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  1.  6
    Is UNESCO’s Undergraduate Bioethics Integrated Curriculum Fit for Purpose?Ilora G. Finlay, Kartina A. Choong & Seshagiri R. Nimmagadda - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (9):600-603.
    In 2017, UNESCO introduced an Undergraduate Bioethics Integrated Curriculum to be taught in Indian medical schools, with an implied suggestion that it could subsequently be rolled out to medical schools in UNESCO’s other member states. Its stated aim is to create ethical awareness from an early stage of a doctor’s training by infusing ethics instructions throughout the entire undergraduate medical syllabus. There are advantages to a standardised integrated curriculum where none existed. However, the curriculum as presently drafted risks failing to (...)
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    Re A and the United Kingdom Code of Practice for the Diagnosis and Confirmation of Death: Should a Secular Construct of Death Override Religious Values in a Pluralistic Society?Mohamed Y. Rady & Kartina A. Choong - 2018 - HEC Forum 30 (1):71-89.
    The determination of death by neurological criteria remains controversial scientifically, culturally, and legally, worldwide. In the United Kingdom, although the determination of death by neurological criteria is not legally codified, the Code of Practice of the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges is customarily used for neurological death determination and treatment withdrawal. Unlike some states in the US, however, there are no provisions under the law requiring accommodation of and respect for residents' religious rights and commitments when secular conceptions of death (...)
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  3.  35
    Re A and the United Kingdom Code of Practice for the Diagnosis and Confirmation of Death: Should a Secular Construct of Death Override Religious Values in a Pluralistic Society?Kartina A. Choong & Mohamed Y. Rady - 2018 - HEC Forum 30 (1):71-89.
    The determination of death by neurological criteria remains controversial scientifically, culturally, and legally, worldwide. In the United Kingdom, although the determination of death by neurological criteria is not legally codified, the Code of Practice of the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges is customarily used for neurological death determination and treatment withdrawal. Unlike some states in the US, however, there are no provisions under the law requiring accommodation of and respect for residents' religious rights and commitments when secular conceptions of death (...)
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