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  1.  6
    The Ikhwan Al-Safa’’s Animal Accusers.Katharine Loevy - 2019 - Environmental Philosophy 16 (2):319-338.
    In the tenth-century Iraqi fable, The Case of the Animals versus Man Before the King of the Jinn, the animals take the human beings to court for mistreatment. The humans ultimately win the case, but not without the animals presenting a series of arguments that continue to resonate despite the ending of the trial. The following essay provides an analysis of a number of these arguments insofar as they contest human abuses of animals within the context of enslavement. It offers (...)
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  2.  7
    The Poetics of the Body in Islamic Mysticism.Katharine Loevy - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 68 (1):161-173.
    The category of the body is invested with an accumulation of meaning and significance, and it is far from obvious what "the body" does or ought to mean. The body is not, as one might presume, the locus of "nature" as opposed to "culture." It is not the site of what is given to us without the mediations of language or history, and it does not provide the substrate for an overlay of religious, linguistic, historical, or literary significance. To the (...)
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  3.  23
    Levinas and the Binding of Isaac.Katharine Loevy - 2012 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (2):407-423.
    The biblical story of the binding of Isaac may have originally been written without the figure of the angel. As such, it reads strongly as an account of Abraham disobeying God’s direct command for the sake of Isaac. Interestingly, then, many interpreters since the time of the text’s final redaction read the binding of Isaac as an account of ethical disobedience despite the presence of the angel. In what follows, I consider Levinas’s account of religion, revelation and ethics for the (...)
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  4.  12
    Confronting Natural Death in Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit.Katharine Loevy - 2010 - PhaenEx 5 (1):59-91.
    The following essay considers Life in Hegel's Phenomenology, and hence Life as it appears if viewed not through the perspective of the well-being of any singular living thing, but in terms of Life as an emergent pattern that incorporates and connects all living things within it. Such a view on living things enables us to evaluate vis-à-vis the emergent image of Life the relative significance of any singular living thing’s passing. Yet while the framework provided by Hegel’s account of Life (...)
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  5.  5
    Al-Farabi’s Images.Katharine Loevy - 2016 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (1):67-84.
    Al-Farabi understands politically useful images to be good imitations of essences, and also effective means of persuasion for geographically and historically situated communities. Such images, moreover, are what constitute the virtuous religions of virtuous cities. At play in al-Farabi’s account of images is thus a relationship between image, religion, truth, and history, and one that brings with it certain implications for how we understand the nature of the human being. We are creatures of truth, of the grasping of essences, and (...)
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  6.  3
    Al-Farabi’s Images in Advance.Katharine Loevy - forthcoming - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy.
  7.  2
    The Fear of the Dog.Katharine Loevy - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (1):155-173.
    Levinas rarely speaks about non-human animals directly, but his texts and his interviews are saturated with animal rhetoric. Levinas’s most ubiquitous gesture is to cast non-human animals as beings whose striving to live is a form of violence. These images constitute violence as endemic to nature, and provide the essential contrast to what Levinas regards as the strictly human event of ethics. In order to sufficiently interrogate the fate of non-human animals in Levinas’s philosophy, we must address the manner in (...)
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  8.  2
    The Dimension of Difference: Space, Time and Bodies in Women’s Cinema and Continental Philosophy, by Caroline Godart.Katharine Loevy - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (4):544-547.
  9.  1
    "The Fear of the Dog" in Advance.Katharine Loevy - forthcoming - Philosophy Today.
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