free energy principle supports the following claims with respect to the life-mind continuity thesis: there is a strong continuity between life and mind; all living systems can be described as if they had representational states; (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35.  33
    A Bayesian Account of Psychopathy: A Model of Lacks Remorse and Self-Aggrandizing.Aaron Prosser, Karl Friston, Nathan Bakker & Thomas Parr - 2018 - Computational Psychiatry 2:92-140.
    This article proposes a formal model that integrates cognitive and psychodynamic psychotherapeutic models of psychopathy to show how two major psychopathic traits called lacks remorse and self-aggrandizing can be understood as a form of abnormal Bayesian inference about the self. This model draws on the predictive coding (i.e., active inference) framework, a neurobiologically plausible explanatory framework for message passing in the brain that is formalized in terms of hierarchical Bayesian inference. In summary, this model proposes that these two cardinal psychopathic (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  36.  39
    On Hyperpriors and Hypopriors: Comment on Pellicano and Burr.Karl J. Friston, Rebecca Lawson & Chris D. Frith - 2013 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 17 (1):1.
  37.  40
    Degeneracy and Redundancy in Cognitive Anatomy.Karl J. Friston & Cathy J. Price - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (4):151-152.
  38.  13
    TTOM in Action: Refining the Variational Approach to Cognition and Culture.Samuel P. L. Veissière, Axel Constant, Maxwell J. D. Ramstead, Karl J. Friston & Laurence J. Kirmayer - 2020 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 43.
    The target article “Thinking Through Other Minds” offered an account of the distinctively human capacity to acquire cultural knowledge, norms, and practices. To this end, we leveraged recent ideas from theoretical neurobiology to understand the human mind in social and cultural contexts. Our aim was bothsynthetic– building an integrative model adequate to account for key features of cultural learning and adaptation; andprescriptive– showing how the tools developed to explain brain dynamics can be applied to the emergence of social and cultural (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  39.  18
    A Formal Model of Interpersonal Inference.Michael Moutoussis, Nelson J. Trujillo-Barreto, Wael El-Deredy, Raymond J. Dolan & Karl J. Friston - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  40. Hallucinations and Perceptual Inference.Karl J. Friston - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):764-766.
    This commentary takes a closer look at how “constructive models of subjective perception,” referred to by Collerton et al. (sect. 2), might contribute to the Perception and Attention Deficit (PAD) model. It focuses on the neuronal mechanisms that could mediate hallucinations, or false inference – in particular, the role of cholinergic systems in encoding uncertainty in the context of hierarchical Bayesian models of perceptual inference (Friston 2002b; Yu & Dayan 2002).
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  41.  10
    A World Unto Itself: Human Communication as Active Inference.Jared Vasil, Paul B. Badcock, Axel Constant, Karl Friston & Maxwell J. D. Ramstead - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42.  8
    Changes in the Effective Connectivity of the Social Brain When Making Inferences About Close Others Vs. The Self.Sofia Esménio, José Miguel Soares, Patrícia Oliveira-Silva, Óscar F. Gonçalves, Karl Friston & Joana Fernandes Coutinho - 2020 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 14.
  43.  4
    Simulating Emotions: An Active Inference Model of Emotional State Inference and Emotion Concept Learning.Ryan Smith, Thomas Parr & Karl J. Friston - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44.  5
    Long-Term Physical Exercise and Mindfulness Practice in an Aging Population.Yi-Yuan Tang, Yaxin Fan, Qilin Lu, Li-Hai Tan, Rongxiang Tang, Robert M. Kaplan, Marco C. Pinho, Binu P. Thomas, Kewei Chen, Karl J. Friston & Eric M. Reiman - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45. The Pragmatic Turn: Toward Action-Oriented Views in Cognitive Science.K. Engel Andreas, J. Friston Karl & Kragic Danica (eds.) - 2016 - MIT Press.
  46.  19
    Attention, Predictions and Expectations, and Their Violation: Attentional Control in the Human Brain.Simone Vossel, Joy J. Geng & Karl J. Friston - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  47.  28
    Perception, as You Make It.David W. Vinson, Drew H. Abney, Dima Amso, Anthony Chemero, James E. Cutting, Rick Dale, Jonathan B. Freeman, Laurie B. Feldman, Karl J. Friston, Shaun Gallagher, J. Scott Jordan, Liad Mudrik, Sasha Ondobaka, Daniel C. Richardson, Ladan Shams, Maggie Shiffrar & Michael J. Spivey - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  48.  23
    Keep Focussing: Striatal Dopamine Multiple Functions Resolved in a Single Mechanism Tested in a Simulated Humanoid Robot.Vincenzo G. Fiore, Valerio Sperati, Francesco Mannella, Marco Mirolli, Kevin Gurney, Karl Friston, Raymond J. Dolan & Gianluca Baldassarre - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    The effects of striatal dopamine (DA) on behavior have been widely investigated over the past decades, with “phasic” burst firings considered as the key expression of a reward prediction error responsible for reinforcement learning. Less well studied is “tonic” DA, where putative functions include the idea that it is a regulator of vigor, incentive salience, disposition to exert an effort and a modulator of approach strategies. We present a model combining tonic and phasic DA to show how different outflows triggered (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49.  72
    Modes or Models: A Critique on Independent Component Analysis for fMRI.Karl J. Friston - 1998 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (10):373-375.
  50.  8
    Relating the “Mirrorness” of Mirror Neurons to Their Origins.James M. Kilner & Karl J. Friston - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (2):207-208.
1 — 50 / 72