Results for 'Kate E. Tunstall'

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  1.  4
    « Ne nous engageons point dans les querelles » : Un projet de guerre perpétuelle?Kate E. Tunstall - 2016 - Revue de Synthèse 137 (3):345-372.
    Résumé Cet article aborde la querelle comme un élément de la stratégie d’un philosophe vis-à-vis de la postérité. On pourrait évidemment penser à des querelleurs invétérés comme Pascal, Voltaire ou Rousseau, mais il sera question ici du cas plus complexe de Diderot et du dernier ouvrage publié de son vivant, l’_Essai sur les règnes de Claude et de Néron et sur les moeurs et les écrits de Sénèque pour servir à l’introduction de la lecture de ce philosophe_ (1782). L’article démontre (...)
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  2.  41
    Displacement, Asylum, Migration: The Oxford Amnesty Lectures 2004.Kate E. Tunstall (ed.) - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume is based on the 2004 series of the Oxford Amnesty Lectures, one of the world's leading name lecture series. In it major figures in philosophy, political science, law, psychoanalysis, sociology, and literature address the challenges that displacement, asylum, and migration pose to our notions of human rights.
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  3.  19
    Paradoxe sur le portrait: Autoportrait de Diderot en Montaigne.Kate E. Tunstall - 2007 - Diderot Studies 30:195 - 207.
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  4. Text, images, intertext: Diderot, Chardin and Pliny.Kate E. Tunstall - 2006 - In G. J. Mallinson (ed.), Interdisciplinarity: Qu'est-Ce Que les Lumières: La Reconnaissance au Dix-Huitième Siècle. Voltaire Foundation.
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  5.  19
    « Ne nous engageons point dans les querelles » : Un projet de guerre perpétuelle?Kate E. Tunstall - 2016 - Revue de Synthèse 137 (3-4):345-372.
    RésuméCet article aborde la querelle comme un élément de la stratégie d’un philosophe vis-à-vis de la postérité. On pourrait évidemment penser à des querelleurs invétérés comme Pascal, Voltaire ou Rousseau, mais il sera question ici du cas plus complexe de Diderot et du dernier ouvrage publié de son vivant, l’Essai sur les règnes de Claude et de Néron et sur les moeurs et les écrits de Sénèque pour servir à l’introduction de la lecture de ce philosophe. L’article démontre que celui-ci (...)
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  6. II. Qu'est-ce que les lumières?Jean Salem & Guillaume Pigeard de Gurbert et Kate E. Tunstall - 2006 - In G. J. Mallinson (ed.), Interdisciplinarity: Qu'est-Ce Que les Lumières: La Reconnaissance au Dix-Huitième Siècle. Voltaire Foundation.
     
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  7. How causal are microbiomes? A comparison with the H elicobacter pylori explanation of ulcers.Kate E. Lynch, Emily C. Parke & Maureen A. O’Malley - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (6):62.
    Human microbiome research makes causal connections between entire microbial communities and a wide array of traits that range from physiological diseases to psychological states. To evaluate these causal claims, we first examine a well-known single-microbe causal explanation: of Helicobacter pylori causing ulcers. This apparently straightforward causal explanation is not so simple, however. It does not achieve a key explanatory standard in microbiology, of Koch’s postulates, which rely on manipulations of single-microorganism cultures to infer causal relationships to disease. When Koch’s postulates (...)
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  8.  69
    Interpreting Heritability Causally.Kate E. Lynch & Pierrick Bourrat - 2017 - Philosophy of Science 84 (1):14-34.
    A high heritability estimate usually corresponds to a situation in which trait variation is largely caused by genetic variation. However, in some cases of gene-environment covariance, causal intuitions about the sources of trait difference can vary, leading experts to disagree as to how the heritability estimate should be interpreted. We argue that the source of contention for these cases is an inconsistency in the interpretation of the concepts ‘genotype’, ‘phenotype’, and ‘environment’. We propose an interpretation of these terms under which (...)
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  9. Genetic essentialism: The mediating role of essentialist biases on the relationship between genetic knowledge and the interpretations of genetic information.Kate E. Lynch, Ilan Dar Nimrod, Ruth Kuntzman, Georgia MacNevin, Marlon Woods & James Morandini - 2021 - European Journal of Medical Genetics 64 (1):104119.
    Purpose Genetic research, via the mainstream media, presents the public with novel, profound findings almost on a daily basis. However, it is not clear how much laypeople understand these presentations and how they integrate such new findings into their knowledge base. Genetic knowledge (GK), existing causal beliefs, and genetic essentialist tendencies (GET) have been implicated in such processes; the current study assesses the relationships between these elements and how brief presentations of media releases of scientific findings about genetics are consumed (...)
     
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  10.  95
    heritability and causal reasoning.Kate E. Lynch - 2017 - Biology and Philosophy 32 (1):25-49.
    Gene–environment covariance is the phenomenon whereby genetic differences bias variation in developmental environment, and is particularly problematic for assigning genetic and environmental causation in a heritability analysis. The interpretation of these cases has differed amongst biologists and philosophers, leading some to reject the utility of heritability estimates altogether. This paper examines the factors that influence causal reasoning when G–E covariance is present, leading to interpretive disagreement between scholars. It argues that the causal intuitions elicited are influenced by concepts of agency (...)
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  11.  54
    Microbiome causality: further reflections.Kate E. Lynch, Emily C. Parke & Maureen A. O’Malley - 2020 - Biology and Philosophy 35 (2):1-16.
  12.  23
    Why microbes, not microbiomes, are better causal explanations in gut-brain research.Kate E. Lynch - 2019 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 42.
    Much microbiota-gut-brain research focuses on the causal role of microbiomes as a whole, rather than their component parts: microbes. Hooks et al. find these whole-community explanations inadequate; however, they do not provide suggestions for better explanations. By appealing to proportionality – a criterion that can be used to develop more appropriate causal explanations – more accurate causal claims can be made.
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  13.  7
    effective conservation.Kate E. Lynch & Daniel T. Blumstein - 2020 - Trends in Ecology and Evolution 35 (10):857-859.
    Effective altruism is a growing humanitarian movement with a track record of success in evaluating the effectiveness of charitable spending across a wide range of projects. We suggest ways in which the foundations of this movement can be applied to the complex world of conservation.
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  14.  14
    Variation in the level of boldness behaviour across individuals, sexes, and strains of the guppy.Kate E. Lynch, Darrell Kemp & Samantha St Jean - 2022 - Marine and Freshwater Research 73 (4):441-453.
    The concept of animal personality is based on consistent individual differences in behaviour, yet little is known about the factors responsible for such variation. Theory based on sex-specific selection predicts sexual dimorphism in personality-related traits and, in some cases, differences in trait variances between the sexes. In this study, we examined the sources of individual variation for boldness behaviour in guppies (Poecilia reticulata). We first demonstrated heightened boldness expression in males relative to females across feral wild types, artificially selected domestic (...)
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  15.  8
    Futurity and Postponement: Christina Rossetti and the Yearning for Advent.Kate E. Brown - 2004 - Intertexts 8 (1):15-21.
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  16.  25
    New historical and philosophical perspectives on quantitative genetics.Davide Serpico, Kate E. Lynch & Theodore M. Porter - 2023 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 97 (C):29-33.
    The aim of this virtual special issue is to bring together philosophical and historical perspectives to address long-standing issues in the interpretation, utility, and impacts of quantitative genetics methods and findings. Methodological approaches and the underlying scientific understanding of genetics and heredity have transformed since the field's inception. These advances have brought with them new philosophical issues regarding the interpretation and understanding of quantitative genetic results. The contributions in this issue demonstrate that there is still work to be done integrating (...)
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  17. The intra-east cinema: the re-framing of an "East Asian" film sphere.Kate E. Taylor-Jones - 2012 - In Saër Maty Bâ & Will Higbee (eds.), De-westernizing film studies. New York: Routledge.
     
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  18.  14
    Extinction.Andy Purvis, Kate E. Jones & Georgina M. Mace - 2000 - Bioessays 22 (12):1123-1133.
    In the life of any species, extinction is the final evolutionary process. It is a common one at present, as the world is entering a major extinction crisis. The pattern of extinction and threat is very non-random, with some taxa being more vulnerable than others. Explaining why some taxa are affected and some escape is a major goal of conservation biology. More ambitiously, a predictive model could, in principle, be built by integrating comparable studies of past and present extinctions. We (...)
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  19. Affective passions: the dancing female body and colonial rupture in Zouzou (1934) and Karmen Geï (2001).Saër Maty Bâ & Kate E. Taylor-Jones - 2012 - In Saër Maty Bâ & Will Higbee (eds.), De-westernizing film studies. New York: Routledge.
     
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  20.  30
    Writing content predicts benefit from written expressive disclosure: Evidence for repeated exposure and self-affirmation.Andrea N. Niles, Kate E. Byrne Haltom, Matthew D. Lieberman, Christopher Hur & Annette L. Stanton - 2016 - Cognition and Emotion 30 (2):258-274.
  21.  13
    Executive Function in Adolescence: Associations with Child and Family Risk Factors and Self-Regulation in Early Childhood.Donna Berthelsen, Nicole Hayes, Sonia L. J. White & Kate E. Williams - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  22.  6
    Planting the Seeds: Orchestral Music Education as a Context for Fostering Growth Mindsets.Steven J. Holochwost, Judith Hill Bose, Elizabeth Stuk, Eleanor D. Brown, Kate E. Anderson & Dennie Palmer Wolf - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Growth mindset is an important aspect of children’s socioemotional development and is subject to change due to environmental influence. Orchestral music education may function as a fertile context in which to promote growth mindset; however, this education is not widely available to children facing economic hardship. This study examined whether participation in a program of orchestral music education was associated with higher levels of overall growth mindset and greater change in levels of musical growth mindset among children placed at risk (...)
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  23.  8
    Water and Meadow Views Both Afford Perceived but Not Performance-Based Attention Restoration: Results From Two Experimental Studies.Katherine A. Johnson, Annabelle Pontvianne, Vi Ly, Rui Jin, Jonathan Haris Januar, Keitaro Machida, Leisa D. Sargent, Kate E. Lee, Nicholas S. G. Williams & Kathryn J. H. Williams - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    Attention Restoration Theory proposes that exposure to natural environments helps to restore attention. For sustained attention—the ongoing application of focus to a task, the effect appears to be modest, and the underlying mechanisms of attention restoration remain unclear. Exposure to nature may improve attention performance through many means: modulation of alertness and one’s connection to nature were investigated here, in two separate studies. In both studies, participants performed the Sustained Attention to Response Task before and immediately after viewing a meadow, (...)
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  24.  52
    How causal are microbiomes? A comparison with the Helicobacter pylori explanation of ulcers.Kate E. Lynch, Emily C. Parke & Maureen A. O’Malley - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (6):62.
    Human microbiome research makes causal connections between entire microbial communities and a wide array of traits that range from physiological diseases to psychological states. To evaluate these causal claims, we first examine a well-known single-microbe causal explanation: of Helicobacter pylori causing ulcers. This apparently straightforward causal explanation is not so simple, however. It does not achieve a key explanatory standard in microbiology, of Koch’s postulates, which rely on manipulations of single-microorganism cultures to infer causal relationships to disease. When Koch’s postulates (...)
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  25.  47
    How causal are microbiomes? A comparison with the Helicobacter pylori explanation of ulcers.Kate E. Lynch, Emily C. Parke & Maureen A. O’Malley - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (6):62.
    Human microbiome research makes causal connections between entire microbial communities and a wide array of traits that range from physiological diseases to psychological states. To evaluate these causal claims, we first examine a well-known single-microbe causal explanation: of Helicobacter pylori causing ulcers. This apparently straightforward causal explanation is not so simple, however. It does not achieve a key explanatory standard in microbiology, of Koch’s postulates, which rely on manipulations of single-microorganism cultures to infer causal relationships to disease. When Koch’s postulates (...)
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  26.  18
    AI as a boss? A national US survey of predispositions governing comfort with expanded AI roles in society.Kate K. Mays, Yiming Lei, Rebecca Giovanetti & James E. Katz - 2022 - AI and Society 37 (4):1587-1600.
    People’s comfort with and acceptability of artificial intelligence (AI) instantiations is a topic that has received little systematic study. This is surprising given the topic’s relevance to the design, deployment and even regulation of AI systems. To help fill in our knowledge base, we conducted mixed-methods analysis based on a survey of a representative sample of the US population (_N_ = 2254). Results show that there are two distinct social dimensions to comfort with AI: as a peer and as a (...)
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  27. The meaning of "cause" in genetics.Kate E. Lynch - 2021 - Combining Human Genetics and Causal Inference to Understand Human Disease and Development. Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine.
    Causation has multiple distinct meanings in genetics. One reason for this is meaning slippage between two concepts of the gene: Mendelian and molecular. Another reason is that a variety of genetic methods address different kinds of causal relationships. Some genetic studies address causes of traits in individuals, which can only be assessed when single genes follow predictable inheritance patterns that reliably cause a trait. A second sense concerns the causes of trait differences within a population. Whereas some single genes can (...)
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  28.  72
    causal reasoning about genetics: synthesis and future directions.Kate E. Lynch, Ilan Dar Nimrod, Paul Edmund Griffiths & James Morandini - 2019 - Behavior Genetics 2 (49):221-234.
    When explaining the causes of human behavior, genes are often given a special status. They are thought to relate to an intrinsic human 'essence', and essentialist biases have been shown to skew the way in which causation is assessed. Causal reasoning in general is subject to other pre-existing biases, including beliefs about normativity and morality. In this synthesis we show how factors which influence causal reasoning can be mapped to a framework of genetic essentialism, which reveals both the shared and (...)
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  29.  18
    The war came alive inside of them.Kate E. Temoney - 2021 - Journal of Religious Ethics 49 (3):479-494.
    Increasingly, scholarship on moral injury is expanding to include non‐military personnel, and considers a violation of bodily integrity—for example, of civilian women who are targeted for sexual violence in warfare—as a particularly egregious harm. Moral injury discourse also extends beyond the individual to the social context in which moral injury arises, its relational effects, and its utterly devastating impact on personhood, an impact frequently characterized as a “soul wound.” The intersection of genocidal rape—both as an individual and a group harm—with (...)
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  30.  52
    A Mobilising Concept? Unpacking Academic Representations of Responsible Research and Innovation.Barbara E. Ribeiro, Robert D. J. Smith & Kate Millar - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):81-103.
    This paper makes a plea for more reflexive attempts to develop and anchor the emerging concept of responsible research and innovation. RRI has recently emerged as a buzzword in science policy, becoming a focus of concerted experimentation in many academic circles. Its performative capacity means that it is able to mobilise resources and spaces despite no common understanding of what it is or should be ‘made of’. In order to support reflection and practice amongst those who are interested in and (...)
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  31.  17
    Distinguishing Primary and Secondary Early Intervention Programs: Implications for Families, Clinicians, and Policymakers.Kate E. Wallis & Elliott M. Weiss - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (11):65-67.
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  32.  25
    A disanalogy with RCTs and its implications for second-generation causal knowledge.Kate E. Lynch, Rachael L. Brown, Jeremy Strasser & Shang Long Yeo - 2023 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 46:e194.
    We are less optimistic than Madole & Harden that family-based genome-wide association studies (GWASs) will lead to significant second-generation causal knowledge. Despite bearing some similarities, family-based GWASs and randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are not identical. Most RCTs assess a relatively homogenous causal stimulus as a treatment, whereas GWASs assess highly heterogeneous causal stimuli. Thus, GWAS results will not translate so easily into second-generation causal knowledge.
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  33.  39
    Incorporating ethical principles into clinical research protocols: a tool for protocol writers and ethics committees.Rebecca H. Li, Mary C. Wacholtz, Mark Barnes, Liam Boggs, Susan Callery-D'Amico, Amy Davis, Alla Digilova, David Forster, Kate Heffernan, Maeve Luthin, Holly Fernandez Lynch, Lindsay McNair, Jennifer E. Miller, Jacquelyn Murphy, Luann Van Campen, Mark Wilenzick, Delia Wolf, Cris Woolston, Carmen Aldinger & Barbara E. Bierer - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (4):229-234.
    A novel Protocol Ethics Tool Kit (‘Ethics Tool Kit’) has been developed by a multi-stakeholder group of the Multi-Regional Clinical Trials Center of Brigham and Women9s Hospital and Harvard. The purpose of the Ethics Tool Kit is to facilitate effective recognition, consideration and deliberation of critical ethical issues in clinical trial protocols. The Ethics Tool Kit may be used by investigators and sponsors to develop a dedicated Ethics Section within a protocol to improve the consistency and transparency between clinical trial (...)
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  34. Choosing Actions.A. Rosenbaum David, M. Chapman Kate, J. Coelho Chase, Breanna Lanyun Gong & E. Studenka - 2014 - In Ezequiel Morsella & T. Andrew Poehlman (eds.), Consciousness and action control. Lausanne, Switzerland: Frontiers Media SA.
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  35.  15
    Evidence for distinct contributions of form and motion information to the recognition of emotions from body gestures.Wataru Sato, Sakiko Yoshikawa, Edouard Machery, Paul E. Dux, Irina M. Harris, Anthony P. Atkinson, Mary L. Tunstall, Winand H. Dittrich, Francesco Pavani & Giovanni Galfano - 2007 - Cognition 104 (1):59-72.
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  36.  13
    Josiah Royce in Focus (review).Dwayne A. Tunstall - 2009 - The Pluralist 4 (2):127-134.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:Josiah Royce in FocusDwayne A. TunstallJosiah Royce in Focus Jacquelyn Ann K. Kegley. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 2008.Josiah Royce in Focus reads like a sequel to Jacquelyn Ann K. Kegley’s earlier book on Royce’s public philosophy, Genuine Individuals and Genuine Communities. As she did in Genuine Individuals and Genuine Communities, Kegley does a remarkable job of interpreting Royce’s philosophy such that it has [End Page 127] contemporary (...)
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  37.  59
    Book reviews and notices. [REVIEW]Kate Brittlebank, Kathleen D. Morrison, Christopher Key Chapple, D. L. Johnson, Fritz Blackwell, Carl Olson, Chenchuramaiah T. Bathala, Gail Hinich Sutherland, Gail Hinich Sutherland, Ashley James Dawson, Nancy Auer Falk, Carl Olson, Dan Cozort, Karen Pechilis Prentiss, Tessa Bartholomeusz, Katharine Adeney, D. L. Johnson, Heidi Pauwels, Paul Waldau, Paul Waldau, C. Mackenzie Brown, David Kinsley, John E. Cort, Jonathan S. Walters, Christopher Key Chapple, Helene T. Russell, Jeffrey J. Kripal, Dermot Killingley, Dorothy M. Figueira & John S. Strong - 1998 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 2 (1):117-156.
  38.  14
    Understanding the Needs of Young People Who Engage in Self-Harm: A Qualitative Investigation.Sarah E. Hetrick, Aruni Subasinghe, Kate Anglin, Laura Hart, Amy Morgan & Jo Robinson - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  39.  4
    The Silence Around Non-Ordinary Experiences During the Pandemic.Bettina E. Schmidt & Kate Stockly - 2022 - Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review 13 (1):1-21.
    The article presents new research about spiritual experiences during COVID-19. It starts with a wider discussion about the relationship between spirituality and wellbeing, based on research carried out in Brazil and the United Kingdom before the pandemic. The research showed a strict division between personal faith and medical treatment, reflecting a professional distance when treating patients that results in patients’ unwillingness to speak about their experience to anyone in the medical profession, even when these experiences impact their mental health. The (...)
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  40.  21
    EEG activity during administration of low-concentration odors.Tyler S. Lorig, Kate B. Herman, Gary E. Schwartz & William S. Cain - 1990 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 28 (5):405-408.
  41.  37
    Working memory and intelligibility of hearing-aid processed speech.Pamela E. Souza, Kathryn H. Arehart, Jing Shen, Melinda Anderson & James M. Kates - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  42.  11
    Calibrating Translational Cancer Research: Collaboration without Consensus in Interdisciplinary Laboratory Meetings.Steve Fifield, Regina E. Smardon & Kate M. Centellas - 2014 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 39 (3):311-335.
    Based on an original ethnographic study of a translational cancer research institute in the United States, we propose calibration as a process that makes interdisciplinary collaboration without consensus possible. Calibration refers to ongoing, day-to-day negotiation and alignment of personal identities, disciplinary commitments, and research group customs that occur during face-to-face group deliberations around everyday research concerns. Calibration provides a mechanism that explains how collaboration without consensus is possible. Crucially, it does not presuppose that interdisciplinary collaboration either indicates or causes the (...)
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  43.  14
    Determinants of Non-paid Task Division in Gay-, Lesbian-, and Heterosexual-Parent Families With Infants Conceived Using Artificial Reproductive Techniques.Loes Van Rijn - Van Gelderen, Kate Ellis-Davies, Marijke Huijzer-Engbrenghof, Terrence D. Jorgensen, Martine Gross, Alice Winstanley, Berengere Rubio, Olivier Vecho, Michael E. Lamb & Henny M. W. Bos - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11:515593.
    Background: The division of non-paid labor in heterosexual parents in the West is usually still gender-based, with mothers taking on the majority of direct caregiving responsibilities. However, in same-sex couples, gender cannot be the deciding factor. Inspired by Feinberg’s ecological model of co-parenting, this study investigated whether infant temperament, parent factors (biological relatedness to child, psychological adjustment, parenting stress, and work status), and partner relationship quality explained how first-time gay, lesbian, and heterosexual parents divided labor (childcare and family decision-making) when (...)
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  44. Mental Disorder, Meaning-making, and Religious Engagement.Kate Finley - 2023 - Theologica 7 (1).
    Meaning-making plays a central role in how we deal with experiences of suffering, including those due to mental disorder. And for many, religious beliefs, experiences, and practices (hereafter, religious engagement) play a central role in informing this meaning-making. However, a crucial facet of the relationship between experiences of mental disorder and religious engagement remains underexplored—namely the potentially positive effects of mental disorder on religious engagement (e.g. experiences of bipolar disorder increasing sense of God’s presence). In what follows, I will present (...)
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  45. Recognition, Responsibility, and Rights: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory.Iris Marion Young, Diana T. Meyers, Misha Strauss, Cressida Heyes, Kate Parsons & Heidi E. Grasswick - 2002 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In the words of Catharine MacKinnon, "a woman is not yet a name for a way of being human." In other words, women are still excluded, as authors and agents, from identifying what it is to be human and what therefore violates the dignity and integrity of humans. Recognition, Responsibility, and Rights is written in response to that failure. This collection of essays by prominent feminist thinkers advances the positive feminist project of remapping the moral landscape by developing theory that (...)
     
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  46.  15
    Corrigendum: Determinants of Non-paid Task Division in Gay-, Lesbian-, and Heterosexual-Parent Families With Infants Conceived Using Artificial Reproductive Techniques.Loes Van Rijn - Van Gelderen, Kate Ellis-Davies, Marijke Huijzer-Engbrenghof, Terrence D. Jorgensen, Martine Gross, Alice Winstanley, Berengere Rubio, Olivier Vecho, Michael E. Lamb & Henny M. W. Bos - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11:565827.
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  47.  79
    La Métaphysique de Royce, avec un appendice de texts, publiée et préfacée par Miklos Vetö (review). [REVIEW]Dwayne Alexander Tunstall - 2006 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (4):582-585.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:La Métaphysique de Royce, avec un appendice de texts, publiée et préfacée par Miklos VetöDwayne Alexander TunstallGabriel Marcel La Métaphysique de Royce, avec un appendice de texts, publiée et préfacée par Miklos Vetö Paris L'Hartmattan, 2005xix + 250 pp.Gabriel Marcel's La Métaphysique de Royce (MR) is the most influential Continental interpretation of Josiah Royce's philosophy. Moreover, Marcel's monograph-length study of Royce's metaphysics remains the only significant work on (...)
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  48. Embodied Cognition and the Grip of Computational Metaphors.Kate Finley - forthcoming - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy.
    (Penultimate draft) Embodied Cognition holds that bodily (e.g. sensorimotor) states and processes are directly involved in some higher-level cognitive functions (e.g. reasoning). This challenges traditional views of cognition according to which bodily states and processes are, at most, indirectly involved in higher-level cognition. Although some elements of Embodied Cognition have been integrated into mainstream cognitive science, others still face adamant resistance. In this paper, rather than straightforwardly defend Embodied Cognition against specific objections I will do the following. First, I will (...)
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  49. A Defense of Cognitive Penetration and the Face-Race Lightness Illusion.Kate Finley - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 1:1-28.
    Cognitive Penetration holds that cognitive states and processes, specifically propositional attitudes (e.g., beliefs), sometimes directly impact features of perceptual experiences (e.g., the coloring of an object). In contrast, more traditional views hold that propositional attitudes do not directly impact perceptual experiences, but rather are only involved in interpreting or judging these experiences. Understandably, Cognitive Penetration is controversial and has been criticized on both theoretical and empirical grounds. I focus on defending it from the latter kind of objection and in doing (...)
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  50.  31
    Proxies of Trustworthiness: A Novel Framework to Support the Performance of Trust in Human Health Research.Kate Harvey & Graeme Laurie - forthcoming - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-21.
    Without trust there is no credible human health research (HHR). This article accepts this truism and addresses a crucial question that arises: how can trust continually be promoted in an ever-changing and uncertain HHR environment? The article analyses long-standing mechanisms that are designed to elicit trust—such as consent, anonymization, and transparency—and argues that these are best understood as trust represented by proxies of trustworthiness, i.e., regulatory attempts to convey the trustworthiness of the HHR system and/or its actors. Often, such proxies (...)
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