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  1.  13
    What Does Neoliberalism Mean for Christian Ethics?Kate Ward - 2024 - Studies in Christian Ethics 37 (2):383-396.
    This article reviews three new books analysing the phenomenon of neoliberalism through religious lenses and comments on how Christian ethics should navigate among various distinct uses of the term ‘neoliberalism’ and the solutions a Christian ethical approach proposes to the ways in which neoliberalism harms humans and societies.
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  2.  50
    Porters to Heaven.Kate Ward - 2014 - Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (2):216-242.
    This essay presents Augustine as a rich ethical resource on issues of wealth and poverty. Contrary to prevalent views that he had little to say on issues of economic justice, Augustine decries wealth as morally dangerous, promotes the agency of the poor in advocating for themselves with the wealthy, and supports distributive justice. Augustine envisions an interdependent Christian community where the wealthy not only help the poor, but rely on the poor to help them achieve salvation by “bearing their goods (...)
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  3. Bothering to love: James F. Keenan's retrieval and reinvention of Catholic ethics.Christopher P. Vogt & Kate Ward (eds.) - 2024 - Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books.
    Essays honoring the work of Catholic ethicist James F. Keenan.
     
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  4.  6
    Consumer Ethics in a Global Economy: How Buying Here Causes Injustice There.Kate Ward - 2019 - Journal of Catholic Social Thought 17 (2):347-349.
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  5.  8
    Human and Alienating Work: What Sex Worker Advocates Can Teach Catholic Social Thought.Kate Ward - 2021 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 41 (2):261-278.
    In Catholic social thought (CST), work that is exploitative, immoral, or hopelessly monotonous can be labeled alienating: its performance makes the worker a stranger to her own, God-given human nature. CST traditionally understands sex work, which directs the human sexual faculties to ends other than the unitive and procreative, as a paradigmatic example of alienating work, and this paper will not disagree. Instead, I will show how accepting sex worker advocates’ claim that “sex work is work” reveals that while sex (...)
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  6.  15
    ‘Mere Poverty Excites Little Compassion’: Adam Smith, Moral Judgment and the Poor.Kate Ward - 2016 - Heythrop Journal 61 (1):97-114.
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  7.  18
    ‘Mere Poverty Excites Little Compassion’: Adam Smith, Moral Judgment and the Poor.Kate Ward - 2017 - Heythrop Journal 61 (1):97-114.
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  8.  15
    ‘Mere Poverty Excites Little Compassion’: Adam Smith, Moral Judgment and the Poor.Kate Ward - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (1):97-114.
  9.  14
    Toward a Christian Virtue Account of Moral Luck.Kate Ward - 2018 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 38 (1):131-145.
    Structural evil impacts persons’ experiences differently, a reality that feminist philosophers Claudia Card and Lisa Tessman have termed “moral luck.” As Christian ethicists grapple with privilege and oppression, we lack a satisfactory framework to describe how particular life circumstances impact moral lives. This essay develops a Christian virtue account of moral luck, drawing on Thomas Aquinas and womanist theologians including Melanie L. Harris and Rosita deAnn Mathews. Moral luck helps Christian ethicists attend to the impact of difference on the moral (...)
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  10.  9
    Wealth, virtue, and moral luck: Christian ethics in an age of inequality.Kate Ward - 2021 - Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press.
    In this book, Kate Ward addresses the issue of inequality from the perspective of Christian virtue ethics. Her unique contribution is to argue that moral luck, our individual life circumstances, affects one's ability to pursue virtue. She argues that economic status functions as moral luck and impedes the ability of both the wealthy and the impoverished to pursue virtues such as prudence, justice, and temperance. The book presents social science evidence that inequality reduces empathy for others' suffering, and increases violence, (...)
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  11.  1
    Moral Injury and the Promise of Virtue. [REVIEW]Kate Ward - 2021 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 41 (2):391-392.
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