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  1.  8
    Arguments About Abortion: Personhood, Morality, and Law.Kate Greasley - 2017 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Does the morality of abortion depend on the moral status of the human fetus? Must the law of abortion presume an answer to the question of when personhood begins? Can a law which permits late abortion but not infanticide be morally justified? These are just some of the questions this book sets out to address. With an extended analysis of the moral and legal status of abortion, Kate Greasley offers an alternative account to the reputable arguments of Ronald Dworkin and (...)
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  2.  85
    A Legal Market in Organs: The Problem of Exploitation.Kate Greasley - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (1):51-56.
    The article considers the objection to a commercial market in living donor organs for transplantation on the ground that such a market would be exploitative of the vendors. It examines a key challenge to that objection, to the effect that denying poor people the option to sell an organ is to withhold from them the best that a bad situation has to offer. The article casts serious doubt on this attempt at justifying an organ market, and its philosophical underpinning. Drawing, (...)
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  3.  4
    Abortion Rights: For and Against.Kate Greasley & Christopher Kaczor - 2017 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book features opening arguments followed by two rounds of reply between two moral philosophers on opposing sides of the abortion debate. In the opening essays, Kate Greasley and Christopher Kaczor lay out what they take to be the best case for and against abortion rights. In the ensuing dialogue, they engage with each other's arguments and each responds to criticisms fielded by the other. Their conversational argument explores such fundamental questions as: what gives a person the right to life? (...)
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  4.  18
    Sex, Reasons, Pro Tanto Wronging, and the Structure of Rape Liability.Kate Greasley - 2021 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 15 (2):159-179.
    Some recent scholarship in the philosophy of criminal law has claimed that sexual penetration ‘per se’—meaning, consensual or otherwise—is pro tanto morally wrong, or that there exist ‘general reasons’ against it. On such a view, penetrative sex is only ever at best justified wrongdoing. When paired with an influential view about the theoretical basis of the offence-defence distinction in criminal law, the apparent implication is that sexual penetration alone ought to constitute the actus reus of rape, with the question of (...)
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  5.  11
    Rebecca J. Cook, Joanna N. Erdman, and Bernard M. Dickens : Abortion Law in Transnational Perspective: Cases and Controversies: University of Pennsylvania Press, Philadelphia, 2014, 480 Pp, £45.50 , ISBN: 978-0-8122-4627-8. [REVIEW]Kate Greasley - 2016 - Feminist Legal Studies 24 (1):97-102.
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  6.  19
    Is Sex-Selective Abortion Against the Law?Kate Greasley - 2016 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 36 (3):535-564.
    The article addresses the legal status of ‘sex-selective’ abortion in British law. It argues, firstly, that abortions for which knowledge of fetal sex is a ‘but-for’ cause can be lawful under the terms of the Abortion Act 1967, so long as one of the physical or mental health grounds in section 1 of the Act is attested to in good faith by two medical professionals. The failure of governmental and health bodies to correctly state the law pertaining to sex-selective abortion (...)
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  7.  2
    Persons, Parts and Property: How Should We Regulate Human Tissue in the 21st Century?Imogen Goold, Jonathan Herring, Kate Greasley & Loane Skene (eds.) - 2014 - Hart Publishing.
    The contributions in this volume represent a detailed exploration of the salient legal and theoretical puzzles arising out of the body-as-property question, and a collation of the broad spectrum of analyses on offer.
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  8. Abortion and Regret.Kate Greasley - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (12):705-711.
    The article considers three theses about postabortion regret which seek to illustrate its pertinence to reasoning about abortion, and which are often deployed, either explicitly or implicitly, to dissuade women out of that reproductive choice. The first is that postabortion regret renders an abortion morally unjustified. The second is that that a relatively high incidence of postabortion regret—compared with a lower incidence of postnatal regret in the relevant comparator field—is good evidence for the moral impermissibility of abortion choice. The third (...)
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  9.  14
    R(Purdy) V DPP and the Case for Wilful Blindness.Kate Greasley - 2010 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 30 (2):301-326.
    This article critiques the recent House of Lords decision, R(Purdy) v DPP, and explores the wider debate over the legalization of assisted suicide, with particular focus on assistance in ‘suicide-tourism’. It proceeds in roughly two parts. In the first part, I seek to make the case that it was not legally necessary for the Lords to order that the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) clarify his long-standing policy of not prosecuting those who compassionately assist loved ones to travel abroad to (...)
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  10.  24
    The Pearl of the 'Pro-Life' Movement? Reflections on the Kermit Gosnell Controversy.Kate Greasley - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (6):419-423.
    The paper comments briefly on the recent controversy surrounding the criminal prosecution and conviction of rogue abortion doctor Kermit Gosnell in the USA, for, among other things, the murder of infants born alive. Without contesting the disturbing nature of the crimes committed by Gosnell and his colleagues, it critiques a few ways in which opponents of abortion have sought to use the case as ammunition against the legal provision of abortion and against the morality of all abortion.
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  11.  12
    The Human Body as Property? Possession, Control and Commodification.Imogen Goold, Loane Skene, Jonathan Herring & Kate Greasley - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (1):1-2.
    In the wake of three high-profile judicial decisions concerning the use of human biological materials, the editors of this collection felt in 2011 that there was a need for detailed scholarly exploration of the ethical and legal implications of these decisions. For centuries, it seemed that in Australia and England and Wales, individuals did not have any proprietary interests in their excised tissue. Others might acquire such interests, but there had been no clear decision on the rights or otherwise of (...)
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  12.  14
    Prenatal Personhood and Life's Intrinsic Value: Reappraising Dworkin on Abortion.Kate Greasley - 2016 - Legal Theory 22 (2):124-152.
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  13.  15
    Review of David Boonin, Beyond Roe: Why Abortion Should be Legal Even if the Fetus is a Person. [REVIEW]Kate Greasley - 2021 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 15 (3):535-544.
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  14.  18
    The Morality of Lying and the Murderer at the Door.Kate Greasley - 2019 - Law and Philosophy 38 (5-6):439-452.
    The article engages with some of the main claims in chapter 1 of Seana Shiffrin’s book Speech Matters. There, Shiffrin sets out a case for a general moral prohibition on lying, based on the conditions required for reliable speech, and circumscribes the permissible falsehoods that could be uttered to would-be moral criminals, such as Kant’s familiar murderer at the door. I raise a few questions about the case for the general moral prohibition on lying and about Shiffrin’s basis for distinguishing (...)
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