Results for 'Katherine Alfredo'

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  1.  88
    The University and the Responsible Conduct of Research: Who is Responsible for What? [REVIEW]Katherine Alfredo & Hillary Hart - 2011 - Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (3):447-457.
    Research misconduct has been thoroughly discussed in the literature, but mainly in terms of definitions and prescriptions for proper conduct. Even when case studies are cited, they are generally used as a repository of “lessons learned.” What has been lacking from this conversation is how the lessons of responsible conduct of research are imparted in the first place to graduate students, especially those in technical fields such as engineering. Nor has there been much conversation about who is responsible for what (...)
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  2.  35
    Ottawa Statement from the Sparking Solutions Summit on Population Health Intervention Research : Déclaration d’Ottawa issue du sommet Provoquer des solutions sur la recherche interventionnelle en santé des populations.Erica Ruggiero, Louise Potvin, John P. Allegrante, Angus Dawson, Marcel Verweij, Evelyn Leeuw, James R. Dunn, Eduardo Franco, Katherine L. Frohlich, Robert Geneau, Suzanne Jackson, Jay S. Kaufman, Alfredo Morabia, Kenneth R. Mcleroy & Valéry Ridde - unknown
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  3.  6
    Alfredo Fragueiro: in memoriam.Alfredo Fragueiro & Olsen A. Ghirardi (eds.) - 2007 - Córdoba: Academia Nacional de Derecho y Ciencias Sociales de Córdoba, Instituto de Filosofía del Derecho.
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  4. Filosofia, musica, arti: studi e testimonianze sull'opera di Alfredo Parente.Alfredo Parente (ed.) - 1979 - Napoli: Arte tipografica.
     
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  5.  32
    II—Katherine Hawley: Neo-Fregeanism and Quantifier Variance.Katherine Hawley - 2007 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 81 (1):233-249.
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  6.  56
    Trust: A Very Short Introduction.Katherine Hawley - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    Katherine Hawley explores the key ideas about trust in this Very Short Introduction. Drawing on a wide range of disciplines including philosophy, psychology, and evolutionary biology, she emphasizes the nature and importance of trusting and being trusted, from our intimate bonds with significant others to our relationship with the state.
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  7. Mnemonic Justice.Katherine Puddifoot - forthcoming - In Memory and Testimony. OUP.
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  8.  29
    How to Be Trustworthy.Katherine Hawley - 2019 - New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
    Katherine Hawley investigates what trustworthiness means in our lives. We become untrustworthy when we break promises, miss deadlines, or give unreliable information. But we can't be sure about what we can commit to. Hawley examines the social obstacles to trustworthiness, and explores how we can steer between overcommitment and undercommitment.
  9.  10
    The Works of Katherine Davis Chapman Tillman.Katherine Davis Chapman Tillman - 1991 - Oxford University Press USA.
    The poetry and journalistic essays of Katherine Tillman often appeared in publications sponsored by the American Methodist church. Collected together for the first time, her works speak to the struggles and triumphs of African-American women.
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  10.  50
    How We Became Posthuman: Ten Years On An Interview with N. Katherine Hayles1.N. Katherine Hayles - 2010 - Paragraph 33 (3):318-330.
    This interview with N. Katherine Hayles, one of the foremost theorists of the posthuman, explores the concerns that led to her seminal book How We Became Posthuman, the key arguments expounded in that book, and the changes in technology and culture in the ten years since its publication. The discussion ranges across the relationships between literature and science; the trans-disciplinary project of developing a methodology appropriate to their intersection; the history of cybernetics in its cultural and political context ; (...)
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  11.  2
    Conocerse a uno mismo: examinado sin autocomplacencia.Alfredo Fierro - 1993 - Malagá: Universidad de Malagá.
  12.  24
    How Stereotypes Deceive Us.Katherine Puddifoot - 2021 - Oxford University Press.
    Stereotypes sometimes lead us to make poor judgements of other people, but they also have the potential to facilitate quick, efficient, and accurate judgements. How can we discern whether any individual act of stereotyping will have the positive or negative effect? How Stereotypes Deceive Us addresses this question. It identifies various factors that determine whether or not the application of a stereotype to an individual in a specific context will facilitate or impede correct judgements and perceptions of the individual. It (...)
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  13. Success and Knowledge-How.Katherine Hawley - 2003 - American Philosophical Quarterly 40 (1):19 - 31.
    In this paper, I argue that there is a notion of 'counterfactual success' which stands to knowledge how as true belief stands to propositional knowledge. (I attempt to avoid the question of whether knowledge how is a type of propositional knowledge.).
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  14.  29
    How things persist.Katherine Hawley - unknown
    How do things persist? Are material objects spread out through time just as they are spread out through space? Or is temporal persistence quite different from spatial extension? This key question lies at the heart of any metaphysical exploration of the material world, and it plays a crucial part in debates about personal identity and survival. This book explores and compares three theories of persistence — endurance, perdurance, and stage theories — investigating the ways in which they attempt to account (...)
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  15.  18
    The Powers of Pure Reason: Kant and the Idea of Cosmic Philosophy.Alfredo Ferrarin - 2015 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
    The Critique of Pure Reason—Kant’s First Critique—is one of the most studied texts in intellectual history, but as Alfredo Ferrarin points out in this radically original book, most of that study has focused only on very select parts. Likewise, Kant’s oeuvre as a whole has been compartmentalized, the three Critiques held in rigid isolation from one another. Working against the standard reading of Kant that such compartmentalization has produced, The Powers of Pure Reason explores forgotten parts of the First (...)
  16. Exploitative Epistemic Trust.Katherine Dormandy - 2020 - In Trust in Epistemology. New York City, New York, Vereinigte Staaten: pp. 241-264.
    Where there is trust, there is also vulnerability, and vulnerability can be exploited. Epistemic trust is no exception. This chapter maps the phenomenon of the exploitation of epistemic trust. I start with a discussion of how trust in general can be exploited; a key observation is that trust incurs vulnerabilities not just for the party doing the trusting, but also for the trustee (after all, trust can be burdensome), so either party can exploit the other. I apply these considerations to (...)
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  17. How Things Persist.Katherine Hawley - 2003 - Philosophical Quarterly 53 (213):613-616.
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  18.  46
    Eternity has no Duration: Katherin A. Rogers.Katherin A. Rogers - 1994 - Religious Studies 30 (1):1-16.
    In 1981 Eleonore Stump and Norman Kretzmann published a landmark article aimed at exploring the classical concept of divine eternity. 1 Taking Boethius as the primary spokesman for the traditional view, they analyse God's eternity as timeless yet as possessing duration. More recently Brian Leftow has seconded Stump and Kretzmann's interpretation of the medieval position and attempted to defend the notion of a durational eternity as a useful way of expressing the sort of life God leads. 2 However, there are (...)
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  19. The concept of psychology.Katherine Park & Eckhard Kessler - 1988 - In Charles B. Schmitt, Quentin Skinner & Eckhard Kessler (eds.), The Cambridge History of Renaissance Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. pp. 455--63.
  20. How Things Persist.Katherine Hawley - 2001 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 69 (1):230-233.
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  21.  14
    Classic texts: Extracts from Leibniz, Kant, and Black.Katherine A. Brading & Elena Castellani - 2003 - In Katherine A. Brading & Elena Castellani (eds.), Symmetries in Physics: Philosophical Reflections. Cambridge University Press. pp. 203.
  22.  51
    Heidegger on Being Uncanny.Katherine Withy - 2015 - Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
    There are moments when things suddenly seem strange - objects in the world lose their meaning, we feel like strangers to ourselves, or human existence itself strikes us as bizarre and unintelligible. Through a detailed philosophical investigation of Heidegger's concept of uncanniness (Unheimlichkeit), Katherine Withy explores what such experiences reveal about us. She argues that while others (such as Freud, in his seminal psychoanalytic essay, 'The Uncanny') take uncanniness to be an affective quality of strangeness or eeriness, Heidegger uses (...)
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  23.  18
    Freedom and Self Creation: Anselmian Libertarianism.Katherin A. Rogers - 2015 - Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press UK.
    Katherin A. Rogers presents a new theory of free will, based on the thought of Anselm of Canterbury. We did not originally produce ourselves. Yet, according to Anselm, we can engage in self-creation, freely and responsibly forming our characters by choosing 'from ourselves' between open options. Anselm introduces a new, agent-causal libertarianism which is parsimonious in that, unlike other agent-causal theories, it does not appeal to any unique and mysterious powers to explain how the free agent chooses. After setting out (...)
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  24. Epistemic Discrimination.Katherine Puddifoot - 2017 - In Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen (ed.), Routledge Handbook of Ethics of Discrimination.
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  25.  22
    The culinary and social-semiotic meaning of food: Spicy meals and their significance in Mexico, Italy, and Texas.Alfredo Tenoch Cid Jurado - 2016 - Semiotica 2016 (211):247-269.
    The objective of this study is to provide insight into culinary systems. Each culture expresses its own identity through the way in which it transforms food into an elaborated cuisine. The phases of a cooking process start with the choice of ingredients, their preparation, their processing, how they are served, and how they are eaten. Each of these phases makes it possible to understand the semiotic and social behavior of a human group in the moment they choose to prepare and (...)
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  26. Do We See Facts?Alfredo Vernazzani - 2020 - Mind and Language (4):674-693.
    Philosophers of perception frequently assume that we see actual states of affairs, or facts. Call this claim factualism. In his book, William Fish suggests that factualism is supported by phenomenological observation as well as by experimental studies on multiple object tracking and dynamic feature-object integration. In this paper, I examine the alleged evidence for factualism, focusing mainly on object detection and tracking. I argue that there is no scientific evidence for factualism. This conclusion has implications for studies on the phenomenology (...)
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  27.  81
    Vision and certitude in the age of Ockham: optics, epistemology, and the foundations of semantics, 1250-1345.Katherine H. Tachau - 1988 - New York: E.J. Brill.
  28. Ontological Innocence.Katherine Hawley - 2014 - In A. J. Cotnoir & Donald L. M. Baxter (eds.), Composition as Identity. Oxford University Press. pp. 70-89.
    In this chapter, I examine Lewis's ideas about ontological innocence, ontological commitment and double-counting, in his discussion of composition as identity in Parts of Classes. I attempt to understand these primarily as epistemic or methodological claims: how far can we get down this route without adopting radical metaphysical theses about composition as identity?
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  29. Symmetries in Physics: Philosophical Reflections.Katherine Brading & Elena Castellani (eds.) - 2002 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Highlighting main issues and controversies, this book brings together current philosophical discussions of symmetry in physics to provide an introduction to the subject for physicists and philosophers. The contributors cover all the fundamental symmetries of modern physics, such as CPT and permutation symmetry, as well as discussing symmetry-breaking and general interpretational issues. Classic texts are followed by new review articles and shorter commentaries for each topic. Suitable for courses on the foundations of physics, philosophy of physics and philosophy of science, (...)
  30. Social Identity, Indexicality, and the Appropriation of Slurs.Katherine Ritchie - 2017 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 17 (2):155-180.
    Slurs are expressions that can be used to demean and dehumanize targets based on their membership in racial, ethnic, religious, gender, or sexual orientation groups. Almost all treatments of slurs posit that they have derogatory content of some sort. Such views—which I call content-based—must explain why in cases of appropriation slurs fail to express their standard derogatory contents. A popular strategy is to take appropriated slurs to be ambiguous; they have both a derogatory content and a positive appropriated content. However, (...)
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  31. Introduction: An Overview of Trust and Some Key Epistemological Applications.Katherine Dormandy - 2020 - In Trust in Epistemology. New York: Routledge. pp. 1-40.
    I give an overview of the trust literature and then of six central issues concerning epistemic trust. The survey of trust zeroes in on the kinds of expectations that trust involves, trust’s characteristic psychology, and what makes trust rational. The discussion of epistemic trust focuses on its role in testimony, the epistemic goods that we trust for, the significance of epistemic trust in contrast to reliance, what makes epistemic trust rational, and epistemic self-trust.
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  32. Does Epistemic Humility Threaten Religious Beliefs?Katherine Dormandy - 2018 - Journal of Psychology and Theology 46 (4):292– 304.
    In a fallen world fraught with evidence against religious beliefs, it is tempting to think that, on the assumption that those beliefs are true, the best way to protect them is to hold them dogmatically. Dogmatic belief, which is highly confident and resistant to counterevidence, may fail to exhibit epistemic virtues such as humility and may instead manifest epistemic vices such as arrogance or servility, but if this is the price of secure belief in religious truths, so be it. I (...)
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  33. N eo-F regeanism and Q uantifier V ariance.Katherine Hawley - 2007 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 81 (1):233-249.
    In his paper in the same volume, Sider argues that, of maximalism and quantifier variance, the latter promises to let us make better sense of neo-Fregeanism. I argue that neo-Fregeans should, and seemingly do, reject quantifier variance. If they must choose between these two options, they should choose maximalism.
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  34.  73
    Symmetry and Symmetry Breaking.Katherine Brading & Elena Castellani - forthcoming - The Standford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Symmetry considerations dominate modern fundamental physics, both in quantum theory and in relativity. Philosophers are now beginning to devote increasing attention to such issues as the significance of gauge symmetry, quantum particle identity in the light of permutation symmetry, how to make sense of parity violation, the role of symmetry breaking, the empirical status of symmetry principles, and so forth. These issues relate directly to traditional problems in the philosophy of science, including the status of the laws of nature, the (...)
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  35.  25
    Between Geography and History: Hellenistic Constructions of the Roman World.Katherine Clarke - 2001 - Oxford University Press.
    Katherine Clarke explores three authors who wrote about the rise of the Roman Empire - Polybius, Posidonius, and Strabo. She examines the overlap between geography and history in their work, and considers how pre-existing traditions were used but transformed in order to describe the new world of Rome.
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  36. The Structure of Sensorimotor Explanation.Alfredo Vernazzani - 2018 - Synthese (11):4527-4553.
    The sensorimotor theory of vision and visual consciousness is often described as a radical alternative to the computational and connectionist orthodoxy in the study of visual perception. However, it is far from clear whether the theory represents a significant departure from orthodox approaches or whether it is an enrichment of it. In this study, I tackle this issue by focusing on the explanatory structure of the sensorimotor theory. I argue that the standard formulation of the theory subscribes to the same (...)
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  37. Temporal Parts.Katherine Hawley - 2004/2010 - Stanford Encylopedia of Philosophy.
    Material objects extend through space by having different spatial parts in different places. But how do they persist through time? According to some philosophers, things have temporal parts as well as spatial parts: accepting this is supposed to help us solve a whole bunch of metaphysical problems, and keep our philosophy in line with modern physics. Other philosophers disagree, arguing that neither metaphysics nor physics give us good reason to believe in temporal parts.
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  38.  31
    Supramodal executive control of attention.Alfredo Spagna, Melissa-Ann Mackie & Jin Fan - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  39. Narrative and the emergence of a consciousness of self.Katherine Nelson - 2003 - In Gary D. Fireman, T. E. McVay & Owen J. Flanagan (eds.), Narrative and Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
  40.  10
    Heidegger on Being Self-Concealing.Katherine Withy - 2022 - Oxford University Press.
    What is Heidegger talking about when he says that being conceals itself? This is the first study to systematically address that question. Katherine Withy analyses texts from across Heidegger's philosophical career and sorts the various phenomena of concealing and concealment that Heideggerdiscusses into a highly-structured taxonomy. The taxonomy clarifies the relationships and differences between such phenomena as lethe, the nothing, earth, excess, the backgrounding of the world, and un-truth, as well as speaking falsely, talking idly, secrets, mysteries, seeming, andinauthentic (...)
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  41.  14
    Covert Spatial Attention and Saccade Planning.Katherine M. Armstrong - 2011 - In Christopher Mole, Declan Smithies & Wayne Wu (eds.), Attention: Philosophical and Psychological Essays. Oxford University Press. pp. 78.
  42.  4
    La intersubjetividad a la luz de la apertura íntima personal.Alfredo Rodríguez Sedano & Juan Carlos Aguilera - 2011 - Studia Poliana 13:31-49.
    In this article we are going to approach the question of the intersubjectivity. To understand why the intersubjectivity is a modern problem and which is the solution that it fits, we have chosen to follow a descending route that gives light and should illuminate what today, in many areas, is seen as a problem. We will begin, consequently, approaching the person as not identical but dual. The above mentioned cosideration takes us from the hand to the distinction between someone and (...)
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  43. Social Creationism and Social Groups.Katherine Ritchie - 2018 - In Kendy Hess, Violetta Igneski & Tracy Lynn Isaacs (eds.), Collectivity: Ontology, Ethics, and Social Justice. London, UK: Rowman & Littlefield International. pp. 13-34.
    Social groups seem to be entities that are dependent on us. Given their apparent dependence, one might adopt Social Creationism—the thesis that all social groups are social objects created through (some specific types of) thoughts, intentions, agreements, habits, patterns of interaction, and practices. Here I argue that not all social groups come to be in the same way. This is due, in part, to social groups failing to share a uniform nature. I argue that some groups (e.g., racial and gender (...)
     
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  44. Special Relativity, Multiple B-series, and the Passage of Time.Fazekas Katherine - 2016 - American Philosophical Quarterly 53 (3):215-229.
    B- theorists frequently argue that the A- theoretic views are incompatible with the Special Theory of Relativity (STR) and that this is a problem for the A- theoretic views. however, the B- theory needs to be revised in light of implications of STR. in particular, it follows from STR that some events stand in genuine temporal relations to each other while others do not. Consequently, there isn’t a single temporal order of all events. instead, there are multiple B- series. Some (...)
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  45.  76
    Counting Possibilia.Alfredo Tomasetta - 2010 - Theoria 25 (2):163-174.
    Timothy Williamson supports the thesis that every possible entity necessarily exists and so he needs to explain how a possible son of Wittgenstein’s, for example, exists in our world:he exists as a merely possible object, a pure locus of potential. Williamson presents a short argument for the existence of MPOs: how many knives can be made by fitting together two blades and two handles? Four: at the most two are concrete objects, the others being merely possible knives and merely possible (...)
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  46.  25
    Independent perceptual reversals for simultaneously presented ambiguous figures.Alfredo Brancucci, Anita D'Anselmo, Maria Rosaria Pasciucco & Pietro San Martini - 2020 - Consciousness and Cognition 81:102928.
  47.  5
    90 Jahre philosophische Nietzsche-Rezeption.Alfredo Guzzoni (ed.) - 1979 - Königstein/Ts.: Hain.
  48. Religión y cultura sin contradicción: el pensamiento de Ludwig Feuerbach.Alfredo Horacio Zecca - 1990 - Buenos Aires: Editorial de la Universidad Católica Argentina.
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  49. Il Concetto Della Storia Antologia a Cura di Alfredo Parente. --.Benedetto Croce & Alfredo ed Parente - 1967 - Laterza.
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  50.  25
    Making time for the past: local history and the polis.Katherine Clarke - 2008 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    This book has two main and connected themes - the conception and articulation of time in the Greek world and the creation of history, especially in the context of the Greek city. Both how time is expressed and how the past is presented have often been seen as reflections of society. By looking at the construction of the past through the medium of local historiography, where we can view these issues in the relatively restricted world of individual city-states, we can (...)
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